Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

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Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Thu Sep 13, 2018 10:54 am

Hi Jim
That’s some headstone alright. Yes, that Patrick is probably the one who was naturalized in 1866.

As our Patrick died at aged 41 in 1882, it’s likely that his brother was still alive in 1901. There are surprisingly few Tierneys in Ennis in 1901 (only 23), but we must bear in mind that Patrick’s brother might also have joined the British army, which gave employment to a lot of people, especially those who lived in urban areas, and was a traditional form of employment in some families – almost like a trade handed down from father to son, so it’s quite possible that Patrick’s brother was not living in Ennis in 1901.
If Patrick’s brother was still alive in 1901, he would be aged 50 – 70, but there’s no Tierney (with a name other than Patrick) aged over 40, so I looked at the deaths registered in Ennis between 1875 and 1901, but found no one who could possibly be a brother of Patrick.There are two, though, who could possibly be the father of Patrick: (1) Thomas Tierney, a married man, from Lysaghts Lane who died in 1878, aged 75; informant Bridget Tierney, Lysaght’s Lane (probably his wife). That Bridget may be the Bridget Tierney, widow, who died in 1896, aged 84, but she died in the workhouse, so again there’s no clue as to any relative.
(2) John Tierney, widower, from Borheen, who died 1892 aged 76, but he died in the workhouse so the informant is not a family member.

I think I will have to get the record for the Mary Tierney who died in 1872. Chances are, of course, that Mary is not the mother of Patrick, and maybe not even from the town of Ennis, or even from the hinterland - Ennis registration district covers a large area of the county.

Sheila

Sduddy
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Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Fri Sep 14, 2018 10:55 am

I read the story of Patrick Keating in The Shanachie: http://feniangraves.net/Tierney,%20Patr ... 2013-4.pdf, and noted that the article had been contributed by Ellen Bohan whose sources were several American newspaper reports. There must be other records on this side of the Atlantic – maybe among the Fenian papers held in Kew: (1) the publication of Tierney’s situation; (2) the appointment of a commission comprising of two members of parliament, Spencer Talbot and Henry Holland; (3) the pardon granted on Nov. 18, 1878.
For the task of finding names of relatives, the most useful of these must be the initial publication of Patrick's case. I checked the British Newspapers Archives site: http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/, and found a thumbnail of an article in the Freeman’s Journal, of 05 December 1878, under the title “The Political Prisoners”: “…and paper having been supplied, the following is a copy of the statement. Written on board the City of Chester, by Patrick Tierney, described by the British warrant as 25 years, born in Ennis, Clare, and convicted in June, ’06, for the contemplated…”
https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co. ... nal&page=0

I doubt that this article, which seems to rely on an account written by Patrick when he was on his way to America, will give any more on his family than we know already from the interviews he gave on his arrival, but I can’t find any other reference to Patrick Tierney’s case - at least not in the Freeman's Journal.

Sheila

Jimbo
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Jimbo » Sat Sep 15, 2018 6:33 am

In May of 1864 a 27 year old Patrick Tierney was bound for New York, a place many an Irishmen knew right well. Patrick's leaving of Liverpool was on a Yankee clipper ship, Davey Crockett was her name, and Burgess was the captain of her, and they say that she was a floating hell.

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903 ... print=true

On the ship register, Patrick Tierney is traveling with two others, most likely siblings: John Tierney (age 16) and Katherine Tierney (age 18).
Attachments
28 May 1864 NY arrival of Ship David Crockett with Patrick Tierney.jpg
28 May 1864 NY arrival of Ship David Crockett with Patrick Tierney.jpg (322.96 KiB) Viewed 2396 times

Sduddy
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Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Sat Sep 15, 2018 6:40 pm

Hi Jim

I know that song, but never knew that there was really such a ship as the Davy Crockett and that Burgess, the captain of her, was a real person.

Sheila

Sduddy
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Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Sat Sep 29, 2018 11:59 am

Well, I got the civil record of the death of Mary Tierney in 1872. She’s from Clonmoney in the civil parish of Bunratty – and not from Ennis. Plus she is described as unmarried. The staff in Sandfield House went through each registration district within the Union of Ennis, and finally found the death in the book for Newmarket registration district: May 23rd, 1872, at Clonmoney, Mary Tierney, Spinster, aged 65, Labourer; informant: Thomas Gleeson, present at death, Clonmoney.
The baptisms for the Catholic parish of Newmarket shows 6 children born to Pat Tierny and Mary Slevin of Newmarket: Michael b. 1831, Thomas b. 1833, Margaret b. 1837, Pat b. 1839, Anne b. 1841, Catherine b. 1845. The marriages show that a Bridget Tierney married Michael Brien in 1861. The first three of their children are in the Newmarket baptisms: Cornelius O’Brien b. 1861, Martin b. 1863, Patrick b. 1866 (The Newmarket registers, which have survived, go up to 1865, only).
The parish baptisms also show a Mary Tierney baptised in 1840, daughter of Michael Fleming and Mary Tierney.

I can find nothing to show that Patrick Tierney, who died in New Haven in 1878, was related in any way to the Mary Tierney, whose death was registered in Newmarket, Ennis Union, in 1872. So Patrick’s mother was a different Tierney, whose first name we do not know and whose death may not have been registered.
I am reading Eva O Cathaoir’s book, Soldiers of Liberty: A Study of Fenianism 1858-1808, and I’m pleased that it was recommended to me. She includes an appendix, which gives a short bio for 1000 of the men who were in the movement (pp 335-433), of whom 51 are from Co. Clare. This number includes some men who joined the movement late in the 19th century and also some men who were arrested under suspicion of being members, or abetting members, and were soon released. There’s quite of few of the men who gathered at Drumcliff in 1867 and also various others, including Patrick Tierney, whose biographical note gives all the information supplied by Ellen Bohan to the Shenachai magazine, but nothing more. O Cathaoir probably met with the same difficulties that I‘ve met with.

Sheila

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