John Clune of Mount Levers and Clonmoney, Co Clare

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Canuck
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Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2021 2:39 pm

John Clune of Mount Levers and Clonmoney, Co Clare

Post by Canuck » Tue Oct 12, 2021 5:03 pm

I believe that I'm descended from John Clune who was a farmer in Mount Levers between 1800 and about 1817. Ancestry.com gives a probate index entry for a will in Co Clare for him in 1817.
* Is there a chance the original will is left and if so, where can I find it?
* His children were Roman Catholic. Where would he likely be buried?

In addition to the probate index, I have found the following in the Deed records:
1) Memorial 470859, dated June 1800 and registered 22 Feb 1815. An agreement between Thomas Frost of Rossmanaher & John Clune Sr of Mount Ievers concerning the marriage of Thomas' daughter Mary to John Clune's oldest son John Clune Jr. The Clunes guarantee that they will use the lands of Kilconemore, a 1/3 share of a tenement in Leverstown, and 1/3 share of Ballyluden West to guarantee Mary Frost an annuity of 10 pounds/year for her life if John Clune Jr. should die before her. Also mentions lands at Hellelonemore.
2) Memorial 471517 dated 26 Jan 1815, registered 22 Feb 1815. Mortgage deed between John Clune of Clonmoney east and Thos Frost of ?Oldsheet? in co Clare Farmer. Grants Thomas Frost the use of the town and lands of Kilclonemore for the lives of John Clune, eldest son, James Clune 3rd son, and Matthew Clune the 4th son of the late Jno Clune of Mount Ievers.

I've found all of the places mentioned except for Hellelonemore. Can anyone tell me where it is?

smcarberry
Posts: 1159
Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2007 4:31 pm
Location: USA

Re: John Clune of Mount Levers and Clonmoney, Co Clare

Post by smcarberry » Wed Oct 13, 2021 12:30 am

Hello again,

When we last discussed your Clune family's location in East Clare, I used the 1829 Freeholders list to locate a likely candidate for Kilclonemore in Bunratty Barony, and then reported no Clune burials in Clonmoney graveyard:

CLUNE, John, Bunra, Clonmoney, Kilclounamore, £50, 09/01/1809

Spelling variations occur over time for many locations in Clare but in discussions like this I recommend using the current usual spelling of a locality, for ease of communication and to avoid confusion among your readers. Transcriptions also result in localities having odd spellings, particularly with the initial letters of the name. I recommend referring to Mount Ievers and Ieverstown unless you are quoting a passage stating Mount Levers or Leverstown, in which case you can provide the incorrect reference followed by the correct spelling in brackets, after the word "sic." For the same reason, Balyiluden should appear as Ballyliddane.

Your Clunes in the early 1800s lived in the civil parishes of Quin, Kilfintinan, and Kilfinaghta, for which there are comprehensive lists of townlands on the Clare County Library genealogy webpages. I have checked those quickly and see nothing resembling Helleclonemore. However, with the substitution of H for K at the beginning and adding an extra "e" in the middle, the word is likely Kilclonemore, an acceptable variation for Kilclounamore. Such things are common when dealing with handwriting of that era. For the best approximation of the actual spelling on the deed page, viewing the deed is possible. I am assuming you have been consulting the deed transcriptions at the Nick Reddan's volunteer project site.

For wills, a primary source prior to 1922 was the same building housing the deeds on which the Reddan's project depends, but it was the wills and will extracts there that took a heavy hit, while all the deed books were left in pristine condition. The usual source now used is the National Archives (Dublin) which has digitized its will collections in two databases, both online but the time period is 1858 forward. Its only pre-1858 database for wills is the Diocesan and Prerogative Wills Indexes, which you can consult but its covering a Catholic with a Clare-level of wealth is a bit of stretch.

smcarberry
Posts: 1159
Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2007 4:31 pm
Location: USA

Re: John Clune of Mount Levers and Clonmoney, Co Clare

Post by smcarberry » Wed Oct 13, 2021 10:01 am

Hello again,

When we last discussed your Clune family's location in East Clare, I used the 1829 Freeholders list to locate a likely candidate for Kilclonemore in Bunratty Barony, and then reported no Clune burials in Clonmoney graveyard:

CLUNE, John, Bunra, Clonmoney, Kilclounamore, £50, 09/01/1809

Spelling variations occur over time for many locations in Clare but in discussions like this I recommend using the current usual spelling of a locality, for ease of communication and to avoid confusion among your readers. Transcriptions also result in localities having odd spellings, particularly with the initial letters of the name. I recommend referring to Mount Ievers and Ieverstown unless you are quoting a passage stating Mount Levers or Leverstown, in which case you can provide the incorrect reference followed by the correct spelling in brackets, after the word "sic." For the same reason, Ballyluden should appear as Ballyliddane.

Your Clunes in the early 1800s lived in the civil parishes of Quin, Kilfintinan, and Kilfinaghta, for which there are comprehensive lists of townlands on the Clare County Library genealogy webpages. I have checked those quickly and see nothing resembling Helleclonemore. However, with the substitution of H for K at the beginning and adding an extra "e" in the middle, the word is likely Kilclonemore, an acceptable variation for Kilclounamore. Such things are common when dealing with handwriting of that era. For the best approximation of the actual spelling on the deed page, viewing the deed is possible. I am assuming you have been consulting the deed transcriptions at the Nick Reddan's volunteer project site.

For wills, a primary source prior to 1922 was the same building housing the deeds on which the Reddan's project depends, but it was the wills and will extracts there that took a heavy hit, while all the deed books were left in pristine condition. The usual source now used is the National Archives (Dublin) which has digitized its will collections in two databases, both online but the time period is 1858 forward. Its only pre-1858 database for wills is the Diocesan and Prerogative Wills Indexes, which you can consult but its covering a Catholic with a Clare-level of wealth is a bit of stretch.

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