Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

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Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Thu Sep 13, 2018 10:54 am

Hi Jim
That’s some headstone alright. Yes, that Patrick is probably the one who was naturalized in 1866.

As our Patrick died at aged 41 in 1882, it’s likely that his brother was still alive in 1901. There are surprisingly few Tierneys in Ennis in 1901 (only 23), but we must bear in mind that Patrick’s brother might also have joined the British army, which gave employment to a lot of people, especially those who lived in urban areas, and was a traditional form of employment in some families – almost like a trade handed down from father to son, so it’s quite possible that Patrick’s brother was not living in Ennis in 1901.
If Patrick’s brother was still alive in 1901, he would be aged 50 – 70, but there’s no Tierney (with a name other than Patrick) aged over 40, so I looked at the deaths registered in Ennis between 1875 and 1901, but found no one who could possibly be a brother of Patrick.There are two, though, who could possibly be the father of Patrick: (1) Thomas Tierney, a married man, from Lysaghts Lane who died in 1878, aged 75; informant Bridget Tierney, Lysaght’s Lane (probably his wife). That Bridget may be the Bridget Tierney, widow, who died in 1896, aged 84, but she died in the workhouse, so again there’s no clue as to any relative.
(2) John Tierney, widower, from Borheen, who died 1892 aged 76, but he died in the workhouse so the informant is not a family member.

I think I will have to get the record for the Mary Tierney who died in 1872. Chances are, of course, that Mary is not the mother of Patrick, and maybe not even from the town of Ennis, or even from the hinterland - Ennis registration district covers a large area of the county.

Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Fri Sep 14, 2018 10:55 am

I read the story of Patrick Keating in The Shanachie: http://feniangraves.net/Tierney,%20Patr ... 2013-4.pdf, and noted that the article had been contributed by Ellen Bohan whose sources were several American newspaper reports. There must be other records on this side of the Atlantic – maybe among the Fenian papers held in Kew: (1) the publication of Tierney’s situation; (2) the appointment of a commission comprising of two members of parliament, Spencer Talbot and Henry Holland; (3) the pardon granted on Nov. 18, 1878.
For the task of finding names of relatives, the most useful of these must be the initial publication of Patrick's case. I checked the British Newspapers Archives site: http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/, and found a thumbnail of an article in the Freeman’s Journal, of 05 December 1878, under the title “The Political Prisoners”: “…and paper having been supplied, the following is a copy of the statement. Written on board the City of Chester, by Patrick Tierney, described by the British warrant as 25 years, born in Ennis, Clare, and convicted in June, ’06, for the contemplated…”
https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co. ... nal&page=0

I doubt that this article, which seems to rely on an account written by Patrick when he was on his way to America, will give any more on his family than we know already from the interviews he gave on his arrival, but I can’t find any other reference to Patrick Tierney’s case - at least not in the Freeman's Journal.

Sheila

Jimbo
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Jimbo » Sat Sep 15, 2018 6:33 am

In May of 1864 a 27 year old Patrick Tierney was bound for New York, a place many an Irishmen knew right well. Patrick's leaving of Liverpool was on a Yankee clipper ship, Davey Crockett was her name, and Burgess was the captain of her, and they say that she was a floating hell.

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903 ... print=true

On the ship register, Patrick Tierney is traveling with two others, most likely siblings: John Tierney (age 16) and Katherine Tierney (age 18).
Attachments
28 May 1864 NY arrival of Ship David Crockett with Patrick Tierney.jpg
28 May 1864 NY arrival of Ship David Crockett with Patrick Tierney.jpg (322.96 KiB) Viewed 3219 times

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Sat Sep 15, 2018 6:40 pm

Hi Jim

I know that song, but never knew that there was really such a ship as the Davy Crockett and that Burgess, the captain of her, was a real person.

Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Sat Sep 29, 2018 11:59 am

Well, I got the civil record of the death of Mary Tierney in 1872. She’s from Clonmoney in the civil parish of Bunratty – and not from Ennis. Plus she is described as unmarried. The staff in Sandfield House went through each registration district within the Union of Ennis, and finally found the death in the book for Newmarket registration district: May 23rd, 1872, at Clonmoney, Mary Tierney, Spinster, aged 65, Labourer; informant: Thomas Gleeson, present at death, Clonmoney.
The baptisms for the Catholic parish of Newmarket shows 6 children born to Pat Tierny and Mary Slevin of Newmarket: Michael b. 1831, Thomas b. 1833, Margaret b. 1837, Pat b. 1839, Anne b. 1841, Catherine b. 1845. The marriages show that a Bridget Tierney married Michael Brien in 1861. The first three of their children are in the Newmarket baptisms: Cornelius O’Brien b. 1861, Martin b. 1863, Patrick b. 1866 (The Newmarket registers, which have survived, go up to 1865, only).
The parish baptisms also show a Mary Tierney baptised in 1840, daughter of Michael Fleming and Mary Tierney.

I can find nothing to show that Patrick Tierney, who died in New Haven in 1878, was related in any way to the Mary Tierney, whose death was registered in Newmarket, Ennis Union, in 1872. So Patrick’s mother was a different Tierney, whose first name we do not know and whose death may not have been registered.
I am reading Eva O Cathaoir’s book, Soldiers of Liberty: A Study of Fenianism 1858-1808, and I’m pleased that it was recommended to me. She includes an appendix, which gives a short bio for 1000 of the men who were in the movement (pp 335-433), of whom 51 are from Co. Clare. This number includes some men who joined the movement late in the 19th century and also some men who were arrested under suspicion of being members, or abetting members, and were soon released. There’s quite of few of the men who gathered at Drumcliff in 1867 and also various others, including Patrick Tierney, whose biographical note gives all the information supplied by Ellen Bohan to the Shenachai magazine, but nothing more. O Cathaoir probably met with the same difficulties that I‘ve met with.

Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Tue Feb 09, 2021 11:46 am

Paddy Waldron, writing about Fenians in West Clare, mentions a Richard O’Donnell among the “Other West Clare Fenians” (http://www.pwaldron.info/fenians/).
The Clare Journal, 30 Oct 1865, included a report taken from the Kilrush Gazette on the proceedings of the Kilrush Quarter Sessions. It seems that a John O’Donnell, Publican, was considered to be keeping “a low ill conducted public house’ and that his house was “the head centre of sedition.” This John O’Donnell might be a relative of Richard, but, of course, O’Donnell is a very common surname:
Kilrush Quarter Sessions. At ten o’clock a.m. on Tuesday Michael O’Shaughnessy Esq. Q C. took his seat on the bench, and proceeded to hear the undefended cases – fifty six – out of 162 entries.
Licences granted, 8; Ejectments, 5; on one criminal case, common assault.
Among the defended cases, there were some sad exhibitions of fraternal disagreements, half brothers and whole brothers, selfish children and close-fisted fathers, trying by legal assistance and subtle ingenuity to over-reach each other.
The Grand Jury. Randal W. Borough; Michael Brew; Richard Foley; N M Lillis; Anthony Nolan; George Blackall; James Quin; Andrew Madigan; William Dalton; Synan McAuliffe; T. Blackall; Michael Behan; Henry Taylor; M Doherty; James Morrissey; T Gibson; J Culligan; Bryan Dwyer; William Crowley; John Chambers; John Green; John Chambers.
Crown Court – Thursday. The chairman in a very eloquent speech complimented the Grand Jury on the peaceable state of the western district. In commenting on the light calendar of Clare, his worship took occasion to remark that there was no appearance of serious crime on the surface of society and sincerely hoped that no disaffection lurked beneath – ready to explode. The chairman next adverted to a slight inclination or tendency to Fenianism which was perceptible in the western district. His worship then drew a vivid picture of the administration of the laws in the present day compared with the manner in which justice was meted out to the poor about sixty years ago. At that time Petty Session courts were unknown – decisions were pronounced in the magistrate’s parlour – the liberty of the press was restricted, and the officials of the country almost irresponsible. How widely different, said his worship, is the administration of affairs in Ireland today. Law, it might be said, was made cheap – and every facility was afforded to the very humblest in the land to obtain redress of grievances wherever they pressed heavily, even on the poorest in society The learned chairman, in a clear and forcible strain, pointed out the liberty enjoyed by the British subject when compared with the privileges enjoyed by the people of other countries. His worship then descanted upon the much-talked of Fenian revolution, which he characterized as the maddest of all the mad schemes that had ever taken possession of a thoughtless, reckless body of people, who would fain overturn the cherished institutions of the kingdom in the futile hope that they might secure some fancied position of eminence in the turmoil, spoliation, and bloodshed that would inevitably follow. The chairman in most effective terms pointed out the ruinous absurdity of such a course: he gave the advice, he said, from the result of long experience and the unshaken conviction in the criminal folly of such proceedings. After alluding to the exotic growth of Fenianism, and the slender hold it has of the great bulk of the Irish people, he warned the enthusiasts for an ‘Irish Republic’ to be wise in time, to abjure their wild proceedings, and not to bring trouble and misery on their families, which was sure to follow such an extravagant and mad career.
Immediately after delivering his charge to the Grand Jury his worship proceeded to grant renewal of Spirit Licences.
Head Constable McCartie, opposed John O’Donnell of Kilkee, in obtaining a renewal of his spirit licence. Mr John Frost, solicitor, resisted the application on the grounds that the defendant kept a low ill conducted public house and that it was futher averred as a cause for withholding the licence, that the defendant’s house was suspected of being the head centre of sedition in the village. And further that the party named and sons, were Agents for the sale of the suppressed ‘Irish People’ newspaper. Mr Chartres B Molony, solicitor, defended Mr O’Donnell. After a long investigation, before a very full bench of Magistrates, their worships did not consider the allegation borne out, and granted a renewal of the licence.
The case elicited peculiar interest, as it was some way connected with the bubble-sound of Fenianism. The chairman said that notwithstanding that the case fell through, still, the police were quite right in being vigilant and on the alert. Kilrush Gazette.
Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Thu Feb 11, 2021 1:16 pm

Clare Journal, Thur 15 Feb 1866:
Fenianism. Just as we were going to Press we are informed that the police have conveyed to the County Jail, in this town, four young men, charged with Fenianism. Three of the arrests were made in Feakle, where the parties reside, and one of them at Limerick Railway Station, as he was proceeding to America.
Clare Journal, Mon 19 Feb 1866:
The Late Fenian Arrests. As we informed our readers in our last issue, four prisoners were brought in by the police, on Thursday evening last, charged with being implicated in the Fenian Conspiracy. It appears five were originally arrested, but one of them, named Patrick Lyddy, became suddenly unwell in Tulla Bridewell, and was unable to be removed. The names of the others are James Conway, Thomas Gallaher, David Duggan, and John Connors. They all reside convenient to Feakle and Tulla. From what we can learn the charge against them is for having used expressions of a disloyal nature, while drinking in a public house, on the occasion of celebrating the departure of one of them (Connors) for America. Mr Bunton, solicitor, was retained by their friends to defend them, and on his application to Mr O’Hara, R. M., the magistrate who signed their committal, attended at the jail on Saturday, and said he would admit them to bail, if sufficient security could be secured. As the parties are all well-to-do comfortable farmers, there is no doubt but the requisite bail will be available. We are glad, for the sake of our county, that the charge is not of the heaviest character.
Clare Journal, Mon 26 Feb 1866:
Arrest of Mr Marcus Keane as a Fenian. We are informed that this gentleman was arrested last week in the county of Kilkenny as a supposed Fenian, but was soon released, on proving proper identity. Some time ago Mr Johnston, of Arranview, was taken up in county of Meath on the supposition of being the Head Centre Stephens.
Troops in Clare. One company of the 73rd Regiment, numbering 80 rank and file, arrived this morning by train from Limerick to take up their quarters in Clare Castle Barracks. The company was commanded by Major Barry, and the other officers are Captain Morse and Lieutenant Benson. A second company is expected to arrive to-morrow.
Clare Journal, Thur 1 Mar 1866:
Fenian Arrests. Richard O’Donnell and Thomas Malony, the former from Kilrush and the latter from Kilkee, were committed to Ennis Gaol, on Wednesday th 27th inst, charged with Fenianism. We believe there is no proof against those parties beyond strong suspicion. They have been arrested under the provision of the Suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act. There are now six persons in our County Jail charged with this offence.
Clare Journal,Thur 8 Mar 1866:
Another Fenian Arrest. A man named Patrick Donnellan of Ballykelly, near Broadford, was brought this day into this town by the Constabulary, and lodged in the County Jail, on the charge of being connected with the Fenian Conspiracy.
Clare Journal, Mon 12 Mar 1866:
The Escape of an Alleged Fenian. Police Investigation in Tulla. On Friday last, a magisterial investigation was held in the Court-house of Tulla into charges preferred against Constable Digby Devenish, of the Feakle Police, and Sub Constable John Regan, of the Caher Station, for having allowed the escape of a man, named Thomas Halloran, at Caher, who was arrested for being implicated in the Fenian Conspiracy. There was also a charge against the constable for neglect of duty in disobeying the orders of his superior officer. The magistrates, who attended to investigate the matter were – Maurice O’Connell, in the chair; Pierce O’Brien, Francis Westropp, Marcus Molony, and William O’Hara, R M, Esqrs. Mr Jennings, County Inspector, and Mr Curling, Sub Inspector, were also present.
Mr Heard, the Sub-Inspector of Tulla, appeared to prosecute the inquiry, and Mr James Hynes, Solicitor, defended the policemen.
It appeared from the evidence adduced that Halloran was arrested in Feakle by Mr Heard, who gave him in charge to Constable Devenish with strict orders to convey him direct to the bridewell of Tulla. Instead of doing so, he stopped on his way at the minor station of Caher, where the prisoner, who was an ex-policeman himself, was not handcuffed or kept in any close restraint, and only one man was placed in the room to guard hm, and this was Sub Constable Regan. During the night, on a very plausible excuse, he was allowed to the door when he bolted closely followed by the constable. But, owing to the night being very dark, and having the lead of his pursuer, he got away by dexterously doubling through the fields. It was shown that the constable returned to the barracks, well-nigh exhausted, with his clothes cut and his hands, arms and legs well-scratched with briars and brambles of the hedges and ditches, he went over in pursuit of his prisoner.
After a most careful investigation, during which Mr O’Connell and Mr O’Hara gave excellent characters to the men charged, the magistrates came to the unanimous decision of fining both men in the sum of £2 for what they considered a dereliction of duty, and gave it, as their opinion that they were convinced that there was no complicity whatever on their part with the Fenian Movement.
Clare Journal, Thur 15 Mar 1866:
Sudden Death. A man named Doogan, whose son is at present in jail on the charge of being implicated in the Fenian conspiracy, died suddenly this morning while proceeding from his home in Feakle to this town. He left his house in his usual good heath, and called on the father of another of the prisoners who was to accompany him. While waiting for this man he dropped dead off the chair he was seated on. Nothing could exceed the grief of his son when the news of his father’s sudden demise was communicated to him.
Clare Journal, Mon 26 Mar 1866:
Stephen Joseph Meany Stumping It. We perceive that this old acquaintance of ours has taken a leading part in the Fenian movement in America. To him has been confided the sale of the bonds! And from what is known of him in monetary transactions hitherto in this country, we believe we are correct in saying that he will prove himself an efficient and trustworthy agent in carrying out the projects of the Brotherhood. As an editor of an American newspaper he wields his pen with fierce bitterness against that country where he suffered a short term of imprisonment for a breach of her unjust laws for making people pay for what they eat; and as a stump orator, he is invaluable for drawing on the sympathies and purses of his auditory, who, perhaps, see in him the honest patriot and unflinching advocate of ‘ould’ Ireland’s wrongs.
At the great Fenian meeting in New York, Mr Meany was introduced by the chairman [a speech by Meany here]. The speaker concluded amid great applause. As long as the Irish are worked upon by such men as Mr Meany, we need not have much dread that the funds collected will go to provide arms or ammunition for an invading army, and we must only pity the unfortunate dupes who are gulled by such stump oratory to applaud the speaker and hand over to his tender mercies their hard-earned dollars.
Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Mon Feb 15, 2021 11:26 am

Some, if not all, of the men who were arrested in February 1866 were released later that year:

Clare Journal, Mon 30 Apr 1866:
A Suspected Fenian Admitted to Bail. Mr Richard O’Donnell, who was arrested in Kilkee early in March, under the suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act, on supposed allegation of Fenianism, was fully admitted to bail, on Friday, by Mr Blake, R M. A similar concession is expected for Mr Thomas Mahony, of Kilrush, who was arrested the same time.
Clare Journal, Mon 4 Jun 1866:
An alleged Fenian admitted to Bail. On Friday last, Edmund Blake, Esq, R M, attended at the county jail, and by directions of the Lord Lieutenant, proceeded to take bail for the release of a young man, named David Duggan who was arrested in February last, under the suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act, near Feakle, where he resided. He was admitted to bail on entering security, himself in £10, and two sureties of £50 each. It was this man’s father who died suddenly when on his way to visit him shortly after he was arrested.
Clare Journal, Mon 25 Jun 1866:
Discharge of an alleged Fenian. A young man named Thomas Mahony, who had been arrested in Kilrush, in March last, under suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act, was last week discharged from the County Jail, by order of the Government. He gave bail by two securities in £150 each and (illegible) self in £100.
I think this must be the same man as the Thomas "Molony", mentioned in the above posting.

Clare Journal, Mon 23 Jul 1866:
Discharge of an Alleged Fenian. On Thursday last William O’Hara, Esq, R.M., Tulla, attended at the county gaol, and admitted to bail James Conway, who had been incarcerated since the 20th of February under the Lord Lieutenant’s warrant, on a charge of being suspected of being concerned in treasonable practices.
Clare Journal, Mon 20 Aug 1866:
Release of a Fenian Prisoner. On Thursday John Connors, of Feakle, county Clare, baker, having obtained permission from the Government to go to America, was delivered over to an escort of constabulary at Kilmainham Prison, whose instructions were to see him embark at Queenstown on board the steamer leaving for New York.
Here are some other Fenian-related items:

Clare Journal, Thur 13 Dec 1866:
The Proclamation of the County. The notices have been issued and published, calling on every person holding arms to lodge same in the Police Barrack of his locality this day (Thursday), or render himself liable to imprisonment for twelve months. The justices to grant licences will be named in a few days.
Clare Journal, Thur 13 Dec 1866:
The Batteries on the Lower Shannon. General Bloomfield has been on a tour of inspection of the batteries on the Lower Shannon from Tarbert to the mouth of the river at Carrigaholt. Additional marines are to be sent to every station, as an augmentation to the present force, and another ship of war to be anchored within the roadstead, near Scattery of Kilrush. The generl found all the batteries in the highest state of efficiency.
Clare Journal, Thur 13 Dec 1866, from the Limerick Chronicle:
Arrest for Fenianism. On Tuesday upon the arrival of one of the trains at the Railway Terminus, Sub-Constable Curran, who has been constantly on duty there, arrested a young man, who appeared to him a stranger, on suspicion of being a Fenian emissary in America. He conveyed him with his luggage to the William street station, where he was examined by Mr Channer. He gave his name as Organ, a native of Miltown Malbay, in the county Clare, whither he was returning from the gold diggings of New Zealand where he acquired by his industry between two and three hundred pounds which he had with him. As there was no Fenian document fournd amongst his luggage, Mr Channer, from his answers, was so satisfied with his innocence, that he immediately discharged the young man, who, we understand, proceeded by the evening train to Ennis, en route to the place of his birth. Limerick Chronicle.
Clare Journal, Thur 3 Jan 1867:
Seizure of Arms at Killaloe. On Monday night Sub-Inspector Bradshaw and a party of police, arrested a man named Scanlon andhis son; and discovered buried in the ground, on the premises, 20 Rifles with Sword bayonets, and some revolvers. The parties were this morning lodged in Ennis Jail. Another son is supposed to have made his escape.
Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Thu Feb 18, 2021 11:37 am

Clare Journal, Mon 4 Mar 1867:
Arrest of a Suspected Fenian in Clare Castle. A young man, apparently about 30 years of age, named John Fitzgerald, was arrested by Sub Constable Coghlan, at Clare Castle, on Thursday, on suspicion of being a Fenian leader or emissary. Bank deposits, receipts, and cheques for £120 were found upon his person. The prisoner was brought before the magistrate at Ennis on the following day (Friday) for examination, when it transpired that he had been employed by Mr Maurice Fitzgerald, the architect of the new asylum in the year 1865. In answer to the Bench, he said that when he was arrested he was in search of employment, and that he was in the habit of lodging his money wherever he had been at work, as it had appeared that some of the lodgements were made in Dublin, Roscrea, and Limerick. He also complained that the had been criticized a good deal by the police when arrested, some of them remarking that he had cut his whiskers so as to avoid the description in the Hue and Cry, and that with regard to height, they did not mind about a few inches; also that he had been a hard working industrious man and thought he had been badly used by being handcuffed and lodged in custody. Mr Blake observed that it would be well if in such cases a constable were sent with the prisoner to a magistrate in order to avoid detention if unnecessary. The police constable of Clare Castle denied that the man had been insulted, and stated that he had not accounted for himself satisfactorily. The prisoner was then discharged, and his money orders and cash book returned to him.
Clare Journal,Thur 7 Mar 1867:
The Fenian Alarm in Ennis. Since our last issue Ennis and the neighbourhood have been in a state of excitement and alarm consequent upon the threatened outbreak of the Fenians in this district. Very exaggerated rumours have prevailed with reference to midnight meetings, and assemblies of armed men in the immediate vicinity of the town. It is a fact, however, that mobs of lawless individuals have infested the neighbourhood, and perpetrated acts of violence greatly to the terror of the inhabitants. In these nightly raids the object appears to have been to get possession of arms and in one or two instances we believe they succeeded. Captain Beresford’s house in Bindon Street was entered by three men on Tuesday night, and a sword and a gun carried off. Seven other houses were visited for the like purpose.
On the same night a detachment consisting of 45 men from the 74th Regiment stationed at Clare Castle was marched into the town and took up their quarters at Pearson’s sales room. The constabulary were under arms during the whole of the night patrolling the town, but nothing of importance occurred. The officials at the various banks, fearing that an attack might be made upon them, kept the whole of the staff of clerks upon the premises. The same precaution was observed on the following night, but no demonstration, we are happy to say, took place. The military were again drafted into the town and the constabulary patrolled the streets as usual; two parties being retained for service at the banks.
On Wednesday the police collected in all the arms, ammunition, &c., from the several gunsmiths, ironmongers, &c., taken all the precautions which circumstances seemed to dictate. The fact of the mails not arriving as usual on yesterday caused the excitement felt in the town to be considerably increased. Notwithstanding the prompt measures taken by the local authorities to meet the threatened danger, it is felt to be absolutely necessary that a greater military force should be stationed in this town, especially as we have commodious barracks at present unoccupied, save by staff of the Militia, and a memorial has been forwarded to the Lord Lieutenant by the magistrates of the town, urging upon his Excellency the necessity of sending troops to garrison the district. No reply has yet been received to this communication which, at the time we write, may be hourly expected.
No overt act, except that to which have referred, has yet been committed by the Fenians in this district, although much alarm is necessarily felt among the inhabitants. In the western part of the county, in the direction of Tulla, profound tranquility prevails. The western districts of the county, however, are in a state of great excitement, and an actual collision has taken place at Kilbaha coast-guard station, which was attacked by a body of men on Tuesday night, and the arms carried off. In the melee one of the coastguards was severely wounded. The insurgent party afterwards marched towards Kilrush.
The military still keep their quarters at Pearson’s salesroom, while the constabulary are scouring the neighbourhood of the town, but their efforts have not been attended with any result of tangible importance. Apparently things are tranquil, but it is felt that appearances cannot be relied upon, and although there is no ground for any unnecessary alarm the authorities may find it very difficult and almost impossible to deal with a set of people who dare not show their heads except under the assurances of perfect safety.
The mobs congregated at Drumcliffe on Tuesday night, where it is rumoured they were drilled by a Captain O’Brien. About 200 persons are said to have assembled on the occasion. But this is mere rumour, for the accuracy of which we do not vouch.
Special Constables. At this conjuncture we would take the liberty of suggesting to our worthy Resident Magistrate, and to the magistrates of the district, the desirability of swearing in special constables from among the respectable and loyal inhabitants of the town: We have no doubt that such a step would have an excellent effect, if only in reassuring the minds of the timid, and making an unmistakeable demonstration calculated to prove what an overwhelming weight of the inhabitants of our town and the district are ready to stand forward on the side of law and loyalty.
Clare Journal, Mon 11 Mar 1867:
Threatened Outbreak of Fenians in the County Clare. Proceedings in Ennis. Since our last publication there has been very little abatement of the alarm occasioned by the threatening attitude assumed by the Fenians in this neighbourhood. That they are in our midst planning and plotting their treasonable schemes there cannot be the least doubt, and the misfortune is that they either cannot or will not see the inevitable ruin they are bringing upon themselves and all who adhere to their miserable cause….. Business is completely paralysed, and nothing is to be seen but persons anxiously inquiring as to probable events, and frequently mounted policemen flying past with important dispatches. The threatened attack is expected from the western part of the county, as the east, towards Tulla, is as yet tranquil. …
Arrival of troops in Ennis. From the comparatively unprotected state of the town, a meeting of magistrates (which at the present moment are of frequent occurrence) took place at the police barrack a few days ago, when it was thought desirable to communicate personally with his Excellency the Lord Lieutenant, and Mr Crowe J P, of Dromore, proceeded to Dublin for that purpose. The result of Mr Crowe’s interview with Lord Naas is now apparent in the arrival, on Saturday, of one company of the Queen’s Royal Regiment, under the command of Captain Hercey, who are quartered in the County Infirmary.
A flying column will be immediately formed at Ennis for rapid movements in the county, which will be composed of two companies of the 74th Highlanders, under the command of Major Irby, one troop of Carbineers, and a section of the Royal Engineers under the command of Captain Fryer. A stipendiary magistrate will be specially attached to this column, and will proceed with the troops wherever required. The two latter detachments arrived in town today, and have been quartered at the militia barracks with a picket in town.
We understand that the Queen’s Own, now in Ennis, will go to Clare Castle to relieve the 74th who are coming in here. Both officers and men of the 74th have been most indefatigable in their exertions, in furnishing patrols and pickets in aid of the civil powers.
Drilling of the Fenians. The patrol on Friday night came upon a number of parties drilling, and the words of command were distinctly heard. A scout gave the alarm, and the Fenians fled in disorder. But for the darkness of the night a number of them would, in all probability, have been captured.
Firing upon the Fenians at Inch. Last night (Sunday) a picket in the direction of Inch, fired upon several persons whom they perceived approaching them in a crouching attitude along the wall. Immediately upon being charged they took to their heels. One of them is supposed to have been wounded.
Finding of Fire Arms. A loaded gun was found near Drumcliffe yesterday disposed in such a manner as to lead to the conclusion that it had been concealed.
Fenian Arrests. The following persons were arrested under the warrant of the Lord Lieutenant, on last night: John Maguire, High Street; Cornelius Hasset, cork-cutter, Jail Street; James O’Halloran, Harness-maker, Mill Street; James Griffin, Tobacconist, Mill street. A person of the name of Nelson connected with some of the Fenian leaders in this district has also been arrested. He had a loaded gun in his possession at the time, which has since been identified as one taken from the house of a farmer in the neighbourhood a few nights previously.
Swearing in of Special Constables. Edmond Blake, Esq, R M., and Thomas Greene, Esq, J P, attended at the Court House this day, for the purpose of swearing in special constables. After having sworn in several of the inhabitants they adjourned their court until tomorrow, when they will also attend for the like purpose. We are confident that our fellow townsmen will flock in large numbers tomorrow to the Court House in order to enroll themselves and thereby prove their desire to preserve the public peace and display that loyalty which is naturally inherent in them.
The Rising in Kilbaha. On Tuesday evening about six o’clock, an attack was made on the Coastguard Station at Kilbaha by a party of five who demanded arms in the name of the Irish Republic. A person named Deloohery (said to be the leader), Fennell, and another man, rushed stealthily on Wilmott, the man in charge of the station. Wilmott finding himself surrounded hastily locked the door with the three men inside, and a hand to hand fight ensued. The party escaped after discharging a revolver and the fire was resumed by Wilmott, with, it is thought, fatal effect. Fennell who it is said has been dangerously wounded has been since arrested and is now under the treatment of Dr O’Donnell, who proceeded today to Kilbaha, to extract the ball from the leg of the unhappy sufferer. A party of police under the command of T Le Bau Kennedy, Esq, S I C, and Head Constabele Eaton and McCartie scoured the country in all directions in pursuit of fugitives.
Clare Journal, Thur 14 Mar 1867:
The Weather. We have had severe weather during the present week, which has practically put an end to spring work for the present. Snow and sleet began to fall on Tuesday, and by Wednesday morning the country was covered with anundeviating white mantle to the depth of several inches. The wind in the meantime blew due east, and was sharp and biting in the extreme. The prospect of a late season, we regret to say, has been verified by the prolonged inclemency of the weather, and the fears instigated by the present Fenian business, which has done more harm to the country than it is possible to appreciate.
Clare Journal, Thur 14 Mar 1867:
The Catholic Clergy on Fenianism. The Right Rev Dr Power, catholic Lord Bishop of Killaloe, addressed the people at great length on Sunday last, from the altar of the church at Killaloe, and heartily congratulated his flock on the fact that they showed and example which is well worthy of imitation in these most perilous times, in wholly abstaining from any identification whatsoever with the foolish and mischievous Fenian movement. His Lordship was heard throughout with profound attention and respect, and his words made a strong impression on all who heard him.
Clare Journal, Thur 14 Mar 1867:
Meeting of the Inhabitants Today. A meeting was convened by requisition of Marcus Talbot, Esq. Chairman of the Town Commissioners, on this day (Thursday), ‘for the purpose of taking into consideration the present unfortunate crisis, and taking steps, if necessary, to offer their support to the authorities for the maintenance of the public peace.’
Clare Journal, Thur 14 Mar 1867:
The Fenian Excitement in Clare. Ennis. Much of the alarm occasioned by the threatened outbreak of Fenians in this town has subsided, though it is still felt hat the military authorities and the constabulary cannot with safety relax their vigilance. The extreme severity of the weather has no doubt done much to assist putting down the movement, and it is to be hoped that the dupes and madmen engaged in the tremendous folly will see how hopeless is their cause opposed to the loyal and well disciplined forces of her Majesty.
The town and neighbourhood is patrolled every night until daylight in the morning both by the military and the constabulary. Great praise is due to both services for their untiring exertions in the cause of law and order. A flying column consisting of carbineers and infantry, continue to scour the country in the vicinity of the town, but as yet they have not succeeded in meeting any of the Fenians. It is significant, however, that stragglers from the country are arriving in the town every day, which afford at leas fair grounds for suspecting that they are some of the men known to have assembled at Drumcliffe and Inch a few nights ago. If this be so it shows how the Fenian bands are melting away.
Major MacDonnell and other magistrates have been indefatigable in their exertions for meeting any emergency that might arise, patrolling the town at night, and in the day time devising means for the public security.
A guard of the constabulary has been placed on the county jail, where the Fenians are imprisoned, and Lord Dunboyne has consented to allow a police force to be stationed at his residence. Knappogue Castle, owing to the untenantable conditions of the neighbouring barracks. The castle is exceedingly strong. His Lordship and his son, the Hon Theobald Butler, have no personal apprehension, as they are kind and courteous towards the people, who in their district have not manifested any Fenian sympathies, nor indeed, in any part of the east of Clare, as far as can be as yet seen. Many of the respectable classes and some farmers have come to town for protection, and none of the sons of farmers have been discovered joining the disaffected.
The constabulary have arrested a man named Nelson, against whom there was a warrant for carrying arms. Sergeant Lynch, in searching about the premises, found concealed in a haystack some fifteen yards from the door of the house, a gun loaded and capped. The charge contained a minie rifle bullet. Two men, named Simon Neavin of Corovoren, and Michael Ryan of Cahercalla, have also been arrested. Neavin is suspected of being concerned in the recent attack made upon the houses in the neighbourhood from which arms were taken. The constabulary visit all houses at night, the occupants of which are in the least suspected.
Special Constables were sworn in at the Courthouse on Monday and Tuesday.
The persons whose houses were visited by the Fenians have been noticed to attend before the resident magistrate with the view of ascertaining whether or not they knew or suspected any of the parties engaged in the attack. In the case of Mr Kelly we now learn that altogether three shots were fired into his house.
On Sunday the Very Rev Dean Kenny, at the Roman Catholic Chapel, denounced Fenianism in strong terms, and warned his flocks of its evil effects.
The firmness and prudence exercised thoughout this trying emergency have had a most salutary effect, and it is now beginning to be supposed that in the course of a short time matters will soften down to their former peaceful condition.
Kilbaha. Wilmot, the coastguard who so manfully defended himself when attacked by the Fenians a few days ago, still survives, and it is hoped will recover. It is stated that five Fenians composed the party who were engaged in the attack upon the station.
Tulla. A Dublin morning journal yesterday announced that a rumour had reached town to the effect that the police barrack at Tulla had been attacked by the insurgents and sacked, and the police severely handled. Upon inquiry, however, we find that the rumour is quite groundless that part of the county Clare being at the present moment profoundly tranquil.
Clare Journal, Mon 18 Mar 1867:
The Fenian Movement in Ennis. The apprehensions of a Fenian rising on St Patrick’s Day, have happily not been realized, although, as far as Ennis is concerned, the greatest precautions have been observed. The town is patrolled nightly both by the military and the police, and since the incidents narrated in our previous issue nothing of any importance has occurred. Early on Sunday morning, however, extensive arrests were made in the town and neighbourhood. The parties were arrested under a magistrate’s warrant, and their names are as follows: Martin Flannery, farmer, Drumcliffe; Thomas Walsh, cooper, Mill Street; Thomas Moran, saddler, Mill Street; Edward McInerney, cart-maker, Market Street; Michael Cunningham, clerk ditto; Cornelius Sullivan, labourer, Currawarane; John Sullivan, stone cutter, Currawarne; Richard Fitzgibbon, labourer, Old Mill Street; Michael Hasset, schoolmaster at Ennis Workhouse; John Tuohy, shoemaker, Church street; John Maloney, mason, Market Street; Stephen Slattery, black smith, Currawarne; Pat Kelly, Ennis; Pat Hickey, servant, Lifford; Pat Moran, saddler, Mill Street; Michael McM[illegible], carpenter, Drumbiggle; Stephen Hehir, carpenter, Turnpike; James McNamara, labourer, Lifford; John O’Neill, Lifford; Thomas Houlihan, labourer, Lifford; James Crowe, shoemaker, Market Street; James H(illegible)t, national teacher, Doora; and Michael Crohan, [illegible], Lifford. It is stated and, we believe, they will be brought up under a specific charge on Friday, and will undergo an examination before the magistrates.
Last night, the County Inspector, D C Jennings, Esq, and Sub-Inspector, A Curling, Esq, patrolled the town and neighbourhood, and found all quiet and peaceable. Indeed the Fenians have in the unusual severity of the weather, if in nothing else, an enemy they cannot resist.
On Friday the Flying Column visited Gort and the neighbourhood where they remained all night. They returned on the following day (Saturday). It is provided with its own butchers, bakers, masons, and carpenters, and all necessary trade implements, so that they are enabled to encamp on any spot where necessary, even if on the top of Mount Callan, in an amazing short space of time.
Major Macdonnell, the indefatigable and energetic Vice-Lieutenant of the county Clare, whose vigourous conduct throughout the whole of the Fenian excitement has had such a good effect in calming the apprehensions of the people, is at present in Limerick.
On Sunday night, the house of Mr Synge, a gentleman of property residing about five miles for this town, in the vicinity of Corofin, was attacked and robbed of arms; and the number of houses throughout this district, which have been reported as robbed of arms, amounts to upwards of 30.
The members of the constabulary who were drafted from the out districts to reinforce their comrades here have, we understand, returned to their respective stations.
Michael Sullivan, one of the persons arrested on yesterday morning, has since been liberated.
Clare Journal, Thur 21 Mar 1867 (Extract):
The following additional arrests were made early on Tuesday morning: James Madigan, barber, Mill Street; Richard Wall, shoemaker, Victoria road; Geo. Dickson, shoemaker, Church street; Pat Crane, harness maker, Jail street; and John Crowe, labourer.
We are informed on undoubted authority, that excepting at Ennis, Kilrush, and Kibaha, there has not been the slightest indication of Fenianism in any part of the county, a circumstance which will doubtless be regarded with satisfaction by every well disposed person in the community.
A meeting of the Board of Superintendence was held at the Jail yesterday to take into consideration the classification of the prisoners arrested for complicity with the Fenian movement. Mr Murphy, Crown prosecutor, has also arrived in Ennis for the purpose of arranging the charges to be preferred against them.
John Burns, late clerk in the employ of Messrs John Norris, Russell and Sons, at Ennis, who, it will be remembered, disappeared about a fortnight ago, and who is supposed to have been at the Fenian meeting at Drumcliffe, has been arrested in Cork, from which place he was brought to Ennis yesterday under an escort of constabulary, consisting of Constable Doyle and Sub Constable Scanlan. Quin, a private of the 74th Highlanders, who deserted some time ago, has been arrested in Limerick. He arrived in town yesterday, and was committed to jail. A man named Hagarty, a cooper, has also been committed to prison for a charge of Fenianism. He was arrested at Ennistymon.
Early this (Thursday) morning Constable Howard and the Newhall police arrested a young man named McInerney on a similar charge. He was taken before Edmund Blake, Esq, R M, and committed to jail. Altogether there are, at the present moment, upwards of 40 persons suffering incarceration in our county jail upon charges connected with Fenianism.
The persons arrested during the past few days will not, in all probability, be brought up for examination before the magistrates at the Court House tomorrow. It has been deemed advisable to investigate the charges preferred against them at the jail.
Clare Journal, Mon 25 Mar 1867:
Local and District News. Charles O’Brien, one of the parties reputed to be present at the late Fenian rising, was arrested at Liscannor by Constable Nulty, and lodged in jail this day.
Sheila
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Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

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Clare Journal, Mon 25 Mar 1867:
Important Investigation at the County Jail.
On Friday a magisterial investigation was held at the jail in this town, into the charge brought against the Fenian prisoners at present in custody. The following magistrates were in attendance – Thomas Greene, chairman; Edmund Blake, R M, Richard Stacpoole, Marcus Keane, Francis Keane, Thomas Keane, James Foster Vesey Fitzgerald, Charles George Mahon, Thomas Pilkington, Dr P Maxwell Cullinan, and Michael Kerin, Esqrs.
A body of constabulary, under Sub-Inspector Curling, was in attendance. The County Inspector, Mr Jennings, was also present.
The usual guard of the 74th Highlanders posted at the jail since the commencement of the Fenian disturbance also did duty and a sentinel was placed at the outer gate to admit none but magistrates, the professional gentlemen engaged, and the representatives of the press.
Mr Alexander Morphy, Crown Solicitor attended on behalf of the crown, and Messrs C B Molony, M Molony, McNamara, Bunton, Hynes and John Cullinan, jun, appeared on behalf of the prisoners, of whom thirty-seven were present most of whom were young lads respectably attired. The arrangements at the jail of the accommodation of all parties concerned were such as to entitle the governor credit and the principal warder, Mr Slattery, told due need of approbation.
Mr Morphy said that this was not a pre[illegible] investigation, but one that he thought would end in having the prisoners now before them sent for trial. On the night of the 5th of March a body of people rose up in arms in various parts of the country. It would appear that people has assembled in arms near this town under the command of a man named O’Brien, whom they called ‘major’ and subsequently proceeded to several houses and made the occupants give up their arms. They intended to make an attack upon the police barrack at Corofin, and one man named Burns, who he believed kept the ammunition and dealt it out to the insurgents when required, suggested to make an attack upon the barrack at Ennis. He was sorry to say that a soldier of a very distinguished corps, the 74th, was amongt these insurgents. He had since been arrested and was now before them. There was also a soldier of the 9th, who was not yet made amenable. There would be evidence forthcoming to show that several visits to houses, which the approvers would describe to them, had occurred. He was sure that it would be satisfactory for the magistrates of the county to know that the attack had not been so serious as in other places. No life had been lost nor any houses scarcely attacked, for, though arms had been demanded and taken nothing occurred that he could altogether term an attack on a house. However it was part of the general rising which had created so much alarm throughout the country, and the sanguinary outrages connected with the general outbreak had rendered this a very serious affair. The parties they had under cognizance in this district were over a hundred men, and he would now call before them a man named Simon Nevin, who was one of those which had been arrested, and afterwards became an approver. There was another man also which had been implicated in the movement named Michael Ryan. He has also proposed to tell what happened on the occasion referred to, and he was also accepted as a witness by the Crown. He would not mince the matter, both Ryan and Nevin were approvers, but he did not see why they would not be entitled to credit, as they would corroborate the overt acts. He would now call Simon Navin.
[The usual practice, when reporting trials, was to omit the questions and report the replies only; this means that the evidence given at trials often sounds a bit disjointed] Nevin - I know a man named Lot Halloran, drapers’ assistant; I saw him on Shrove Tuesday at Corravoren”
Mr C G Molony objected to have the name of Lot Halloran introduced.
Navin re-examined – There was a soldier with him; the number on his cap was 9th; I went with them to Sullivan’s house at Curravoren; I saw John Maguire there, and a soldier; I was not previously acquainted with Maguire, except by sight; I was not previously acquainted with the soldier; could identify him. [The approver here indentified the second soldier he met who did not belong to the 9th, also identifies the prisoner John Maguire;] it was about six o’clock when I saw them at Sullivan’s; I only remained at Sullivan’s a few minutes; no one left the house with me; I know John Burns, the publican, of Ennis; I saw him on that evening; that was about eight o’clock; it was when leaving Sullivan’s a second time that I met Burns; the soldier now present of the 74th was then with me; I see John Burns here; identifies him; Burns spoke to me; I was coming to Ennis, but did not come after I met him; it was in consequence of what he said to me that I stopped; I went to Curravoren then; the soldier and Burns went back with me; I know Cornelius and James Sullivan; I saw them that evening at Sullivan’s door; they had arms; Cornelius and James Sullivan joined us; we then went to the cross of Curravoren; the two soldiers, the Sullivans, Burns and I, we called at Stephen Slattery’s; Slattery came out with us; we went to Pat Burn’s, John Kildea’s, and Martin Quigly’s; neither Burns, Kildea, or Quigly went with us; I saw Burns and Kildea but did not see Quigly; the soldier of the 74th had a gun; we then went on a couple of hundred yards; Burns then brought me across the fields at Knockaderry to the widow Halloran’s; Burns told the soldier to take charge of the men; I went into the Widow Halloran’s house; saw Dick Fitzgibbon there and the woman of the house; Fitzgibbon was assorting caps of a gun; Burns told him to choose big caps; Burns took the caps; Fitzgibbon and Burns left the house with me; Fitzgibbon had a gun; we went to Michael Carmody’s farm yard; we met the men there who were in charge of the soldier; that is Pat Hickey, the two Sullivans, Slattery, the soldier, and Corney Sullivan; identifies Cornelius Sullivan; Pat Kelly was also present; identifies him; Michael Crohan was there; identifies him; they were cleaning their guns; we remained there near an hour; Lott Halloran came; in consequence of what Lott Halloran said I went to the Ballycoree bridge; John Maguire met us before we went to Ballycoree; from the timber bridge of Ballycoree we went back to the village of Ballycoree; Maguire said there were more of the Ballycoree men there, and to go back for them; Burns and Maguire knocked at the doors of the houses; they knocked at Michael Macnamara and told the people to get up and dress themselves; they asked for arms; we then went near Martin Flannery; three or four went with us who were not with us before; I only knew two of them – John Bunce and Michael Macnamara; we then went towards Drumcliff church; Marin Flannery showed us the way to the church; did not meet Martin Flannery until we met him between his house and Drumcliff church; we told us he would show us the way; identifies him; we followed him; we met some other persons on the road near Mr Sheehan’s house; we met about fifty; we went towards Mr Fetherstone’s gate two deep; the man they called Major O’Brien told us to march two deep; I think it was after ten o’clock then; Major O’Brien was with the fifty me; about ten or twelve joined us at the gate; the party with the Major had weapons; the greater part of them had weapons, guns and pikes; there were then up to about a hundred present; about sixty had weapons; the men were counted by O’Brien; in the field in front of Featherstone’s gate the men were counted; Ned McInerney was the only one that joined us in the field; he spoke to the Major who asked him where were his men, and he said they would not come with him; we all came out two deep on the road, the Major and the soldier of the 9th ordered us to march out; we then went towards the burial ground of Drumcliffe; the Major placed George Dickson, James Crowe, John Miller, and myself in front; Quin, the 74th man, and Miller were in front; we went to a house, I believe Kearse’s; we got nothing there; I went in myself and ten or twelve others; Crowe, Dickson, and the two soldiers went in with us; we asked for arms, but got none; we then went towards Ballygriffey to Mr Jeremiah Kelly’s house; I went into the house along with Geo Dickson and James Crowe. Mr Kelly was upstairs, and spoke down to us. We got a gun and I took it away myself. We then returned to the cross near Ballygriffy. Pat Donovan, Charley O’Brien, and John Walsh joined us there. We then marched to Corofin. We stopped at this side of Corofin. Major O’Brien told us to stop. We went into a house, nine or ten of us. We then put down a fire to warm ourselves. We were going in and out. Don’t know the name of the man of the house. Would know the soldier of the 9th again. At Featherstones’s gate I also met Tom Pinder, Patrick Hickey, John Malone, Edward McInerny, John Walsh, Pat Donovan, Charles O’Brien, Pat Mungovan, Corney Sullivan, the stone-cutter, James Sullivan, Cornelius Sullivan, who is here present, Stephen Slattery, Pat Kelly, Michael Crohan, John Maguire, John Burns, Stephen Hehir, Richard Fitzgibbon, Thomas Moran, John McInerney, Michael Hassett, a man named Rochford, John Cunningham, Michael Cunningham, Pat Hagarty, Thomas Walsh, James O’Halloran, Lot Halloran, a man named Nelson, Michael Ryan, John Tuohy, John O’Neill, John McMahon, Michael McMahon, James Macnamara and Thomas Hanrahan. I don’t remember any other person. Mixed with others, Martin Flannery walked in front, and said he would show them the way. Saw no weapon in his hand anytime that night. He did not go to the place. We halted at Corofin. He left us at Mr Sheehan’s. I heard him say nothing before he left us. Nelson, Doyle, and Molony were with me to Corofin. [cross-examination of Nevin, by Mr C B Molony and by Mr James Hynes, here]
Saturday. At eleven o’clock the investigation was resumed at the jail. On the motion of Edmond Blake, Esq, R M, seconded by Marcus Keane, Esq, J P, the chair was taken by Thomas Greene, Esq, J P. The magistrates present were Edmond Blake R M; the Hon Theobald Butler, Marcus Keane, F N Keane, Charles G Mahon, Dr P Maxwell Cullinan, Alexander Bannatyne, Thomas Keane, Michael Kerin, Thomas Studdert, James F V Fitzgerald, D L, and Pierce O’Brien, Esqrs.
[Some further cross examination of Nevin here.] Some discussion arose as to how Nevin had named and identified the prisoners, after which Michael Ryan, the second approver, was next introduced, when he was examined by Mr Morphy – I left Cahircalla, where my residence is, on Shrove Tuesday evening, about 9 o’clock; James Doyle, of Drumbiggle, was with me. He had a pike. I saw him that evening in my house at 7 o’clock. We went to Cahircalla cross, where we met three others, John Nihil, Pat Crean, and Richard Wall. Nihil had a pike, Wall had a pike, Crean had no weapon. I also met James Madigan. We went towards Drumcliffe. Before we came to Drumcliffe we turned in at Featherstone’s gate to a field. We met a great number of persons. I knew Charles O’Brien. I saw the man called Major O’Brien. Richard Fitzgibbon, Stephen Hehir, Lot Halloran, a soldier of the 9th, Cornelius Sullivan, stonecutter, another Cornelius Sullivan, Stephen Slattery, John Molony, John Walsh, Martin Flannery. There were about one hundred present. About forty armed, twenty with pikes and twenty with guns. They went up to the rear of the burial ground of Dromcliffe. We marched two deep like soldiers, by order of O’Brien. We went towards Corofin two deep. A good many went home from Featherstone’s gate. Some of our party went to take guns. We halted near village of Corofin. I did not know any one which went to take arms but Simon Nevin of Corrovoran (This was the other approver.) We went into a house near Corofin. About six or eight went in to take a drink of water and get lights for our pipes. This was far into the night. John Burns went into the house with me. There was a candle lighted. Burns was distributing ammunition to some of the parties who were inside. The men were going in and out of the house. We went within a hundred yards of the village of Corofin. The major was with us. The party did not appear to take orders from anyone. The major told us to come down from the cross of Corofin. It was the major who ordered us to stop at the cross. Saw no one in command but the major. I don’t know that anyone gave orders to take arms. Some of our party went into Corofin. The major ordered them in. They returned and told him there was no one on the street. The major and three others left us, two of them were soldiers. The major told us if we heard a shot fired in Corofin to rush in. The major went in to bring a proper account if anyone were on the streets. He said we would take the police barrack. At Drumcliffe the major said as we were not strong enough to take the police barrack at Ennis to go to take the barrack of Corofin. We did not attack the barrack at Corofin. The major after going into Corofin, returned no more for us. I then went home. I met two boys near the cross of Dysert, O’Brien and Shannon. They had two double barrelled guns. There were eight or nine with me at the time. They wanted us to go back and take the barrack of Corofin, and they would help us. The witness here identified the prisoners named by him, of whom all were present except nine, namely, John Nihil, Lot Halloran, Charles O’Brien, Major O’Brien, the soldier of the 9th, Corneilus Sullivan, stonecutter, John Walsh, and O’Brien and Shannon, who were met on the road near Dysert. [Cross examination of Ryan here.] Dr Cullinan called on Mr Murphy and said that as far as he could see, the evidence did not appear to him to involve the prisoners beyond the charge of misdemeanour. He wished to know if Mr Murphy intened to define the particular charge on which he relied for information.
Mr Murphy observed that the time did not arrive for him to make an application for a committal against the prisoners on a specific charge, and even that it had, he would be slow to suggest any particular course to the bench, but he thought the evidence might extend beyond the charge of misdemeanour.
The depositions of the approver having been read over to him he signed them with his own hand as did Nevin the other approver also.
Patrick Brody was next examined, in corroboration of the former testimony by Mr Morphy. His evidence was to the effect that he lived at the cross, near to Corofin, and that on the night in question, several armed bands entered his house, where they remained for a considerable time. They said they were Fenians.
This witness was not cross-examined.
The Inquiry then adjourned.
This Day. At 11 o’clock the court sat. The following magistrates were present – Thomas Greene, Chairman; Edmund Blake, R M, Dr P Maxwell Cullinan, Thos Keane, F N Keane, Charles Studdert.
The Chairman asked Mr Murphy to proceed, as the court was prepared to hear him.
Mr Murphy said that he closed his case, and called on the bench to commit the prisoners for trial.
Mr Hynes required to have Nevin brought up in order that he would ask him a few questions.
Mr Murphy objected, but the court ruled he would be produced, in order to be examined, relative to circumstance and facts which had not already been stated by him, but subject to Mr Murphy’s objections.
Nevin was then introduced but was not examined, as Mr Hynes waived his privilege.
Mr C B Molony rose and said that he would on his observation for the defence rely on the law of the case and he would cite a number of decisions given by some of the most eminent judges of the Irish Bench, to show that the uncorroborated evidence of an approver or approvers could not be relied on. He need not, he hoped, tell the court any member of approvers could not, by deposing to the same thing, he regretted as corroborating one another – Ryan the approver was admittedly a man who had violated his oath of allegiance twice as he had been enlisted on two occasions in the militia. He had also violated his oath as a Fenian, for he had admitted that the had been a sworn Fenian. Under such circumstances it would be utterly out of the power of the court to attach credit to his uncorroborated testimony. Nevin’s testimony could not be relied on as he had foresworn himself, for no one could believe that he had sworn truth, when he stated that he had been forced to go to the meeting at Drumcliffe. If there at all, it was clear he went there in the capacity of an informer, as he alleged that he went through the crowd at Fetherstone’s field for the purpose of recognizing the persons present. Nevin swore that he did not see Ryan after they had gone to Ballygriffy, and then that he saw him in a horse and car, but not after, whereas Ryan deposed that he had seen Nevin near Corofin several hours after he had been in Ballygriffy, and that he had been speaking to him there. That was not a mere discrepancy but a palpable contradiction which showed the reckless character of the evidence of these men. With regard to the fact that two or more approvers could not corroborate one another, he would read for the court the decisions of the learned judges he had referred to, amongst them was the decision of that eminent Judge Justice Perrin. After the law laid down in the extracts, which he (Mr Molony) had read, he did not think it necessary to dwell further on that portion of the case, except to say that the approvers had not been corroborated in a single fact by Brady who had been examined on Saturday which legally could be looked on as corroboration. The great principal of British law was to presume every man innocent until proved guilty: and he (Mr Molony) would not require more for his clients that what the law allowed, but this much he required, and then he was sure the court would concede to the prisoners. It was obvious that Nevin had been guilty of great recklessness with respect to the case of McInerney who had been acquitted on Friday. Nevin at first identified him, and subsequently he stated that he believed he was not the man alleging as a reason for his contradiction and precaution that he first indentified him when he was standing behind McInerny’s back. Taking this to be the case, it only showed that the approvers utter recklessness to attempt to identify any man without being sure of his identity. He hoped the court would not rely on evidence emanating from so foul a source, especially when uncorroborated. He would be able to produce Sergeant Doyle, of the police force, to prove that one of the parties alleged to have been at Dromcliffe on the night of the 5th, could not have been there at the hour alleged by Nevin. That young man was John Cunningham, and he would also be able to produce Mr Morely who would dispose as to the hour he had left off business and quitted Mr Russell’s office, where he had been employed, may respectable witnesses could be produced on behalf of many of the prisoners, and surely these respectable witnesses were entitled to as much credit as common approvers. They would prove that it was utterly impossible that many of the prisoners could have been there at the hour alleged. If the approvers were disbelieved in some case, it would be unsafe to rely on them in any. One fact might illustrate the nature of the evidence of the approvers. It appeared that Nevin had sworn he had never had contradiction or falling out with John Cunningham, but the contrary was the fact, as he had accused Cunningham of having reported on the Clare Journal the charge brought against him for ciminal assault on a female, and had attempted to strike him. He would now call his witnesses and would rely on the justice of the court to consider all the circumstances of the cases before them. (The investigation is still proceeding).
Clare Journal, Thur 28 Mar 1867:
Committal of the Fenian Prisoners. Investigation at the Jail. The Court assembled at eleven o’clock on Monday morning, and consisted of the following gentlemen: - Thomas Greene (chairman); Edmund Blake, R M; Marcus Keane, Thomas Keane, Francis N Keane, Dr P Maxwell Cullinan, Charles George Mahon, and Charles Studdert Esqrs.
Mr Alexander Morphy, Crown Solicitor, appeared on behalf of the Crown, and Messrs C B Molony, M Molony, Hynes, McNamara, Bunton, and John Cullinan, jun., on the part of the prisoners.
Mr C B Molony having addressed the Court on behalf of the prisoners, the following evidence was called for the defence:
Miss Isabella Musgrave deposed that she was the step daughter of Francis Lally, and that she lived with him and occasionally attended at the bar; she saw the prisoners, Michael and John Cunningham, there on thennight of the 5th between ten and eleven o’clock; she also saw Michael Hassett; he was in the house from an early hour in the evening, and remained until twenty minutes past ten; he inquired what the hour was, as he used to be particular, in order to be in time at the workhouse, when he was a teacher.
Miss Maryanne Lally, examined by Mr C B Molony – Corroborated the testimony of the former witness, and both witnesses were cross examined by Mr Morphy.
Mr Francis Lally, examined by Mr Michael Morphy, said that Hassett was in his house up to the time specified by the former witnesses; that he keeps a bagatelle table; said that the two Cunninghams were in his house until a few minutes past eleven o’clock, when he requested the parties to retire, as he feared lest a new game would be commenced. The witness further stated that he always closed his door at eleven o’clock, but that it generally takes a little time to clear out the house. He and some members of his family were to perform a religious duty at chapel next day, which made her particular in wishing to get parties out of the house, and also caused him to recollect the circumstances of their being there.
Cross-examined by Mr Morphy – I always close my front door at eleven o’clock; I saw no revolvers or arms in my house that night.
John Carmody, the bagatelle marker – Corroborated the former evidence with regard to the parties being in the house up to eleven o’clock, and a little time longer.
Mr Thomas McDonnell examined by Mr C B Molony – Deposed to having seen the two Cunninghams between ten and eleven o’clock at Lally’s house. It was near eleven when he say them last.
Mr Michael Alfred was examined by Mr C B Molony. He said that he knew John Cunningham, and had been in the habit of visiting him; he recollected Shrove Tuesday evening, and was in the house of Mrs Houlihan; he met John Cunningham there, and remained with him till about ten o’clock; he (Cunningham) could conveniently get home from Lally’s house.
Mr Michael Molony, solicitor, was examined with reference to the character of Michael Cunningham, and he stated that during several years that he was in his employment as clerk. He was exceedingly well conducted, an had no reason to suspect his loyalty.
Mr Michael Cunningham, the father of John Cunningham deposed that his son was in on the night in question at about a quarter or twenty minutes past eleven; and that he had slept with him himself, and that he could not have been at the Drumcliffe gathering.
Mr Hynes then addressed the bench of the parties for whom he was concerned, and referred to what, in his opinion, was the course to be followed by the bench in this particular case. He also bore testimony to the great fairness with which his friend Mr Morphy had conducted the case, and urged the magistrates to consider the respectability of the witnesses called for the defence, upon whose evidence, he was quite sure, they might confidently rely. After going minutely into the testimony of the approvers, and pointing out to the bench the inaccuracy of some statements made by them, he made a powerful appeal on behalf of the prisoners, and concluded his able speech by endeavouring to show, that if they were eventually committed they were entitled to bail.
Michael Macnamara was examined by Mr Hynes, his evidence being to the effect that on the night of Shrove Tuesday he was forced out of his bed by a number of men, none of whom he identified, except Flannery whose voice he recognized.
In answer to a question from the bench the witness said that he could not include Flannery among the party, and that he was there like himself very unwillingly.
Michael Molony was next examined by Mr Hynes. His evidence was to the effect that Flannery was compelled by the party to go with them, what he overheard one of them say that he should be fetched.
Miss Mary O’Halloran, sister of the prisoner, James O’Halloran, deposed to her being in her brother’s house, between ten and eleven o’clock, with him.
Miss Margaret O’Halloran, another sister, deposed that she was in his company in his house up to half past ten.
Some other credible witnesses corroborated this evidence.
In the case of the prisoner, Thomas Moran, his mother, Mrs Moran, and a witness named Patrick Hoare, deposed that the young man had gone to bed at about nine o’clock, and that he had not left the house on the night of the 5th, until morning.
The witnesses were cross-examined by Mr Morphy as in the other cases.
Mrs McMahon, mother of the prisoner, Michael McMahon, deposed that her son was in her house at about nine o’clock in the evening when he joined them in the rosary, then he went to bed about eleven o’clock when she fastened the door, and that on the next day, Ash Wednesday, he and she attended chapel together to perform religious duties.
Thomas Kenny, clerk to Mr John Petty, deposed that he was no relation to the prisoner, that he lodged in his mother’s house and that he saw him go to bed on the night of the 5th about eleven o’clock.
Mrs Hassett, of Clare Castle, mother of the young man Michael Hassett, stated that her son slept in her house at Clare Castle, on the night of the 5th.
Mr Thomas McMahon, victualler, on being examined, said that he saw the prisoner, John Molony, after ten o’clock in the street, and also that he walked with the prisoner, Edward McInerney, to the door of his sister’s house at about half-past ten, or eleven a little later, but at all events at half-past ten.
At this stage of the proceedings the solicitors for the defence, on consulting with each other, agreed on closing for the defence.
Mr Michael Molony then addressed the court on behalf of the prisoners for whom he appeared [a long speech by Mr Molony here, during which he refers to Michael McInerney and Martin Flannery as having already been discharged: “…and I will go further and say, that a bench of magistrates ought not to subject any man to the indignity of a trial upon informers testimony, however, consistent, if it is displaced by satifactory and unimpeachable witnesses. But what class of informers testimony have we here? It is sustained, consistent, not contradictory in itself? I say it has not these attributes; it has been utterly broken down in some cases; you have already refused to believe it, when you discharged Michael McInerney and Martin Flannery." Mr Molony also makes a passing mention of “Charivari”: “It has been thrown out that these people at Lally’s may mistaken as to the night these young men were there, you all know that I prove Tuesday night is specially remarkable in this town, for a custom prevails of have a ‘Charivari’ of old pots and pans throughout the streets, intended I believe as a mark of disapprobation towards those who remain in ‘single blessedness.’" This speech by the defence was followed by another long speech by Mr Morphy for the prosecution.] The magistrates then retired for consultation, and after being absent about half an hour they returned into court, when the Chairman pronounced their decision as follows: After a patient and careful investigation, which has lasted three days, the magistrates have been able to retire to consider their decision, and it only remains for me now to announce to you what that decision is. While determined at the same time to give you the benefit of any extenuating circumstances connected with the case, we cannot forget the enormity of the offence with which you stand charged; and I am bound to observe that you have been ably defended by the professional gentlemen engaged on your behalf, and the crown prosecutor (Mr Morphy) has not only given the court the assistance of his great experience, but he has dealt mercifully with the case not unduly pressing anything against you. It is my painful duty, therefore – and I very much regret, as every one must, to see so many of my fellow-townsmen placed in your position – to commit you for trial. In the case of Madigan and Crane, the magistrates do not think that any evidence has been brought against them, except that they met in the street. Under those circumstances no informations will be granted against them. I may also state that the question of bail has been considered, which the magistrates decline to accept, leaving it to you to apply to the authorities in the usual way.
Mr M Molony – Does that apply in every case?
The Chairman – Yes.
An order for the discharge of Madigan and Crane was at once made out, and they were at once set at liberty.
The Court then rose.
The following are the names of the parties committed for trial: John Burns, James Halloran, John Macguire, Cornelius Sullivan, James McNamara, Pat Hickey, Ned McInerney, Quin, the soldier of the 74th, Stephen Slattery, Thomas Welsh, Patrick Hagerty, Stephen Hehir, John Tuohy, John O’Neill, John Nelson, James Rochford, Michael Hasset, John Cunningham, Michael Cunningham, Dick Fitzgibbon, Patrick Kelly, Thomas Moran, John McMahon, Michael Crohan, Richard Wall, Thomas Hanrahan, James Doyle, George Dickson, John Molony, John Crowe, James Crowe, Michael McMahon.
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Wed Feb 24, 2021 11:26 am

Clare Journal, Mon 1 Apr 1867:
Arrest of a Medical Gentleman at Carrigaholt on a charge of High Treason. We learn with much surprise that Dr Keogh, of Carrigaholt, has been held under a rule of bail for high treason, for attending Fennell, the wounded Fenian prisoner, at Kilbaha. The medical gentleman has a female patient under his charge for some time past at the house in which Fennell took shelter, and on leaving his patient was asked to look at the wounded man. Can it be on such a charge that the respected gentleman is arrested?
Clare Journal, Thur 4 Apr 1867:
Movement of troops. The 74th – On Monday two Companies of the 74th Highlanders changed quarters – one proceeded, at 9.50 a.m., played to the Station by the band, to Clare Castle, the other to Ennis, to relieve Companies which arrived at Limerick by the 5.30 p.m, same day train from those places. The band played the return Companies to the New Barracks at Prospect Hill.
Clare Journal, Mon 8 Apr 1867:
Movement of Troops. The mounted division of the Clare flying column have made Killaloe their headquarters for the present. They arrived on Wednesday from Thurles. The column is composed of sixty five men of the 10th Royal Hussars under the command of Colonel Baker C B; Acting Brigade-Major Russell, Captain O R Slack and Coronets the Hon H Creighton and Hon H Wood. The latter (the officers) are quartered at the Royal Hotel and the men and horses are billeted on the townspeople.
On Saturday morning a troop of the 6th Dragoon Guards (Carbineers) forwarded by train from Limerick to Cahir to join the headquarters of the Military Train stationed there and the detachment of the Military Train stationed here for the last three weeks since the flying column was established for Limerick and Clare, proceeded by train to the Curragh.
On Friday the company of the 6th Carbineers attached to Major Irby’s flying column quitted th militia barrack, Ennis, and proceeded to Limerick in consequence of the service of the column having been dispensed with by Major MacDonnell, Vice Lieutenant. The troop has been replaced at the barrack by a company of the 74th Highlanders which is the only military force to be kept in Clare at present.
Clare Journal, Thur 18 Apr 1867:
The Fenian Attack on the Kilbaha (Clare) Coastguard (Munster News). A pursuit and capture of interest and consequence have been affected by two of the active constabulary at Carrigaholt. On Saturday last whilst Sub-Constables Cronin and Sheenan were on duty at Kilballyowen, about four miles from the station, the observed a man crossing the fields, and some intuitive suspicion excited by his appearance they hailed him civilly. He however affected to take no notice of them, but went on his way with apparent unconcern. But the policement were not so easily deceived. They resolved to accost the individual, and when he saw them advancing he quickened his pace. So too did they. Then he began to run, and they followed him, and the example. He was soon at the top of his speed rattling along at the rate of a steeplechase, and taking the jumps in the best style of fencing. Evidently the young man thought to exhaust or outstrip the policemen. But legs and lungs are well plied and breathed along the hills and vallies of Kerry; and both the officers being, we guess, natives of that county, they were the more enabled to overtake the fugitives, upon whom they laid hands after a long chase over the country. He proved to be Patrick Fitzpatrick, declared to be one of the reputed Fenians by whom the Kilbaha Coastguards were attacked in March last. He was at once conveyed into Kilkee, and thence escorted to Kilrush, where he was lodged in Bridewell that evening, illfated so far as having attracted the notice of the shrewd Kerrymen and deceived in the hope that he could run them out. By the police parties of Carrigaholt and Kilkee, under command of Head Constable McCartie, one of the steadiest and truest of officers and men in any station or service, the whole of the Peninsula down to Loophead has been traversed night and day for weeks, with but brief intervals of sleep and rest. Munster News.
Clare Journal, Thur 25 Apr 1867:
Local and District News. Committal of Fenian Prisoners. On Yesterday Head Constable Eaton, with seven other members of the Kilrush constabulary, arrived in Ennis in charge of Thomas Fennell and Patrick Fitzpatrick, who have been committed for trial at the ensuing assizes, for an attack upon the Kilbaha Coastguard Station. They had also in charge a third man, named James Keane, who has also been committed for trial on the charge of harbouring and concealing Fennell. The whole of them were safely lodged in the county jail.
Clare Journal, Thur 25 Apr 1867:
Constable John Moore, of the Summer Hill station, Nenagh, arrested on Thursday last a young man who describes himself as a discharged National Schoolmaster, names James Dowdall, from Drummin, county Clare. For some days the constable had been narrowly watching the stranger’s movements and having compared the appearance with a description in the Hue and Cry; and ascertaining that it was chiefly at night that he emerged from his lodgings in Chapel lane. Constable Moore took him in charge on suspicion. The prisoner gave an unintelligible account of himself when arrested.
Clare Journal, Mon 29 Apr 1867:
The Fenian Prisoners in Ennis Gaol. In the Court of Queen’s Bench, on Saturday last, Mr Michael O’Loghlen instructed by Mr Michael Molony, applied in the court for an order on the Clerk of the Crown for the county of Clare, to bring up the informations sworn against the prisoners confined to Ennis Gaol, on a charge of assembling at Drumcliffe. Mr O’Loghlen stated the object of the application was to put himself in a position to apply to have the prisoners discharged on bail. The application was granted.


Clare Journal, Mon 6 May 1867:
Local and District News. The Prisoners in Ennis Jail. It is now definitely known that such of the prisoners as the Crown intends to bring to trial will be held over to the assizes, and not to the Special Commission at Limerick, as was generally expected.
Clare Journal, Thur 9 May 1867:
The Fenian Prisoners in Ennis Jail. Three of the prisoners charged with being concerned in the Fenian rising at Drumcliffe, on the night of the 5th of March, and recently confined to the county jail, have been admitted to bail. The names of these persons are Michael Cunningham, John Cunningham, and Michael Hassett.
Clare Journal, Mon 13 May 1867:
The Fenian Prisoners in Ennis. Of the 45 Fenian prisoners confined in the county jail, the following have been admitted to bail: John Cunningham, Michael Cunningham, Michael Hassett, James Halloran, and Thomas Walsh. The following are also to be discharged on bail this day (Monday): Michael McMahon, Stephen Haire, Thomas Hanrahan, John Molony, Edward McInerny, John Crowe, Pat Moran, Richard Walle, James Cronan, Pat Hagarty, James Rochford, Pat Hickey, John Tuohy, Michael Croneen, John McMahon, Pat Kelly, John O’Neil, Clare Journal, Cornelius Sullivan, and James McNamara. Bail has been refused in the cases of the following persons: Charles O’Brien, George Dixon, Richard Fitzgibbon, and Stephen Slattery. No application for bail has yet been made on the part of the remaining fourteen persons, or for the three persons confined under the Habeas Corpus Act.
Clare Journal, Thur 16 May 1867:
Local and District News. Apprehension under the Habeas Corpus Suspension Act. A man named John Flood, of Sixmile Bridge, described as somewhat extraordinary character, was committed to the county jail on yesterday (Wednesday), under the Lord Lieutenant’s warrant, on suspicion of Fenianism. He was conducted from Sixmile Bridge by an escort of police, under the command of John Donovan,
Esq, S.I.
Clare Journal, Thur 16 May 1867:
Release of Fenian Prisoners on Bail. A number of young men whose names we announced in our last issue, charged with complicity in the Fenian rising at Drumcliffe on the night of the 5th of March, were released on bail on Tuesday. Upon gaining their liberty the friends of the prisoners, who certainly looked none the worse for their confinement, got up a sort of ovation, on a small scale, by way, we presume, of welcoming them back to their homes. There still remains seventeen prisoners in the gaol, charged with complicity with the Fenian movement, three of whom are detained under the Lord Lieutenant’s warrant.
Clare Journal, Thur 23 May 1867:
Surrender of an Alleged Fenian. James Sullivan, a stonecutter, charged with complicity in the Fenian rising at Dromcliffe, on the night of March the 5th, and for whose arrest a warrant was issued, surrendered himself to the police yesterday. He was taken before Mr Blake, the resident magistrate, and remanded for eight days. He was afterwards lodged in the County Jail.
Clare Journal, Thur 30 May 1867:
Identification of Sullivan the Alleged Fenian. On Tuesday an inquiry was held at the county jail before Edmond Blake, Esq, R M, into the case of James Sullivan, charged in the information of Nevin, with being one of the party which appeared in arms at Drumcliffe on the night of the 5th of March, for whose apprehension a warrant had been issued, and who surrendered himself to the police on the 22nd instant. The informer was brought up by the 11.30 o’clock train from Limerick for the purpose of indentifying him. Nevin’s first depositions were about to be read when Mr C B Molony, who appeared on behalf of the accused, objected to this course and asserted his right to have the informer examined and his depositions to this particular case taken, ‘de novo.’ The court assented, and having heard a portion of Nevin’s fresh testimony in which, it is stated, there was a most post positive and material contradiction of his former swearing, the inquiry was adjourned, and the prisoner remanded for eight days in order that Mr Morphy, Crown Solicitor, might be present to conduct the proceedings.
Clare Journal, Mon 3 Jun 1867:
Release on Bail of Another Fenian Prisoner. In the Court of Queen’s Bench, on Saturday, Mr M O’Loghlen moved that the prisoner, Keane, who was charged with harbouring a man named Farrell, who was one of a party that attacked the coastguard station of Ballyknockane, county of Clare, on the 5th of March, should be admitted to bail. The prisoner did not deny the harbouring, but Farrell was an old man, and badly wounded and he could scarcely turn him out. Mr Longfield, Q C, appeared for the crown, and did not oppose the motion which was granted.
Clare Journal, Mon 10 Jun 1867:
The Case of James Sullivan. We understand that the magistrates who heard the evidence against James Sullivan, at the County Gaol, on Tuesday last, for complicity in the recent Fenian movement, have transmitted to the Attorney-General their recommendation to admit the prisoner to bail, which we have no doubt will be at once acceded to.
Clare Journal, Thur 13 Jun 1867:
Bailing Fenian Prisoners. On Thursday E Blake, Esq, RM, attended at the County Gaol, Ennis, in compliance with the order of the Queen’s Bench, made on the application of Mr Hynes, to receive bail on behalf of James Keane, who was charged with harbouring Fennell after the attack on the Coastguard Station on the 5th March. Keane having entered into recognizances – himself in £50 with Thomas Keane, Esq, JP, and James Hynes, Esq, as sureties, in £25 each – was released from custody, to abide his trial if called upon at the next assizes.


Clare Journal, Mon 17 Jun 1867:
Recognition of Merit. We are happy to announce that Sub-constable Whooley, of Kilrush, has been presented with a badge of merit accompanied by a pecuniary reward for his vigilance and activity in rearresting Michael Murphy, the alleged Fenian, who succeeded in making his escape from the police at Kilrush.
Clare Journal,Thur 20 Jun 1867:
Local and District News: John Miller, of this town, charged with Fenianism, and on the run since 5th March last, surrendered himself to F N Keane, Esq, J P, and was committed for futher examination.
Clare Journal, Mon 24 Jun 1867:
Investigation at the Jail. An investigation was held this morning in the county jail, before Thomas Greene, Esq, J P, into the case of Richard Shinners and John Miller, remanded from last week, charged with complicity in the Fenian rising at Drumcliffe, on the night of 5th March last. It will be remembered that Miller surrendered himself to the authorities a few days ago, and tat Shinners was arrested at his father’s house in Mill street, on Monday morning last.
Mr Morphy attended on the part of the Crown, and the prisoners were defended by Mr C B Molony and Mr M Molony.
Navin, the informer, was produced, and gave evidence against the prisoners. His statement differed slightly in detail from his former testimony, but the bench was of the opinion that these inaccuracies, in themselves not of sufficient importance to neutralize his former evidence, and it was decided to take the information and send the cases for trial at the ensuing assizes, along with those of the other Fenian prisoners. The investigation lasted about an hour.
Clare Journal, Mon 8 Jul 1867:
Clare Summer Assizes. The assizes for this county will be opened at the Court-house on Monday next, at five o’clock in the evening, before the Right Hon Justice Keogh, and the Right Hon Justice Fitzgerald, when the following criminal cases will be disposed of [six cases listed here]. The following are the names of the persons to be put on trial on the charge of Fenianism, and for unlawfully assembling in arms at Drumcliffe, on the night of the 5th March: John Nelson, Thomas Moran, John Maguire, John Burns, Richard Fitzgibbon, Robert Quinn, George Dixon, Stephen Slattery, Michael Cunningham, James Halloran, Thomas Walsh, Michael Hassett, James Crowe, Richard Wall, John Crowe, John Molony, Edward McInerney, Patrick McMahon, Patrick Hagarty, John Touhy, Michael Crohan, James Rochford, Thomas Hanrahan, Patrick Kelly, John McMahon, James McNamara, Patrick Moran, Stephen Hehir, Patrick Hickey, Corney Sullivan, John O’Neill, Charles O’Brien, Richard Meade, James Sullivan, Richard Shinners, John Miller – of whom 24 have been bailed; also, Thomas Fennell and Pat Fitzpatrick, for attacking the Coast Guard Station, at Kilbaha, and James Keane, for harbouring Fennell.
The Grand Jury will be sworn at twelve o’clock on Friday next, for the discharge of fiscal business.
Clare Journal, Thur 11 Jul 1867:
Local and District News. Surrender of an Escaped Fenian. It will be remembered that some time ago a man named Hogan was arrested on a charge of Fenianism at Cahir, but managed to make his escape from the police of that station while in their custody. Every search for the missing man proved unavailing, and the circumstances well nigh forgotten, when he surrendered himself to Francis M Westropp, Esq, J P, on Tuesday last, and committed to jail. He was immediately escorted into Ennis by the Tulla constabulary, and handed over to the prison authorities.


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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Wed Feb 24, 2021 11:31 am

Clare Journal, Thur 18 Jul 1867:
Assizes Intelligence. Crown Court – Tuesday. The Right Hon Judge Keogh took his seat on the bench at ten o’clock.
Thomas Fennell was placed at the bar on a charge of treason felony, for having on the night of the 5th March attacked the Coastguard station, at Kilbaha, near Carrigaholt.
The Solicitor-General, Sergeant Barry, Mr Exham, Q C, and Mr Latouche, appeared for the Crown; and Mr Fitzgibbon, for the defence. After several challenges, the following jury was then sworn – Robert Johnson, Michael Kerin J P, John B McNamara, Wm Butler, Randal W Borough, Robert Hewitt, Marcus Talbot, Michael Kenny, James Cullinan, Thomas Moran Augustin Greene, Edmond B Brown.
After the jury had been empanelled.
The Solicitor-General rose and said it may not be necessary for him to state that he was then in the discharge of his public duty to prosecute the Fenian prisoners. The Fenian conspiracy was a matter of notoriety. They all knew of the attempts which had been made at an insurrection on the nights of the 5th and 6th of March last. Attacks had been made on police barracks, coastguard stations, and on private dwellings in order that the insurgents might acquire strength to levy war against the Queen and to depose her from the sovereignty of Ireland and establish an Irish republic. Such an attempt was brought with danger to the lives of the people and the property of the country. An therefore it was that the Government was bound to afford the protection of the law in order to secure society from the perils which appeared to threaten it by bringing offenders to justice. They had issued Special Commissions for Dublin, Cork, and Limerick, and many unhappy persons were convicted, and in every case he had found the jurors discharge their duty with firmness and impartiality, convicting when no doubt existed, and in any case when a reasonable doubt existed, giving the prisoner the benefit of the doubt. It was not his intention to seek to obtain a verdict ‘per fas aut nefas, ‘ as might have been the case in days gone by, but merely to look for a conviction, when there was no doubt of guilt, and to allow the prisoner the benefit of every rational doubt. Treason-felony for which the prisoner was indicted consisted in the crime of attempting to depose her Majesty from the sovereignty of the country, and should be, as required by the law, shown by over or open acts, as the mere intention could only be demonstrated by open acts of violence, and other acts cognizable to the law. Demanding arms in the name of the Irish Republic constituted the offence, and if the prisoner had been found by evidence to have acted in such a manner he became amenable to the law. It would be necessary first to show the existence of the Fenian conspiracy, and what its objects were, which they could do by the evidence of Head-constable Talbot, who was a man of valour to whom the country owed much, and next they would be liable to show that the prisoner, as a member of that conspiracy, had been a party to one of the grossest outrages recorded in the annals of Fenian crime. The coastguard station at Kilbaha consisted of three houses occupied by the chief boatman Wilmot, Loyd and Stamford. On the first of these men an attack was made of a desperate nature, which he bravely resisted. It appeared that the five men, named Thomas Fennell, Stephen Fennell, Brennan, Fitzpatrick, and Deloughery were drinking at a public house near the coastguard station, three of whom, Thomas Fennell, Deloughery, and Fitzpatrick went to the station. Deloughery and Fitzpatrick first went to Loyd’s house and asked for Wilmott. Fitzpatrick remained there, but Deloughery and Fennell went to Wilmot’s at about six o’clock, and the former demanded arms in the name of the Irish Republic in which Wilmott refused saying he had none. He sent them to the watchhouse and when there he closed the door on them, and took his revolver and went out to call for aid. The men broke out of the watchhouse when Wilmott fired twice on them and attempted to arrest one of them. A scuffle ensued and it would be shown in evidence that Wilmott had been thrown to the ground and stabbed by Deloughery who has since effected his escape from the country, whilst the prisoner held him. Loyd at length came to Wilmott’s assistance and when he threatened to fire they decamped not until Deloughery had taken away Wilmott’s revolver with which he had twice fired back on the coastguards. Further details would appear in evidence.
Constable Thomas Talbot examined by Mr Exham, deposed that he was on special duty in the county Tipperary and became acquainted with the Fenian organization. Here the witness repeated the Fenian oath and stated that he had himself been appointed Head Centre for Munster; is a Protestant but became a Roman Catholic for five month; had never taken the Fenian oath; knew of the intended rising on the 1st March in about an hour after it had been decided on; the military leader of the organization was Colonel Kelly and the head man James Stephens.
Susan Hehir examined by Mr Latouche, deposed that she keeps a public house; there were parties drinking at her house on the night of the 5th March; there were other boys with the prisoner; Stephen Fennell, a man named Deloughery, Thomas Brennan, and Fitzpatrick live about a hundred yards from the coastguard station; it was after five o’clock when they left her house.
Cross-examined by Mr Fitzgibbon – Saw the prisoner sometimes at her house, drinking before that night; the party on the night of the 5th March were speaking to her about marriage; she wished Stephen Fennell and the other ‘sinougher’ a good wife, and the prisoner said he would shortly have a good one.
Owen Loyd examined by Sergeant Barry – Recollects 5th March; there are three coastguards’ houses at the station; his house was the middle one; there were seven men coming down the road, and two of them came to the station; one of them, named Deloughery came into my house, and my wife asked him to sit down, but he said that he wanted to see Mr Wilmott; Deloughery went away, and the other man stopped with him, and in a few minutes Wilmott called out and said we were attacked; I armed myself with my rifle and revolver, and called out to Stamford; when I came out I ran between turf ricks, and in getting over a wall, I fell, but got up, and Brennan, the pilot, assisted me to put on my belt; I then saw three men on the ground; they immediately got up, and I saw Deloughery stabbing Wilmott twice whilst the prisoner held him; I came up and swore that I would blow his brains out unless he let Wilmott go; they then ran away but before they went Deloughery snapped the revolver from Wilmott.
Cross-examined by Mr Fitzgibbon – My father was a Welshman, and I am about ten years in the coastguard service; I was dismissed from the coastguard service in April last; there was an investigation at Kilcredane about the matter by the coastguard authorities and I was dismissed and transferred to the navy; I was on duty at the house where Fennell lay wounded; I was placed there to prevent his escape; I never said that I could not identify the prisoner, Thomas Fennell.
John Wilmott, commission boatman, to the solicitor general – I remember about six o’clock on the evening of the 5th March; two men came into the kitchen, and a third man come shortly after; Fennell, the prisoner, and Deloughery were there; my wife was present; she asked them to sit, and they said they would shortly have time enough to sit down; I said that was curious language to use in my house; they asked me was I a Roman Catholic; I said yes, and they asked me to shake hands but I refused; then Deloughery said that they came to attack the station, and to take it in the name of the Irish Republic; they then rushed through my bedroom into the guardroom to take the arms; I seized my revolver and closed the door on them, and called out to the other coastguards to run out, that the station was attacked; Fennell, Deloughery, and the other man broke out of the guard room through the window; I fired twice at them, but missed fire on the third shot; I then went up to arrest them; I saw Fennell wounded; whilst arresting them they knocked me down, and the prisoner held me whilst Deloughery stabbed me in three parts of the body – the arm, the side, and the stomach; Loyd came up and I asked him why he did not fire; Loyd then said that he would knock out Fennell’s brains with the butt end of his musket if he did not let me go; they then let me go and ran away, having first wrested my revolver from me; they fired some shots after going away.
Cross-examined by Mr Fitzgibbon – I have a wife and five children and am now at Tarbert. Nothing material was elicited in the cross-examination.
Mrs Wilmot deposed that three men came to the house in the evening of the 5th, and they demanded arms which her husband refused to give. The witness corroborated her husband's testimony in all essential particulars.
Dr Thomas O’Donnell examined by the Solicitor General, deposed that he had attended Wilmot on the 25th March and described the nature of the wounds as they appreared to him after twenty–one days expiration. He also deposed to having seen the prisoner’s wound which he believed to be a gunshot wound.
This gentleman’s evidence was that of Dr Keogh, of Carrigaholt, who had professionally attended Wilmot and also had seen the prisoner’s wound was most satisfactory and clear.
Pat Keane, a countryman, deposed to two men on the night of the 5th of March having taken prisoner of his horse and car and going away with it for a short distance. The prisoner was not one of them.
A member of the coastguard body from the county Cork, named James Taylor, whose station had been attacked on the night of the 5th in the name of the Irish Republic, was produced and deposed to the fact in order to show the nature of the Fenian conspiracy.
Constable Brennan, of Ballyknockane station, county Cork, and Constable Adams, of the Kilmallock police barrack, were also examined to prove the character and object of the Fenian attacks on the night of the 5th of March.
The case for the crown then closed and Mr Fitzgibbon addressed the jury at considerable length and with much ability on behalf of the prisoner, after which Stephen Brennan was examined for the defence. He deposed that he saw Wilmot firing a shot, and that a man was running away who was not the prisoner whom he had seen there on the occasion.
Dr Keogh on being re-examined deposed that Wilmot described the man who fired as a tall man. He had attended Wilmot a few hours after he had been wounded when this conversation occurred, and he did not, in his opinion, appear to know who had held him until he had been wounded. He appeared to be confused from loss of blood.
Sergeant Barry then addressed the jury at some length, and during his address dwelt on the folly of a few foolish persons in a remote district attempting to overturn the British Government and establish an Irish republic in its stead.
His lordship then addressed the jury in a clear and comprehensive manner, who, after about twenty minutes absence, returned a verdict of guilty.
Clare Journal, Thur 18 Jul 1867:
Discharge of the Fenian Prisoners. In accordance with the general expectation the whole of the prisoners, except the two unfortunate soldiers, arrested and charged with complicity in the Fenian rising in this neighbourhood in March last, have been discharged on bail to appear for trial at the ensuing assizes. Whether this course has been adopted in consequence of the difficulty in procuring evidence in corroboration of the informer’s testimony, or whether it be possible ever to procure such evidence, as a reason why such a course should have been pursued, we are not, of course, in a position t say. It is a secret known only to the Attorney General and the officials of the crown; but whatever may be the reason, we hope that the very narrow escape – for it is a narrow escape – which these young enthusiasts have had, will serve as a caution to them for the future. The Crown has not been disposed to push matter to extremities, it is not politic to do so, but throughout the whole of this unfortunate business, it will be remembered to its honor that justice has not been unmixed with a very large proportion of mercy. For these young fellows, who had no grievances to complain of, even they, influenced as they may have been, by this dangerous Fenian fiasco, may profit by the experience of its complete and miserable collapse.
Clare Journal, Thur 18 Jul 1867:
Crown Court – Yesterday. The Right Hon Judge Keogh entered Court at 10 o’clock, and in the course of the day the Right Hon Lord Dunboyne occupied a seat on the bench with his lordship.
Thomas Fennell, who had been found guilty on the previous day of treason-felony, as being one of the two men who had attacked the coastguard station at Kilbaha, was put forward and sentenced to ten years’ penal servitude.
Patrick Fitzpatrick, who is only about sixteen years old, and who pleaded guilty to having gone to the coastguard station on the night of the 5th of March, but who had not taken a part in the attack, was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment, with hard labour.
The Ennis Fenian Prisoners. Mr O’Loghlen addressed his lordship and said that he was concerned for the parties charged with appearing in arms on the night of the 5th of March at Drumcliffe. They were ready for their trial but it appeared that the crown were not ready until next assizes to proceed, he would therefore request that the parties be allowed out on their own recognizance.
Mr Fitzgibbon who appreared with Mr O’Loghlen in the case addressed the court in support of the application.
The Solicitor-General said that those of the accused who were out on bail would of course be allowed to stand out on the same recognizance, and those who were not admitted to bail, up to the present, would be allowed out on finding two sureties of £40 each to stand their trial at the next assizes, but with respect to John Burns, John Maguire and the two soldiers of the 9th and 74th, Quin and Meade, he should oppose any application for bail. The learned gentleman read and affidavit made by Mr Curling, Sub-inspector of police, to the effect that a material witness, Joseph Grady, could not be found, and, that he had reason to believe, he had been induced to leave the country in order to avoid giving evidence.
His Lordship said that after such a document had been read in court, he could not admit these four prisoners to bail.
The prisoners were then removed, and with these exceptions all the other prisoners were allowed to on bail.
Sheila
Last edited by Sduddy on Wed Feb 24, 2021 1:21 pm, edited 7 times in total.

Sduddy
Posts: 1148
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Wed Feb 24, 2021 12:05 pm

Clare Journal, Thur 15 Aug 1867:
Admission of a Fenian Prisoner to Bail. On Saturday, Thomas Greene, Esq, J P, attended at the county jail, Ennis, in compliance with an order from his Excellency the Lord Lieutenant, to accept bail on behalf of Cornelius Hassett, who had been arrested last March, under a Habeas Corpus suspension warrant, for alleged conspiracy with the Fenian movement. Having duly enterered into recognizances, himself in £100, with two surities of £50 each, the party was released from custody.
Clare Journal, Mon 9 Sep 1867:
Ennis Petty Sessions: Five lads named Patrick Crowe, Michael O’Neill, Patrick Daffy, Patrick Long, and James Guanane, between the ages of ten and fifteen, were charged by Sub-constable O’Shea with singing a seditious song in the public streets, on the previous Sunday night.
Mr C B Molony appeared for the defendants.
The Sub-constable said that on the night in question, between the hours of nine and ten he was on duty on the Mall when his attention was attracted by a number of boys who were making a great noise. He first heard some of them talking about ‘Shooting Stacpoole’s deer.’ He then drew off a little, and they immediately commenced singing ‘Glory, glory to the Fenian boys, as they go marching on.’ When he heard this he went to them.
Mr Keane – That is a seditious song, is it not?
The Sub-constable – It is sir.
In cross-examination by Mr Molony, the witness said that he was not more than thirty or forty yards from the boys at the time. There were no other boys there at the time but the five defendants. He would swear upon his oath that it was not an American song they were singing. He could not say that he heard them singing ‘Johnny I hardly knew you’ (roars of laughter). Did not hear them sing ‘John Brown’ either – in fact he heard nothing but what he stated. Did not hear them singing ‘Molly I’ll die if you leave me’ (renewed laughter). Was in coloured clothers at the time. The defendants were just outside James Ryan’s door at the time.
Mr Molony (to the bench) – There is nothing that you can adjudicate upon here.
Sub-constable Finnerty was next called and confirmed the evidence of the previous witness. He said they were both out on duty together.
Mr Molony repeated that the magistrates had no jurisdiction to deal summarily with the case, and he did not suppose for a moment that the bench would send forward children like these. It was moreover a question what was a seditious song, and whether the ditty those lads were singing could be placed in that category.
Dr Cullinan thought they had sufficient evidence before them to hold the defendants in their good behaviour for twelve months.
Mr Keane said that even young children should be taught that they were not to sing disloyal songs.
The Bench, however, after some discussion, discharged the defendants with a caution, as their fathers submitted, and promised they would be of good behavious for the future.
Clare Journal, Mon 16 Sep 1867:
Local and District News. Discharge of Prisoners. On Friday, Daniel Connors, James Molony, John Buckley and John McMahon, who were confined in the County Gaol charged with illegal drilling at Doonass, in July last, were admitted to bail for trial at next assizes, by Edmond Blake, Esq, R M, who attended at the gaol for that purpose.
Clare Journal, Mon 14 Oct 1867:
Removal of Fenian Prisoners from the Ennis County Jail. On Friday moring John Byrne, John Maguire and Patrick Hogan, charged with complicity in the Fenian movement, were removed from our county jail to Mountjoy prison, in charge of Head-constable Mills, Constables Alexaner, Molloy, Dillon, Lorinane and O’Shea. The last named prisoner had been for some time in the constabulary, and was one of the persons arrested under the habeas corpus suspension warrant about two years ago at Feacle, when he succeeded in effecting his escape from Cahir Station. He eluded every effort of the police to recapture him until within the last few month, wen he voluntarily surrendered himself to Francis M. Westropp, Esq, in the hope of experiencing the clemency of the executive. The prisoners took their departure by the eight o’clock, a.m., train, and so close was the secrecy observed that not even their immediate friends were apprised of it. It is conjectured that Private Robert Quin, 74th Regiment, and Private Richard Meade, 9th Regiment, now the only prisoners in Ennis jail on a charge of complicity with the Fenian movement, will be immediately transmitted to their respective regiments.
Clare Journal, Thur 24 Oct 1867:
Committals to Ennis Gaol. On Tuesday last a man named Robert Molony was arrested in Corofin, for using treasonable language. He was taken before a magistrate, who committed him to Ennis Gaol, until the 6th inst., when he will be brought before the magistrates at petty sessions ofr examinaion.
Clare Journal, Thur 7 Nov 1867:
Arrest under the Habeas Corpus Act. On Sunday a man named Patrick Morris was arrested by Sub-constable Aylward, at Ennistymon, on suspicion of being connected with Fenianism. The prisoner was accompanied by a woman, whom he alleged to be his wife. It seems he had been in England for the last twenty-five years, although an Irishman by birth, and had been residing latterly at York. He is at present confined in the bridewell pending further inquiries. The man belongs to the labouring class.
Clare Journal, Thur 6 Feb 1868:
Removal of a Fenian Prisoner. Matthew McMahon, who was some short time since arrested under the Lord Lieutenant’s warrant and committed to Ennis jail was removed on yesterday to Mount Joy prison. A detachment of the Ennis constabulary escorted the prisoner to the railway station where he was given in charge to Constable Alexander.
Clare Journal, Mon 10 Feb 1868:
Admitted to Bail. Bail was effected this (Thursday) morinng by John Carroll, who was committed at the last sessions to Ennis Jail for singing seditious songs, for his good behaviour for twelve months.
Clare Journal, Mon 9 Mar 1868:
Cornelius Sullivan, one of the persons charged with being implicated in the rising at Drumcliff on the night of 5th of March last, since which time the defendant had succeeded in eluding the police, surrendered himself to Mr. Greene.
Mr M. Molony appeared on behalf of the defendant, and the bench bound him over to appear at the next petty sessions, in the mean time to give the magistrates an opportunity of communicating with the prosecutor, Mr. Morphy.


Clare Journal, Mon 16 Mar 1868:
The Drumcliffe “Fiasco.” John Maguire, one of the persons arrested for complicity in the Drumcliffe “rising" in March last, has been discharged from Mountjoy prison, by order of his Excellency, on condition that he left the country, and he has since proceed to America.
Clare Journal, Thur 19 Mar 1868:
Stephen J. Meany. The health of Mr Stephen J. Meany, who was sentenced to fifteen years’ penal servitude, seem to have been failing him, for he has been removed from Pentonville to a sanitary station in Surrey. Mrs Meany has received a letter from the Home Office, informing her that her husband will be sent out of the country on condition that he promises never again to return to it.
Clare Journal, Thur 26 Mar 1868:
Among the passengers who embarked at Queenstown on Saturday, on board the national steamer, Helvetia, was John Burns, of this town, who had been liberated from Mountjoy Prison. He was arrested in Queenstown on 7th of March, 1867, as he was about to proceed to America, on the charge of complicity in the Fenian outbreak, which had then begun. There being no evidence to connect him with the serious offence for which he was apprehended, a warrant came down for his detention under the Habeas Corpus Act. He spent twelve months in confinement in Mountjoy, and was ultimately liberated on the usual conditions.
Clare Journal, Mon 6 Apr 1868:
There have been fresh departures of Fenians of some note from Queenstown. Michael O’Brien, who was arrested in Ballinasloe in February, 1866, in the costume of a priest, and has since lain in Mountjoy Prison, has left Ireland on condition not to return. Colonel Mockler, a member of the New York volunteers, is also among the emigrants.
Clare Journal, Mon 27 Apr 1868:
The Drumcliffe Transaction. Cornelius Sullivan, who surrendered himself some weeks ago upon a charge of complicity in the Fenian rising at Drumcliffe, in March 1867, appeared before the court, and entered into recognizances to the amount of £50, to appear when called upon. He was then discharged.
Clare Journal, Mon 11 May 1868:
Illegal Drilling Last Night. Arrests by the Police. About twelve o’clock last night (Sunday), as Acting Constable Birmingham and two Sub-constabless were on patrol opposite McMahon’s public house, in Drumbiggle, one of the Sub-constables called attention to a noise as if a number of men were walking in marching order down the Drumbiggle road. The police paused, and in a few minutes heard the words of command uttered in a loud voice. They then proceeded up the road thinking that the darkness of the night would enable them to close upon the parties so as to ascertain what they were doing. They had not proceeded far when they observed a party of men advancing in marching order, with one man in front who, as the Acting Constable states, appeared to be the leader, and another, who marched by the side of the column, the commander of the party. They were headed by a fiddler who was playing a march to which they kept step. The police waited until they came within a few yards of them when they advanced into the middle of the road; the Acting Constable at once seized the leader, and sub-constable Heggart another of the party; the other policeman endeavoured to seize the fiddler, but was unsuccessful. The rest of the party decamped like so many frightened hares, leaving the two prisoners in charge of the police. They were at once conveyed to the barrack, and head constable Mills and a detachment of the police proceeded to the place and scoured the locality but did not succeed in making any further arrests. The prisoners, whose names are Patrick Hogan and Michael Flynn, both painters in the employ of Mr Shannihan, were brought up before Mr Blake, R.M., this morning, who remanded them until Friday next bail being accepted for their appearance. Flynn is a stranger in Ennis having only arrived about ten days since from Dublin.
Clare Journal, Mon 25 May 1868:
Ennis Petty Session. Michael Flynn and Patrick Hogan (on bail), surrendered for further examination with reference to the charge of Illegal drilling, at Drumbiggle, on the night of Sunday week.
Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Fri Feb 26, 2021 2:00 pm

Clare Journal, Mon 12 Oct 1868:
Release of the Fenian Prisoners. A meeting, convened by requisition, was held in the Town-hall this morning “to petition her Most Gracious Majesty, for the release of the political prisoners, in accordance with the resolution adopted by the other corporate bodies throughout Ireland.” The requisition was signed by the following gentlemen: John G O’Dwyer, James Costello, Richard Pearson, John Meehan, and Thomas Meehan.
Mr Talbot, who presided, delivered an appropriate and able speech, and Mr Michael Molony, after a few supplementary observations, concluded by moving the following resolution, which was seconded by Mr Costello, and carried unanimously: “That a memorial from this board be forwarded by the Chairman to the Home Secretary, praying for the release of the political prisoners at present suffering imprisonment for their connection with the Fenian movement.”
A letter was read from Mr John H Leech, tendering his resignation as a member of the board on the ground that he regarded “the movement that had been set on foot by a party in the town as a menace to those who seek re-election.” The letter also proceeded to say that “he must decline to have his public conduct influenced by pressure from any extreme party.”
A full report will appear in our next.
Clare Journal, Mon 16 Nov 1868:
Local and District News. Fenian Placards. On this morning, the police on duty discovered placards posted at different quarters of the town, reminding that this day was the anniversary of the execution of the Manchester Fenians, Allen, Larkin, and Gould, and requesting them to pray for them. The police, of course, at once tore them down.
Clare Journal,Thur 18 Mar 1869:
Local and District News. The Mail of yesterday says it is understood that Stephen J Meany, one of the political prisoners who was liberated about a year ago, returned to Dublin yesterday morning by a North-wall steamer. Mr Meany arrived in Ennis on a visit to his friends on the same evening (Tuesday).
Clare Journal, Mon 22 Mar 1869:
The Fenian Convicts. Enthusiastic Ovation to Mr Stephen J. Meany in Ennis Yesterday. Speeches of the Very Rev. Dean Kenny, Mr. Meany and Others. - Presentaton of an Address.
Yesterday Mr Stephen J. Meany, the released Fenian convict, was the recipient of an ovation from his fellow townsmen which must have been most gratifying to that gentleman. Mr Meany has been in Ennis for several days, and during that time met with warm and personal congratulations from troops of friends; the idea of a general demonstration was distasteful to him on many grounds, the principal being that if it were given a political aspect, it would seriously affect the chances of his compatriots still in durance. Yielding, however, to the repeated solicitations of the Congregated Trades and others of his friends, he yesterday consented to accept an address of congratulations on his return to his native town, and the occasion was, as we have suggested, made the most of. The Old Chapel – the scene of O’Connell’s labours – was selected as the most fitting place, and the walls of the spacious building were decorated with the splendid banners of the Congregated Trades. The meeting did not have a Fenian aspect. The place was crowded to its utmost capacity; and Protestant and Catholic – Fenian and anti-Fenian - stood side by side to give welcome to a townsman. The Trades mustered in large numbers, and several Town Commissioners were present to participate in the proceedings. On the whole, everything seemed conducted with taste and decorum. The entrance of the Very Rev. Dean Kenny, accompanied by Rev. Matt Kenny, was hailed wit great enthusiasm; but the approach of the object of the day’s ovation, conducted by a deputation from the meeting, was met by a storm of cheers seldom approached in length and strength.
At half-past two o’clock, on the motion of Mr Michael Considine, seconded by Mr Michael Barrett, the chair was taken amidst prolonged cheers by the Very Rev. Dean Kenny, P.P., of Ennis. The Rev. Chairman in opening the proceedings said - My friends, In yielding to your request to preside at this meeting – and I need not say to you that I yielded gladly – I had two objects in view, one to meet as far as circumstances permitted the wishes of the people of Ennis so unanimously expressed, and the next to assist in paying a just tribute to one who has nobly earned it – your townsman and my old and esteemed friend Stephen Joseph Meany. (Cheers) [The speech continues here] …And here I would not be misunderstood. I am not here to discuss the propriety or impropriety – the justice or injustice – of the matters involved in the movement in which it is said Mr Meany was prominently connected [the speech continues here]
Mr Michael Considine, Secretary of the Congregated Trades, was then called upon, by the rev. chairman, to proceed with the business of the meeting. In a speech of much fervour and eloquence Mr Considine referred to the object of which they had assembled; and, after some observations, highly complimentary to Mr Meany, read to that genleman the following address: - The Address of Congratulation, presented by the Congregated Trades and Working Classes of Ennis to Mr. Stephen Joseph Meany, upon his Return to his Native Town, after his Release from and English Dungeon. “Sir, - We, the trades and working men of Ennis, come forward to offer for your acceptance, our deep and heartfelt congratulations on your return to old Ireland [the address follows here]… Whilst we deeply regret your departure so soon from amongst us we hope you will carry back to the land of your adoption those sentiments of love and respect for you as a patriot of tried fidelity to the cause of Ireland. Convey them to your fellow countrymen who enjoy the sacred blessings of freedom under the Star Spangled Banner of America; and be assured that your name and actions in connection with Ireland’s independence shall ever remain deeply engraved in our hearts. Signed on behalf of the Trades – Michael Considine, secretary; Patrick R. Molony, Patrick Hassett, Stephen Clancy, Thomas Moran, Thomas Crowe, Michael Considine, Bryan Daly, John Guerin, Thomas Fahy, Thomas Scully. Ennis March 21st 1869.”
Mr Considine then presented the address to Mr Meany … Mr Meany, who appeared deeply affected by the warmth of the demonstration in his regard, proceeded to reply [a long speech here occupies a full column of the newspaper, and ends with a verse by Gerald Massey]….
"Never give up! 'tis the secret of glory,
Nothing more wise can philosophy preach;
Think of the men who are famous in story,
Never give up! is the lesson they teach.

"How have they compassed immortal achievements?
How have they moulded the world to their will?
'Tis that thro' dangers, and woes, and bereavements,
Never give up! was their principle still."

Mr Meany concluded his address of which we give but a brief outline, amidst loud and prolonged cheering.
The Very Rev Dean Kenny then vacated the chair, when the Rev M Kenny was called thereto, and a vote of thanks was passed by acclamation to the prior chairman.
The Rev M Kenny then made a lengthened speech, in which he gave utterance to sentiments of an advanced “national” character. The right of free and open political discussion he not only recognized but contended for; while secret organizations and consequuence he unhesitatingly condemned…..After a few parting words of advice from Dean Kenny, the meeting separated cheering loudly and continuously for Mr Meany, the political prisoners generally, and Old Ireland.
Clare Journal, Mon 29 Mar 1869:
The Case of Stephen J. Meany. It is already known that a year ago Mr Meany, who was convicted of Treason Felony and sentenced to 15 years of penal servitude, was, after an incarceration of eighteen months, released at the instance of the American Government, but on “condition of leaving the United Kingdom and not returning thereto.” Mr Meany, however, having received the appointment of Special Correspondent of the New York World, in Great Britain and Ireland sought, through the interposition of the United States’ Minister at London, to have the condition removed in order to the free and undisturbed performance of his duties. He arrived in Parish in furtherance of this object in the first week of December last, and after a correspondence, extending over fourteen weeks, between the Foreign and Home Offices in London, and between the Irish Office and the United States Legation, Mr Meany was on Saturday officially apprised of the successful issue of his efforts. We are informed, however, that he was a fortnight previously “unofficially” made aware of the result – a fact which accounts for his appearance in Ennis. The following are the official letters:
[addressed to Stephen J. Meany, No 9, Rue Castislione, Paris.]
Legation of the United States of America, 4, Upper Portland Place, London, March 20th, 1869, 9 p.m.
Dear Sir, - I am glad to tell you that Lord Clarendon has just officially informed me that the condition annexed to your pardon has been removed. You are at liberty therefore to be in any part of Great Britain.
To have assisted in this result has been a matter of pleasure as well as duty. – I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Reverdy Johnson.

[addressed to Mr Stephen J Meany, Care of the Very Rev Dean Kenny, P.P., Ennis.]
Consulate of the U.S. of America, Dublin, 25th March, 1869.
Sir, - I beg to acquaint you that I have received a dispatch from Mr Johnstoen, Minister at London, dated the 20th instant, informing me that the condition annexed to your pardon has been removed by the British Government, and which he requests me to communicate to you. – I am, sir, your obedient servant, William B. West, Consul.
Clare Journal, Mon 29 Mar 1869:
Local and District News: Entertainment to Mr. Meany. At a meeting of the Town Commissioners today, it was resolved to grant the use of the Town-hall to enable the Trades of the town to give a suitable entertainment to Mr Stephen J. Meany. The accommodation was granted free of charge.
Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Sat Feb 27, 2021 2:33 pm

Clare Journal, Mon 5 Apr 1869:
The Political Prisoners. Reception of Mr Stephen J. Meany at Corofin. Improvised Demonstrations.
Yesterday Mr Stephen J. Meany, accompanied by several friends from Ennis, visited the far-famed Lake of Inchiquin – a scene and locality to which Mr. M. devoted some of the earliest, and perhaps not the worst, of his poetic efforts. The route to the place of visitation embraced the thriving village of Corofin, and although the visit was unannounced and unexpected, a demonstration was improvised by the “nationalists” of the neighbourhood. The Catholic clergymen – professional gentlemen – the merchants and traders of Corofin, &c., laid, so to speak, embargo on the released Prisoner, and a demonstration, as we have suggested, was made in his regard, which was as enthusiastic as those in Ennis. An old friend and school-fellow – and a prominent merchant in the town – entertained Mr M. and his companions at a splendid banquet: after which a deputation waited on him with a request to be permitted to present him with a welcoming and congratulatory address. Mr Meany assented with the understanding that the address was to come from old friends and associates, and not from any political organization.
The following address was soon afterwards presented by a deputation from the inhabitants, and amidst great enthusiasm: -
An Address of the Inhabitants of Corofin, County Clare, to Stephen Joseph Meany, on His Accidental Appearance Among Them.
“Sir, - We the Patriotic inhabitants of Corofin, avail ourselves of this opportunity of your accidental appearance amongst us, to tender you our heartfelt congratulations on your release from a British bastile [a long speech here refers, at one point, to his time spent in Corofin in his early years: “Though our little town cannot claim the honour of your birth – and though we call all Irishmen who suffer in the good cause our brothers – yet we look upon you as intimately connected with us. You were so in early boyhood and in growing manhood; and often have you, when joining in the social amusements of the village, shown manifestations of that growing talent and patriotism which is the leading star of your eventful life ever since.”]
…Signed on behalf of the patriotic inhabitants of Corofin: Committee: John Morony, John Hurley, James Henstrick, Andrew J. Haire, Michael Keane, Robert O’Donnell, John Eagan.
Mr Meany responded with his accustomed eloquence. He said that he accepted the honour paid him simply as one offered by his fellow Clare men – many of whom were his friends, schoolmates and play fellows – and not as a political pronouncement made in regard to one who had been forced into prominence in politics [his speech continues here].
Several other speeches were made; but these did not in any degree touch upon political or Fenian topics. They were merely of a complimentary and congratulatory character.
Sheila

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