Did the O’Gorman Mahon walk the Flaggy Shore?

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Sduddy
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Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Did the O’Gorman Mahon walk the Flaggy Shore?

Post by Sduddy » Tue Mar 10, 2020 3:54 pm

The mention of Mount Vernon house in this piece in Saturday’s Irish Times, describing a walk by the Flaggy Shore: https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-sty ... -1.4168586 , reminded me that I came upon an entry in the New Quay baptisms that shows that the O’Gorman Mahon might have visited there in 1850:
08 Nov. 1850: Philip of William J. Skerrett and Ann McMahon, Finevarra; sponsors: The O’Gorman MacMahon, Mrs. Dalton.
The priest has spelled the name “MacMahon”, but I still think it must be the O’Gorman Mahon.
New Quay baptisms: https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 1/mode/1up

Mount Vernon was once owned by the Skerrett family: http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/Lande ... sp?id=1792
It was named after Mount Vernon, Virginia, the home of George Washington, and the story goes that cypress trees still standing in the garden were a present from George Washington: https://www.ireland.com/what-is-availab ... l/1-89785/

Sheila

Sduddy
Posts: 955
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Did the O’Gorman Mahon walk the Flaggy Shore?

Post by Sduddy » Wed Mar 11, 2020 11:01 am

Here is “Postscript”, the poem by Seamus Heaney mentioned above in the piece by O’Dwyer: https://vimeo.com/73559117

And here you can take a virtual walk by the Flaggy Shore. You can see the cypress trees on the horizon. Keep walking and you will see the lake with the swans. I see a few daffodils too, so it was this time of the year: https://www.google.com/maps/@53.1569154 ... 312!8i6656

Sheila

Sduddy
Posts: 955
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Did the O’Gorman Mahon walk the Flaggy Shore?

Post by Sduddy » Sat Mar 14, 2020 11:08 am

Oysters called Red Bank Oysters came from near the Flaggy Shore, and are mentioned in James Joyce’s Ulysses.

Here is some more on the oysters and the “Oyster Road”: In Parish of Kilkeedy, Frank Brew writes on the big houses of parish of Kilkeedy (Tubber), including Rockforest House in the townland of Magheraraheen, also called Rockforest (pp 97-100). This house was built in the 18th century and, looking at the photograph on p 99, I notice that it is very like Mount Vernon (New Quay). It was the residence fo Bindon Blood. The story goes that Bindon Blood was responsible for the building of the road that goes from New Quay to Kilkeedy/Tubber (the N67 and then L4507). Frank Brew says,
It is named the New Line on the map, but it was always known as Bindons Line, and credit for its construction was given to Bindon Blood. It was also known as the “Oyster Road”, and it is said that the real reason for making it was to carry the oysters from the beds around the shore to the market. It connected with other roads across Ireland and relays of horses were used to get the oysters as speedily as possible not alone to Dublin, but via Rosslare to the kitchens of the Houses of Parliament in London.
It’s hard to believe that the oysters were still edible by the time they got to London. I remember when eels were sent to Billingsgate, in the 1950s, but that involved packing them with ice and sending them from Shannon Airport.

Sheila

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