McInerney 1898 postcard from Killawinna to Belgium

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Jimbo
Posts: 362
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Re: McInerney 1898 postcard from Killawinna to Belgium

Post by Jimbo » Mon May 25, 2020 7:26 am

Hi Sheila,

Yes, the newspaper reviews for Mary Jane O'Donovan Rossa's readings often noted her beauty. "Mrs. O'Donovan is a lady of prepossessing appearances blonde, with dark hair and regular, pleasant features, while her countenance is draped in smiles, and now and then absolutely bewitching. As an elocutionist she has few superiors," reported the Dubuque Daily Times of 22 June 1869.

Below is a map of Iowa showing the numbers of Irish in 1870 by county and their rank among other foreign born groups. The county names are very tiny, but Dubuque is located on the eastern border of the state and in 1870 had 4,237 Irish born. The Irish were the second most populous compared to other foreign born groups in Dubuque; most likely behind the Germans. It appears that the Irish percentage for Dubuque County in 1870 from "The Irish in Iowa" from my last posting was incorrect. The total population of Dubuque County of 38,969 in 1870 (per wikipedia & ancestry search query), multiplied by 16.7 percent Irish does not equal 4,237 Irish born (this # agrees very closely to the results of an ancestry search query). I believe the correct % of Irish was only about 11 percent in Dubuque County.
Irish in Iowa, by County, 1870.jpg
Irish in Iowa, by County, 1870.jpg (402.21 KiB) Viewed 894 times

Thanks for the interesting biography of Thomas Considine of Buchanan County. Sheila, I don't think you should compare the pioneer experience of the Considine's with those Irish who settled in Dubuque. Dubuque was a city on the Mississippi River where Irish would have been living since at least the 1830's and its main industry was the mining of lead, not farming. Buchanan County, two counties to the west of Dubuque, had 958 Irish born in 1870, the highest number compared to other foreign born groups. Whether or not a pioneer like Thomas Considine was included in the History of Buchanan County would be helped that he was still "hale and hearty" in 1914 when the book was published (and also if the Considine family paid the publisher for an advanced copy of the book).

Thanks also for the Little House on the Prairie connection to Winneshiek County where the family of Martin Maley of Glandree was living. On the Iowa map, Winneshiek is two counties north of Buchanan County, on the northern border with Minnesota. In 1870, there were 731 Irish born, ranked #3 of foreign born groups per "Irish in Iowa".

I find it interesting that by immigrating to America we often know far more about the individuals than if they had remained in Ireland. The 1870 Agriculture Census that accompanied the federal population census provides far greater detail than the 1855 Griffiths Valuation. Martin Maleagh of Winneshiek County had a 120 acre farm with a cash value of $2,000, farming implements valued at $40, two horses, three cows, and six swine. Compared to his Irish neighbors, Martin was not the most productive farmer. Of his 120 acres, 40 acres were still woodland, and 40 acres were "other unimproved". His spring wheat crop in 1870 was only 100 bushels (Patrick Nolan had 600 bushels), and, unlike his neighbors, he planted no Indian corn, oats, or barley that year. Martin also harvested 60 bushels of Irish potatoes; produced 350 pounds of butter; 15 tons of hay; and 40 pounds of wool. He sold farm animals for slaughter, valued at $290, which may have included all of his sheep.

Looking at the map of Iowa in 1870, the northwest of the state had the least population of Irish (as well as total settlers overall). This reflects overall western migration trends, but also the northwestern part of Iowa had greater risk in the 1850's. In the winter of 1857, the same year the Patrick Considine family arrived in Iowa, a band of 150 to 200 Sioux warriors killed about 40 white settlers and took four young women captive in what is known as the "Spirit Lake Massacre". From reading accounts of the massacre, none of the victims appear to have been Irish. Although within 40 miles of Spirit Lake, and half the distance to Fort Dodge, was an "Irish Colony" (later named Emmetsburg after Robert Emmet) that was the staging area for the troops sent from Fort Dodge as well as survivors from Spirit Lake. The troops and survivors "had eaten up all the provisions the poor Irish people at the Colony had, they sharing to the last with us, so I [Major Williams] concluded it would be prudent to push forward for home [Fort Dodge] and as soon as possible send back provisions to the Irish Colony as they must have some relief some way. (The History of Early Fort Dodge & Webster County, by Major Wm. Williams).

Unlike the Major Williams account, this version states there were only 15 Sioux involved: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirit_Lake_Massacre

Sheila, with regards to the Irish in Minnesota we had previously discussed "Bishop Ireland's Connemara Experiment" in the Quinlivan of Kilrush thread (page 3):
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=6623&start=30

Unfortunately, the link to the "On This Day" segment that mentioned the Connemara Experiment on Drivetime on RTÉ Radio 1 that Paddy Waldron provided is no longer working.

Sduddy
Posts: 947
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: McInerney 1898 postcard from Killawinna to Belgium

Post by Sduddy » Mon May 25, 2020 10:48 am

Hi Jimbo

Thanks for that interesting posting. Thanks for the map of Iowa. I did virtual drive into the town of Boone, in Boone county, Iowa, and drove down Story Street, where Patrick O’Malley lived for most of his life. It’s a very long street, with residences, then shops and businesses, then more residences, and trees on either side making a lovely colonnade. I also went to Burr Oak, but google maps did not allow me to go in, so I drove out to Bluffton, where the scenery is quite dramatic. Then I did a virtual drive from De Smet, South Dakota, where the Ingalls settled, to Huron, where Cornelius Malley lived for a while in 1900. Again the scenery is dramatic but in a different way. Laura Ingalls Wilder describes it well in her books and I can see why she sat on the doorstep looking at the sunset and at the stars. I passed through Manchester, which I gather was levelled by a tornado in 2003. In Huron I drove past the public library and the Lutheran Church and all around.

About the "Connemaras" – it seems a good many went to St. Paul where they lived in a place often called “the Connemara Patch”. At least one family returned home – the Burkes (De Búrca). Éamon a Búrc, who was in Graceville as a child, became a well-known story teller afterwards, but I don’t know if he ever spoke of his time in Graceville: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Éamon_a_Búrc

Getting back to the main topic, I notice that there were obits for some members of the McInerny family, Killawinna, published in the Clare Champion. There’s one for Cornelius McInerney (published 17 Mar 1917), which might mention his sons in America. Usually it’s only the chief mourners who attended the funeral who get a mention in Irish obituaries - relatives abroad are omitted, which is a great pity - but I think that Fr. John McInerney would have been mentioned in this obit., and maybe James also. Some day I will look it up.

Sheila

Jimbo
Posts: 362
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:43 am

Re: McInerney 1898 postcard from Killawinna to Belgium

Post by Jimbo » Thu Jun 04, 2020 8:21 am

Hi Sheila,

Yes, getting back to the main topic, my last posting neglected to thank you for your further research into the children of Cornelius McInerney and Mary Hogan of Killawinna. The Bernadette McInerney who contributed so many entries with the School's Collection as a student at Knockanean School was most certainly the daughter of Patrick McInerney. For most of Bernadette's contributions, it will state "Told by father of Bernadette McInerney, Killawinna, Quin, age 67 years (Patrick McInerney)". One story entitled "Tramps" contributed by Bernadette states "Told by Mrs. Brennan, age 56 years, Aunt of Bernadette McI., Quin", so as you suspected, Bernadette was the niece of National School Teacher, Mary Margaret McInerney Brennan. This story runs four pages and Mary Margaret tells her niece about the "tramps" living in her community when she was a child, most likely about the same time period when the 1898 postcard was written:

https://www.duchas.ie/en/cbes/5177638/5175058

The "Tramps" story contributed by Bernadette McInerney is the first of nine stories on the same topic submitted by other students at Knockanean School. The other stories submitted are much shorter and, generally, not that positive. On the other hand, the story told by Mary Margaret emphasizes "great respect" and the "great welcome" they received. While her classmates' submissions have the vocabulary and grammar of young students, Bernadette writes like a National School teacher. I reckon Mary Margaret obtained the other "Tramp" submissions and wanted to leave a different record for posterity and used her niece to do so:
About forty of fifty years ago a great many beggars and tramps used to go from house to house in each district. A certain number came to each district and these poor people never begged in any other district but their own.

Very often the names of these people was not known except for by nicknames. They included traveling musicians, beggar women and beggar men, pedlars and tramps. Among the travelling musicians there were two who visited my father's house, one was named Jimmy Shea. He used to say he was born in Ballycotton. Jimmy travelled on an ass car and usually brought a tick of feathers, a quilt, a blanket, a fiddle, a musical instrument which he called a hurdy-gurdy and a small black box which contained his personal belongings such as collars, shirts, socks, money and many other valuable things. He travelled generally between Doora, Crusheen, Lahinch and even on to Ballyvaughan but he only visited certain houses. The people of these houses were generally related, so Jimmy was a welcome visitor because he brought news of cousins who were rarely seen or met, since they lived great distances from each other. Jimmy was a cripple and when he arrived a chair was brought to the ass-car. Jimmy slided off the ass-car on to the chair and he worked the chair in to the fire. The bed used be brought in and be put in the corner and all his boxes. When Jimmy arrived all the neighbours used gather in for a dance. Jimmy was proud and everybody had great respect for him. He generally stayed a fortnight in each house and then travelled off in his ass and car to the other cousins who received him with a great welcome.

Excerpt from The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0594, Page 182 - 185
Looking on a map, Doora is a considerable distance from Lahinch and Ballyvaughan especially for Jimmy Shea traveling by ass cart. But still, when Mary Margaret told this story to her niece she had brothers in Kansas and Iowa which are truly "great distances" from County Clare.

Jimmy Shea played many musical instruments, including the hurdy-gurdy. I had never heard of this instrument, but found a short clip on youtube of a County Clare man playing the hurdy-gurdy with the Cliffs of Moher as a backdrop:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPyIwZFRkhA

Mary Margaret continues by telling the funny story of the "bitter enemies" Miss Burke and "Jack the Tank" and how her "Uncle James" appears to have stirred the pot by asking Jack the Tank if his new boot laces were a present from Miss Burke.

Burke is a common name in Ireland, but "Miss Burke" must be the single 70 year old Mary Bourke living in House 8 in Monanoe Townland in Doora in the 1901 Irish census. Monanoe and Killawinna townlands are adjacent. Mary Bourke's occupation was reported as "Mendicent"; a mendicant is a fancy word for a beggar.

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/p ... e/1070606/

"Uncle James" must be the James McInerney born in 1833 in Cloondorney More in Tulla Parish to parents Nash McInerney and Mary Melehan. James McInerney, son of Ignatius McInerney, of Tulla, married Anne McGrath, son of Patrick McGrath, of Glen, on 19 October 1867 at the RC Chapel at O'Gonelloe (Scariff registration district). Their first born son in 1869 was named Ignatius. In 1901, Mary McGrath McInerney was a 70 year old widow living at House 5 in Clondorney More in Kiltannon living with Ignatius (age 32) and two other children:

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/p ... e/1087698/

Mary Margaret continued with her "Tramps" story:
Another little woman used [to] go around, she was so old that she used [to] be called "98". She wore a white muslin cap trimmed with lace, a white apron, and a little black cloak. She could not climb the walls. Often my grandfather took her over the walls in his arms. These poor people were very welcome. Everybody had great respect for them. Little "98" used [to] bring a bag for flour, tea and sugar. They came in, sat down, and usually got a cup of tea before they left ,and tea and sugar when they were going.
Mary Margaret's grandfather who would carry "Little 98" over the walls in his arms, must be her maternal grandfather, James Hogan. James Hogan of Ballaghboy, married, died on 2 February 1900 at the age of 100 years old; informant Bridget Hogan, widow of deceased (Ennis registration). Mary Margaret was born in January 1884 so was definitely old enough to have memories of her grandfather James Hogan. In the 1901 Irish census, the widow Bridget Hogan (age 70) was living in House 8 in Ballaghboy, Doora with her son Michael Hogan (age 40) and his wife and nine children:

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/p ... y/1070517/

In the Doora Kilraghtis baptism register, James Hogan and Bridget Moylan had two daughters named Mary baptized in 1846 and 1847. I suspect that the younger daughter might be the Margaret (Marg) Hogan who was living with her sister, Mary Hogan McInerney, in the 1901 Irish census, and who went to Kansas with her nephew, the Reverend John J. McInerney in 1902. Michael Hogan, who was age 40, living with his mother in 1901, I reckon was recorded in the Doora baptism register, but incorrectly by the parish priest. Michael Hogan (father) and Bridget Moylan (mother) had a son transcribed as "John?", but more likely "James", baptized in August 1849. The priest appears to have swapped the names of father and son in the baptism register. Michael Hogan was age 40 in the 1901 Irish census, which would indicate a birth about 1861. However, in the 1911 census, Michael Hogan was in House 9 in Ballaghoy, Doora and his age was more accurately reported as age 62, so indeed born about 1849:

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/p ... oy/354296/

Also living in the Michael Hogan household of Ballaghoy in 1911 was a lodger by the name of James O'Shea, single, age 86. James Shea, from Ballaghboy, bachelor, laborer, age 99, died at Ennis workhouse (hospital) on 16 April 1915. So it appears that Jimmy O'Shea who according to Mary Margaret travelled by ass cart from house to house and never spending more than a fortnight in one place, in old age would settle down with the Michael Hogan family.

Researching the 1901 Irish Census, we find James O'Shea, age 72, reported as a "Visitor" and "Musicner" in the Michael McNamara (age 52) household in House 6 in Ballyscanlan, Rathclooney:

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/p ... n/1087131/

Michael McNamara, age 27, of Ballyscanlan, son of Francis McNamara, married Catherine Clancy, age 22, of Drumbonniv, daughter of Patt Clancy, on 16 February 1881 at the Roman Catholic chapel at Crusheen. Francis McNamara, of Ballyscanlan, farmer, widower, age 72 years, died on 5 June 1885; informant daughter-in-law Catherine McNamara of Ballyscanlan.

Mary Margaret stated that the musician Jimmy O'Shea would travel between Doora and Crusheen and other more distant places and stay about a fortnight with different cousins. So perhaps the McInerney's of Doora are related to the McNamara's of Ballyscanlan. The Crusheen baptism register doesn't start until 1860, so Michael McNamara's baptism about 1854 would not be in the register.

Sheila, you will remember when searching for the missing Thomas McNamara of Glandree, you discussed whether or not Francis was a popular name with the McNamara's. There was a Thomas McNamara (age 32) living in Steuben County, NY in the 1875 census, having gone there from Tulla/Crusheen with his wife Judy/Julia O’Neil and four Irish born children a few years previously. We found two baptism records, one for Francis born in Tyreda (Tulla Parish) in 1867 and another for Anne in 1869 in Scalpnagown in Crusheen Parish.

This McNamara family would later settle in Pennsylvania. Thomas McNamara died on 12 December 1925 in Erie, Pennsylvania; his parents were reported as Thomas McNamara and "Mary ?"; birth date as "Feb 1839". There is a possibility that the PA death record reporting his father as "Thomas" was incorrect as the McNamara grandchildren would never have known their Irish grandfather. Thus, possible that Francis McNamara (≈1813 - 1885) of Crusheen Parish was the father of Thomas McNamara (≈1839 - 1925), who did name his first born son Francis.

Mary Margaret in her story told to her niece Bernadette goes on to tell about a pedlar named "Big Kate". Sheila, should you feel the need for any further atonement, or perhaps just the challenge of a difficult puzzle, it would be interesting to know more information about the tambourine playing "Jack the Tank", "Little 98", as well as "Big Kate". Since Mary Margaret McInerney was born in 1884, these characters are likely in the 1901 Irish census or perhaps in the death records of the 1890's.

Sduddy
Posts: 947
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: McInerney 1898 postcard from Killawinna to Belgium

Post by Sduddy » Thu Jun 04, 2020 4:18 pm

Hi Jimbo

I really enjoyed reading all that, and there was quite a bit of reading in it. You have done well finding Jimmy O’Shea, who travelled around visiting friends and relations, and who died in 1915, and also finding the Hogans and their daughter, Margaret Hogan, who went to Kansas in 1902.

Yes, I remember well the Thomas McNamara and Judy/Julia O’Neil, who went to Steuben County, NY, and later to Pennsylvania. Judy was from Scalpnagoun (Crusheen parish) – she was probably a cousin of Ellen O’Neill whose letters are among the information on Crusheen parish: http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclar ... ronane.htm

You mention that on the night of the census, 1901, Jimmy O’Shea was visiting the house of Michael McNamara in Ballyscanlan (in the parish of Crusheen), but I think Michael McNamara and Catherine Clancy may be just friends of Jimmy and not related – at least not through the McNamaras. I thought at first that Michael’s father, Francis McNamara, might have married a Hogan, but, no, I found a Frank McNamara (from Crusheen) who married Anne Burke from Moyriesk on 02 Feb 1845 (in Quin-Clooney marriages 1833–1855). Two of the witnesses are Michael and Dan Hogan, but I think they were probably just neighbours of Frank, from Ballyscanlan. Of course Jimmy O’Shea may have been related to Catherine Clancy, rather than to her husband. Catherine’s father was Pat Clancy (according to the record of her marriage to Michael McNamara). A John Clancy who was living in Drumbanniff in 1901 (aged 45) must have been a brother of Catherine. The record of John's marriage to Ellen Hehir in 1894 gives his father as Pat Clancy. But what was his mother’s name? She might have been a Hogan, but I have no way of finding out, I’m sorry to say. I think I have enough atonement done now!

Sheila

Sduddy
Posts: 947
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: McInerney 1898 postcard from Killawinna to Belgium

Post by Sduddy » Sat Jun 06, 2020 10:26 am

Hi Jimbo

This is a just small digression from the main topic, prompted by the glimpse we got of the McNamara household in Ballyscanlon as they were on census night, 1901. One boy, aged 13, is called Francis after his grandfather. He became a member of the Crusheen Volunteers, one of the companies of men that formed the Irish Volunteers (prior to the 1916 Rising). There is a brief piece on Francis McNamara in The Crusheen Volunteers and their role during 1916, by Gerry Kennedy (published 2016) – it is one one of about 18 such pieces in the chapter entitled: ‘The Crusheen Volunteers – Pen Pictures’ (p.33). Of course we know that these men did not take part in the rising, but Gerry Kennedy explains that they were in readiness for a rising from the time they got the first order on Sun 16 April. This was followed by the order on Thur 20 that they were to hold the railway line between Ennis and Gort to enable a shipment of arms to be transported from Kerry to Galway, and then another order on Sat 22 saying that they were to mobilise that night and each carry arms and a couple of days rations. On Sunday morning the countermanding order came that the rising had been called off, that they should disperse, but continue hold themselves in readiness. In a list of 15 men, who were among those who got that final order to mobilise, is Francis McNamara, but his address is Drumsallagh, Crusheen – not Ballyscanlan. The short piece on him, however, clarifies that Francis was from Ballyscanlon, a son of Michael McNamara and Kate Clancy “originally from Derrycalliff”. Francis inherited a farm in Drumsallagh from his aunt Eliza Fogarty née Clancy. He and his sister were already living with that aunt in 1911, as the census of that year shows.

Jimbo, here’s a digression within a digression: Gerry Kennedy quotes one of Crusheen Volunteers, Séan McNamara, as saying that their instructor “was a man named John Connell, an ex-British soldier, originally from the Turnpike road in Ennis. He was an ex-Connaught Ranger, a Boer War veteran, and was a very good man at the job’. Kennedy goes on to say that in 1909 John Connell married Maria O’Shea. In 1915 he joined the Connaught Rangers in Cork as a gunner. He was on active service in France from 29th September 1915 until 10th October 1917. He was discharged from the army on the 26th March 1918. I looked to see where John Connell and Maria (O’Shea) were living in 1911. They were living in Ballaghboy (John’s occupation: Railway Porter) and they had two children. But I am certainly not trying to make a connection between Maria and Jimmy O’Shea on the basis that they were living in the same townland in April 1911. In the record of her marriage to John Connell, Maria gives her father’s name as Patrick O’Shea, Labourer, and her addess as Clooney (I assume that’s Clooney, Bunratty, not Clooney, Corcomroe). The Clooney-Quin register of baptisms shows a great many Sheas, but they do not seem to have prospered there and have all gone away by 1901 – at least there is practically no evidence of them in the censuses. However the GenMap shows that there were plenty of Sheas and O’Sheas all over Co. Clare, so trying to find Jimmy O’Sheas origins would be like trying to find a needle in a haystack.

Well, It took a bit of twisting and turning, Jimbo, but I can now say that I’ve returned to the topic.

Sheila

Jimbo
Posts: 362
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:43 am

Re: McInerney 1898 postcard from Killawinna to Belgium

Post by Jimbo » Tue Jun 09, 2020 12:57 am

Hi Sheila,

Thanks for that interesting feedback. The "Tramps" story told by Mary Margaret Brennan to her niece Bernadine McInerney stated, "The people of these houses were generally related". I take this comment to mean that they were related to each other, but not necessarily to the musician Jimmy O'Shea.

And we know this to be true in the case of Jimmy O'Shea staying with the McInerney's of Killawinna and the Hogans of Ballaghboy since Mary Hogan McInerney and Michael Hogan were siblings.

Mary Margaret stated that Jimmy O'Shea "used to say he was born in Ballycotton". She never states that he was a relation and her comment about his origins leads me further to believe that they were not related.

In searching google maps, Ballycotton is north of Lahinch in the northwest of County Clare. Not to be confused with Ballycotton, County Cork, where in 1995 the movie trailer "Divine Rapture" starring Marlon Brando, Johnny Depp, Debra Winger, and John Hurt was filmed:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRbUC-D_JkU

Sheila, good work finding the marriage of Frank McNamara of Crusheen to Anne Burke of Moyriesk in February 1845 in the Quin Clooney marriage records. Since Frank McNamara married Anne Burke in 1845, they cannot be the parents of the Thomas McNamara who went to Steuben County, New York because he was born prior to 1845. It is more probable that the 1925 death record was accurate for Thomas McNamara of Steuben County and later Pennsylvania. And as previously speculated in the search for the missing Thomas McNamara (page 9), that he was the son of Thomas McNamara and Mary / Anne Donnellan of Tyredagh born in 1840. This family also had a son named Francis born in 1843.

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=6965&start=120

Sheila, still possible, of course, that Francis McNamara (1813 - 1885) of Ballyscanlan was a cousin of either the Hogans of Ballaghboy, Doora, or the McInerney's of Killawinna and Cloondorney More, but this would be difficult to prove. And thank you for the interesting story about his grandson, also named Francis McNamara, who was a member of the Crusheen Volunteers.

On 1855 Griffith Valuation, Francis McNamara of Ballyscanlan leased Plot 5, a little over 19 acres valued at about £15. Michael McNamara, son of Francis McNamara of Ballyscanlan, married Kate Clancy of Drumbonniv in 1881. Drumbonniv townland is just to the east of Ballyscanlan; in 1855 GV there is a Dennis Clancy leasing Plot 3 in Drumbonniv which is separated from the McNamara plot by only one other plot of land, although a rather large plot.

What I found most fascinating about Plot 5 in Ballyscanlan townland on the GV map was the ringfort to the west of the home. On the Clare Library site there are lists of ringforts and cashels in the Archaeology section, but the Ballyscanlan fort on the McNamara property does not appear to be included. I checked the google maps satellite view, and the fort is still clearly visible:

Ballyscanlan GV and satellite view Plot 5.jpg
Ballyscanlan GV and satellite view Plot 5.jpg (102.42 KiB) Viewed 713 times

Mary Margaret stated that when the musician Jimmy O'Shea would come to the McInerney home in Killawinna, all the people in the neighborhood would come together for a dance. In Ballyscanlan, if the weather was fine, the ringfort seems like it would have been an ideal place for Jimmy O'Shea to play his fiddle or hurdy-gurdy and the neighbors to gather for a dance. However, there are lots of stories if you search "fort" or "lios" in the School's Collection for County Clare (see links below). The general theme is that the ringforts were places inhabited by the fairies, and frequently of unexplained deaths for those who went inside, and thus places to be avoided. I doubt very much that any dances were held inside the ringfort when Jimmy O'Shea came to visit the McNamara's of Ballyscanlan.

https://www.duchas.ie/en/src?q=fort&t=CbesStory&ct=CL
https://www.duchas.ie/en/src?q=lios&t=CbesStory&ct=CL

It is interesting to compare the lives of Francis McNamara of Ballyscanlan with those Irish who left Ireland and became pioneers in Iowa in the 1850's. In the case of the Irish in northwestern Iowa, they also lived nearby forts, and during the 1857 Spirit Lake Massacre sought shelter at Fort Dodge. Francis McNamara, whose farm was located on a public road, would have to deal with what one could only describe as petty harassment by the authorities. The petty sessions reveal that Francis McNamara, a farmer of Ballyscanlan, was fined in 1855 for "defendants pigs wandering on the public road", in 1857 for "defendants dog wandering on the public road at Ballyscanlan without a muzzle", and in 1864 for "defendants ass wandering on the public road near O'Brien's Castle", a neighboring townland. In comparison, the Irish in northwestern Iowa in the 1850's were in danger of getting scalped by the Sioux.

In reviewing the petty sessions results for Francis McNamara, I realized that perhaps Miss Mary Bourke of Monanoe Townland filed a petty complaint against "Jack the Tank", since, according to Mary Margaret, the two were "bitter enemies". If so, this complaint would reveal the true name of "Jack the Tank", the tambourine playing musician.

Sduddy
Posts: 947
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: McInerney 1898 postcard from Killawinna to Belgium

Post by Sduddy » Tue Jun 09, 2020 10:52 am

Hi Jimbo

I should have read Bernadette’s story more carefully and noted that Jimmy was born in Ballycotton.

About the fort behind Francis McNamara’s house: when you look at the full 1842 map, you will see that there are several more forts not very far away. I looked at Thomas Coffey’s book, The Parish of Inchicronan (Crusheen), and, on page 10, he has a piece on the forts in the parish: “Westropp, writing in 1901, stated that there were no fewer than thirty-six forts in the Parish of Inchicronan, but on a close examination of the relevant ordnancesurvey maps there are forty-four. Forts are the most common of all our field monuments and there are about 40, 000 of them throughout Ireland. They were not forts in the military sense, but were the protected dwellings of early farmers.”
Thomas Coffey was very interested in Archaeology, and and this is reflected in his book. He gives much more space to the four megalithic tombs in the parish, and goes into quite a bit of detail on these; the forts are much less important – they date from the Bronze age to the 16th century – most of those that have survived are thought to have been built between the 6th and 16th centuries. Coffey says that there is a very interesting Iron Age fort (earthwork) in the townland of Gortnamearacaun, which is protected by a preservation order. It sounds as if the other forts are not protected, but Coffey was writing in 1993, so maybe that’s changed now. It also sounds as if there is a hierarchy among forts, so maybe that’s why the list in the Archeology section doesn’t name all of them.

I love your juxtaposed Griffith’s map and satellite view, which I looked at for ages marvelling, as I always do, at how many fields have remained intact. I don’t have the skills to present map together with satellite view, and even if you explained how to do it, I would still not be able I’m sure.

You are right about the dancing – dances were not held in those enclosures.

At the moment, I’m reading Pioneer Women: voices from the Kansas Frontier, by Joanna L. Stratton, (1981). I’m at page 121, where Stratton says, “At this time, Mitchell County was in full agitation. Officially established in February, 1867, the county was first settled by pioneers in the fall of that year. By the following spring, the white settlement of the area had enlarged and the first clusters of cabins were erected along the banks of the Solomon River. The hostilities in Mitchell County reached a climax during the Summer of 1868 as restless bands of Cheyenne and Sioux looted homes and terrorized the settlers. In August, the tribesmen gathered near the mouth of Plum and Asher Creeks to plot their offensive. After a long parley, they swept down through Solomon River Valley, forcing the local residents to hastily congregate for protection.” I don’t know very much about either American or Australian history, but it’s generally accepted, regarding the Irish, that the irony of settling on lands that did not belong to them, while at the same time greatly resenting British rule at home, was lost on them.

Sheila

Sduddy
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Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: McInerney 1898 postcard from Killawinna to Belgium

Post by Sduddy » Thu Jun 11, 2020 10:20 am

Hi Jimbo

Ther is a passing mention of Fr. John McInerney in this clipping from The Iola Register of 05 May 1955: https://www.newspapers.com/clip/1122591 ... y-in-iola/
St John’s Grows Fast: The Catholic Church, oldest in the Christian world, was one of the latest to be established in Iola. This is a little surprising because the first Holy Mass celebrated in Humboldt was in the year 1857, and Humboldt had a Catholic Church building by 1867. It was not until 1892, however, that the first mass was held in Iola. As a matter of fact, there was precisely one Catholic family in or near Iola at that time – the James McCann family. But Father Wickman from Humboldt arranged to come to the McCann home, first on a farm outside Iola, then at 101 E. Spruce. He offered Mass there regularly until 1900. But if the congregation was small in the beginning and late getting startred, it grew rapidly. In 1900 it became necessary to rent the Woodmen’s Hall on the south side of the square for services. In 1903 the present St. John’s Church was built on the site of the old Methodist Church. This was done during the pastorate of Father MacInnerney. Father McGuire became the first resident past of St. John’s in 1906 and since that time priests have regularly been in charge of the parish. Father John Cody enlarged the church in the late 1930’s and Father Hertel built the St. John’s Parochial School in 1950.
At the present time, the parish has about 550 members, a grade and junior hight school with an enrolment of 150 students. The school is staffed by the Sister of St. Joseph, the same order, which operated St. John’s Hospital here for almost half a century. Fr. F. R. O’Donoghue is in charge of the parish at the present time. He points out that Charlie McCann, son of James McCann in whose house the first Mass was held, still is a member of the church and has therefore lived through and been part of the entire history of the parish.
Sheila

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