Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

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deirdre carroll
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by deirdre carroll » Wed Mar 03, 2021 3:20 pm

Hello Sheila,

There was a Tierney family in Crusheen over a long period. See Thomas Coffey's book, pages 26, 36, 39. There were a number of movements associated with Crusheen in the 19th century and I am pretty sure I have come across the name Tierney. Probably worth checking,

Deirdre Carroll

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Sat Mar 06, 2021 11:55 am

Hi Deirdre,
thank you for that suggestion, but there were so many Tearney, Teerny, Tierny, Tierney families all over Clare (see Tithes: https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/cocla ... _index.htm. And Griffith’s: https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/cocla ... ffitht.htm ), I think it would be impossible now to decide which one Patrick Tierney belonged to.
Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Sat Mar 06, 2021 11:57 am

Clare Journal, Mon 25 Apr 1870:
Cork Quarter Sessions, - Thursday. Charge of Having Arms.
John Walsh, who pleaded guilty at the present sessions to the charge of having in his possession a revolver at Qeenstown, was again put forward.
Charles Gilfoil Doran, superintendent of works at Queenstown, was produced to give evidence as to the prisoner’s character.
The witness stated that he knew the prisoner for the last eleven years and that he had been in his employment for the greater portion of that time. Witness had frequent opportuntities of judging his character, and considered him a quiet, inoffensive and well conducted young man, and had no reason to hold any other opinion of him.
Cross examined by Mr P O’Connell – He was not under your superintendence in ’67? Not during that time but I have a knowledge of where he was. Were you in Ennis? No, I was in Tralee at the time; I don’t mean to say he was under my superintendence for the last six years, but he has been for about six years out of eleven. Are you aware that the prisoner was in Ennis ? No. Are you under Mr Made? No; I am over him. Did you know that he was contractor at Ennis for the asylum and that the prisoner and his father were employed there? I heard that the prisoner’s father was foreman. Where were you in ’67? I was in Kerry and Dublin. How soon after that was it that the prisoner came under your observation? In about two years after that time. Are you aware of where he was? He was in Dublin for a portion of the time, at least I heard so. Where did you first see him after ’67? In Queenstown. Have you all Dublin men at Queenstown? I have no reason to know where they are from as it Mr Made has them employed. Is Mr Made here? I cannot say.
To the Chairman – The prisoner’s father is employed by Mr Made as a general foreman.
Mr O’Connell – Is Mr Made in Queenstown at present?
One of his sons is acting for him.
How long before ’67 was it that the prisoner was under your observation? – I think somewhere about ’64 or ’65.
And from that time until ’69 when the works commenced at Queenstown, you had no knowledge of him?
I cannot say that I met him.
The Chairman, addressing Mr Joyce, said that the prisoner should be brought up again on the following morning, as Mr O’Connell had not got an answer to some inquiries regarding the prisoner.
He was accordingly put back, and will be again brought forward at ten o’clock this morning.
_______________
At the sitting of the Quarter Sessions Court on Friday morning, before Mr D R Kane, Q C, Chairman.
John Walsh, mason, was put forward, to receive sentence under a conviction for having had a loaded revolver in his possession in a proclaimed district.
Mr P O’Connell, on the part of the Crown, produced documents showing that a warrant had been issued for the arrest of the prisoner, on the following charges: - Having with fourteen others (named and described in the same documents) on the 5th March 1867, at Drumcliff and Kilbaha, Co Clare, appeared in arms and attacking houses for arms; also for, on the same day, attacking the coastguard station at Kilbaha, wounding one coastguard and depriving him of his revolver; and further, for pressing others to join in those unlawful proceedings.
The Chairman, in passing sentence, said that the character of the prisoner’s father was irreproachable. The sentence he was to pass, after due reflection, would, he hoped make the prisoner mend his ways. He strongly disapproved of the difference he had met with the police, and the efforts he made at that time; but he thought these circumstances might account for his having had the revolver in his possession. On a review of the whole case, he felt that he could not in justice to the country, and having due regard to the character of the present times and the provisions of the recent Act of Parliament pass upon him a less sentence than nine months imprisonment, with hard labour.
The prisoner (leaving the dock) – There will be an exchange of prisoners before that time.
When being removed in a car to the County Gaol, he exclaimed “God save Ireland.”
Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Thu Mar 18, 2021 3:23 pm

Clare Journal, Mon 13 May 1872:
Death of an Ex-Fenian Prisoner. This (Monday) afternoon John Maguire, who, it will be remembered, was arrested and imprisoned in Ennis in ’67, and subsequently confined in Mountjoy, died at his uncle’s house in Mill-street, in this town. The deceased, who was in his twenty-fourth year, had but recently returned from America in ill health.
I think this John Maguire, who died in July 1872, might be the uncle mentioned in the notice above:
Clare Journal,Thur 18 Jul 1872:
On the 12th inst after a long fit of illness, Mr John Maguire, ironmonger, of this town, aged 58 years, deeply regretted by a numerous circle of friends. Through life he was respected by all who were acquainted with him. R.I.P.
Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Thu May 06, 2021 11:20 am

Mathew MacMahon, from Ennis, "exiled in '67 for taking part in that deplorable rising of the Fenian Brotherhood," is mentioned in this report in the Clare Freeman of Wed 28 Jul 1880:
We have received the first part of a new American publication, entitled the “Irish Soldier and the Sixty-Ninth Regiment Gazette.” It is edited and published by Messrs. Martin J Garrihy, and Mathew MacMahon, respectively, natives of Ennis. It is a spicy, interesting, and truly patriotic publication; and as the prospectus has it, while being American in principle it will be cosmopolitan in tone, instilling a military spirit into the youth and recognizing valor under all flags; it will contain poetry, stories, legends, biographies and portraits of Irish and American soldiers in every land. The present contains an excellent portrait and a sketch of the life of Major-General Winfield Scott Hancock, by Major-General St. Clair A. Mulholland, another Irishman. Yet another Clareman, well known in the West of the County, where he held the post of Dispensary Doctor to the Knock and Labasheeda District, and whose numerous friends and relations stud the Western Coast of Clare, a man who has more than once been noted for his success in his literary, as well as professional career, Dr M Breen, late of Cooraclare, has splendid sketch, which is well worth reading, entitled “My First Campaign.” The Editor in speaking of this article says: “It is really a splendid piece of composition and displays such literary merit that it seems to us the Doctor has mistaken his vocation, though as a medical practitioner, he enjoys a high reputation, a distinguished graduate of several universities, of large and varied experience as surgeon in the late war, and as an active man since its close, Dr Breen is a valuable addition to the residents of the Seventh Ward. With the Editor’s permission we will in our next give the article of Dr Breen, feeling sure that it will both please and interest our readers. Indeed the “Irish Soldier” contains numerous interesting military sketches, it has begun well and we wish it every success. Mr Mathew MacMahon, its publisher, will be remembered in Ennis by his young comrades and friends, he was exiled in ’67 for taking part in that deplorable rising of the Fenian Brotherhood.
Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Sat Jul 17, 2021 10:12 am

I recently visited Spike Island, a ten-minute boat trip from Cobh in Co. Cork, to see the exhibition in the prison there (closed in 2004). Spike Island prison is sometimes called “Ireland’s Alcatraz,” but it was built as a star-shaped fort in the 18th century, and only later was used as a prison. As a way of presenting the history of the place, the exhibition focuses on particular prisoners, and I was surprised and gratified to see that Patrick Tierney, from Ennis, is one of those who is featured (Patrick was one of the six remembered by John Devoy). A better known Fenian prisoner, Edward Peter Kelly, released from Spike Island in 1879 and shipped to New York, was met by a group of people which included Patrick Tierney – see the report in The Pilot, 8 March 1879 (courtesy Boston College Libraries): https://newspapers.bc.edu/?a=d&d=pilot1 ... xIN-------

Another prisoner who gets special attention is Patrick White from Meelick – he is in the War of Independence section. It seems Patrick was playing hurling in the large green area in the middle of the fort, when he went to the barbed wire fence to retrieve the ball, and was shot dead by a nervous sentry: https://www.gaa.ie/news/remembering-patrick-white/

Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Wed Aug 18, 2021 10:05 am

I looked again at Bridget Tierney who married Lot Cullinan in Ennis in 1862, as I think there’s a good possibility that she is the Bridget Cullen who was a sister of Patrick Tierney. This was all that I had found for Bridget and Lot and their family (see page 1 of this thread):
Patrick Tierney’s exact address in Ennis, or the hinterland (inc. Kilmaley – as John Mayer has suggested), is remaining a mystery. I have not succeeded in finding a baptism that fits him. Nor any trace of Bridget Cullen. The name Cullen is not at all common in Co. Clare. In 1901 there are only 5, and this includes three who live in the townland of Cragnagower: Lott Cullen, Cragnagower (Dysert DED) aged 49, his sister, Mary aged 40, and brother Denis aged 38. Interestingly, in 1911 this family is called Cullinan: Lott (mistranscribed as Scott) aged 60, his brother Dennis aged 55, another brother, Peter, aged 47, and sister Mary Anne aged 58.
This change from “Cullen” to “Cullinan” leads me to think that Bridget Cullen may be the Bridget Tierney, who married Lot Cullinan (a different Lot from the one above), in Drumcliff parish on Oct. 03,1862: Brid Tierney, Lott Cullinan; both of Ennis; in the presence of Pat MacMahon and Eliza Power. The baptisms of their children can be found here: http://www.ennisparish.com/genealogy/. I checked three of the baptisms* for the address and it is either Millstreet, or Upper Millstreet, and Lot’s occupation is Pensioner. Lot Cullinan of Millstreet, died Jan. 10, 1879, Pensioner, aged 55; informant: Bridget Cullinan. I failed to find any trace of this family in the 1901 census, but I admit I abandoned attempts at an early stage, thinking that I might easily be on a completely wrong track. Anyway, finding these Cullinans in 1901 is not going to help me find the family, or origins of Patrick Tierney himself.
I can find no trace of any of the family in Ennis after the death of Lot in 1879. His income as a Pensioner (from the army) was probably their only income and without it they would have been destitute. The children were still very young in 1879, ranging in age from 5 to 16. The eldest son, John b. 1863, went to America. I found the record of his death on familysearch.org: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N3CD-49P
That record shows that he died in Chicago on 20 June 1926, and that his parents were Lot Cullinan and Bridget Tierney.

Here are the baptisms of all six children – these and the civil records are the only records I have found for them:
8 May 1863: John of Lot Cullinan and Bridget Tierney, Mill Street, sponsors: Patrick Molony, Mary Tierney (went to Chicago).
21 Jan 1865: Cornelius of same parents, Upper Mill Str.; sponsors: Patrick Molony, Mary Tierney.
3 Jun 1866: Patrick of same parents, Mill Street; sponsors: Michael Dolan, Mary Dolan. (Patrick may be the Patt Cullinan who died aged 0 in 1866 – image unavailable)
16 May 1868: Lott of same parents, Mill Street; sponsors: James Reilly, Margaret Hogan.
18 Jan 1871: Michael of same parents, Mill Street; sponsors: Patrick Tierney, Bridget Doherty.
10 Feb 1874: Charles of same parents, Mill Street; sponsors: Eliza Kirby.

The civil records of the births all show that Lot was a Pensioner – probably from the army.

Sheila

Jimbo
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Jimbo » Thu Aug 19, 2021 5:08 am

WANTS KAISER TO BLOW UP SALOONS

Woman of 87 Would Not Object to Invasion, She Tells Police

Mrs. Bridget Cullinan of 30 Bond street, aged 87 years but remarkably spry, appeared in court this morning to testify against her son, Michael Cullinan, who was arrested by Officer Hayes last evening on her complaint charging him with drunkenness and breach of the peace.

Mrs. Cullinan upbraided her son for his evil ways before court opened and begged that he take the pledge. As she thought more about the matter, she suddenly shouted: "I wish the Kaiser would come to New Britain and blow up every saloon here." She told one of the court officers that her husband has been dead for thirty-four years and since that time she has had nothing but trouble. When told that her son had been sent to jail for fifteen days the aged woman exclaimed: "Oh, Lord! Why couldn't they have made him take the pledge in court instead."

Cullinan is a painter by trade and it was a somewhat unusual coincidence that he had a contract to begin painting Officer Gustave Hellberg's house today. Now the job will have to wait, or else the officer will have to engage another painter.

New Britain Herald, New Britain, Connecticut, 28 April 1916, page 3
Edit: fix typos
Last edited by Jimbo on Sat Aug 21, 2021 3:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Thu Aug 19, 2021 9:39 am

Hi Jimbo

Great! Very good find and well done. That is Bridget Cullinan, indeed, though whether Bridget Cullinan is Bridget Cullen I doubt we will ever know for sure.
This morning I was looking at the forename, Lot, in the 1901 and 1911 censuses and noticed for the first time that the name Lot/Lott is most commonly found in Clare. So I reckon that when you go to familysearch.org and enter “Lot” (no surname) with Ireland as birthplace, the results are quite likely to be for Clare people. It was by this unusual route that I found the Cullinan family at the top of the second page. The 1920 census shows them (Bridget, Patrick, Lot, Michael and Charles) living in New Britain, Hartford, Connecticut: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCNM-WB6
In 1910, they were already living in New Britain, Hartford, Connecticut (where, six years later, Michael got into trouble with the law).
Looking at the original of that 1910 census, I notice Cornelius Cullinn, aged 46, living next door, with his wife Margaret, aged 38, and children, Margaret, Charles, Anna, Mary, Elizabeth, and Veronica. I think this Cornelius must be Bridget’s second son, born 1865: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MK27-53N.
Cornelius and family are no longer living next door in 1920, but they are in Hartford: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCN9-PPM. I can see by the 1930 census that Veronica was called Bonnie: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XMPP-62P

Anyway, IF Bridget Cullinan was Bridget Cullen, then Patrick Tierny had plenty of grandnieces and grandnephews – in Hartford and in Chicago.

Sheila

P.S. I see that Bridget was aged 65 in 1910 and aged 92 in 1920! She probably felt 92.

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Fri Aug 20, 2021 9:24 am

A Charles Cullinan of 385 Broad Street, New Britain, applied for Naturalization in 1906 giving his date of birth as 7 July 1878, but I think he is Charles who was born in 10 Feb 1874 (see baptisms above), and who gives his birthyear as 1882 in 1910, and as 1881 in 1920. The document gives some history of his journey from Ireland to Connecticut, and shows that he arrived at the Port of Niagra, New York, in 1886, and that he has lived in Connecticut since 1896: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:CGY4-LY2M
Although I have no such evidence for the rest of the family, I think they all made the same journey: I think they left Ennis in the mid 1880s and went to Canada, then crossed into the U.S. about 1886, and some years later arrived in Connecticut. The witness to Charles’ character in his application for Naturalization is Michael Murphy.
The US 1900 census shows C[ornelius] Cullinan living in Anne Street, New Britain, aged 32 (born 1869), occupation: Fireman, married 7 years to Margaret. They have had 5 children born to them, of whom only 2 are living: Margaret aged 3 and Charlotte aged 1. Michael Murphy is boarding with them, aged 56 (born in Ireland in 1844): https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M9QR-DKY. This Michael Murphy might be the same Michael Murphy who gave witness to Charles in his application for Naturalization.

Sheila

Jimbo
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Jimbo » Sat Aug 21, 2021 3:07 am

DEATH OF MRS. CULLINAN

Well Known East Main Street Woman Has Lived in City More Than 30 Years—Funeral Wednesday.

Mrs. Bridget Cullinan, widow of the late Lot Cullinan and a resident of New Britain for more than 30 years, died this morning at her home at 335 East Main street. Mrs. Cullinan, who was well known to many of the older townspeople and considered to be one of the oldest residents in this city, was born in Ireland, but came to America when a young woman.

She leaves six sons, John, Cornelius, Patrick, Lot, Jr., Michael and Charles, all of this city, and a daughter Mrs. Bridget Murphy, also of New Britain. Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Mary's church and interment will be in St. Mary's cemetery.

New Britain Herald, New Britain, Connecticut, 1 October 1923, page 2
St Mary's Roman Catholic Church, New Britain, CT.jpg
St Mary's Roman Catholic Church, New Britain, CT.jpg (128.87 KiB) Viewed 4558 times

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Sat Aug 21, 2021 10:01 am

Hi Jimbo

Thank you very much for that death notice and for the picture of the church. I think Mrs Bridget Murphy, mentioned in the notice, might be this Bridget Murphy, wife of Michael Murphy in the 1910 census: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MK2Q-LXH. In later years Bridget lived with her daughter Agnes Cassidy:
Agness F Cassidy (1930): https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XMPP-RVP;
Agnes Cassady (1940): https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K71C-8KS.

Mathew Murphy, the eldest son of Michael Murphy and Bridget, was born in Ireland in 1884 (according to the US 1910 census). I think he is the same Mathew Murphy, who is aged 45 in the 1930 census, married to Mary A; his occupation is Fireman: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XMPP-RJY
However I have found no record of the birth of Mathew (in Ennis Union) and no record of a marriage between Michael and Bridget (in Ennis Union).

I made a mistake in my last posting when I said that the witness in the 1906 application by Charles Cullinan for Naturalization was Michael Murphy; I see now that it was Martin Murphy.

Sheila

Jimbo
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Jimbo » Tue Aug 24, 2021 3:45 am

Hi Sheila,

Martin Murphy versus Michael Murphy was a common mistake. For the Murphy household in the 1910 census in New Britain, the census taker appears to have incorrectly reported "Martin Murphy" as "Michael Murphy". This discrepancy is probably why you were unsuccessful in searching the Irish records from Ennis union. Here is Martin and Bridget Murphy in New Britain in 1900 (a screen print from ancestry since I can't find on familysearch):

1900 Census, Martin Murphy household, New Britain, Hartford County, CT.jpg
1900 Census, Martin Murphy household, New Britain, Hartford County, CT.jpg (114.21 KiB) Viewed 4508 times

Martin and Bridget Murphy reported in 1900 that they had been married for 20 years, and had 12 children, with 7 surviving. Note that in the 1900 census there is another child, Mary Murphy, age 19, who was born in Ireland along with her younger brother Matthew. Agnes who was 17 years old in 1910 is missing from the 1900 census. Their three month old daughter, Florence, appears to have died prior to 1910. And the 1910 census reflects a 13th child, a 9 year old Wilbert who appears to have died prior to 1919.
MARTIN MURPHY DEAD

Hartford Avenue Man Had Been Employed at Russell & Erwin's for Past 35 Years

Martin Murphy of 125 Hartford avenue [Bridget Murphy's address in 1920], a well known resident of this city for many years, died about 6 o'clock this morning in the New Britain General hospital. He was 56 years of age, and was born in Ireland. For 35 years he was employed as a fireman at the Russell & Erwin Manufacturing company. He leaves besides his wife, six daughters [names assume chronological order], Mrs. James Cosgrove [Mary], Mrs. John McInerney [Katy], Mrs. Chester Humphrey [Lizzie], Mrs. Fred Macholtz [Delia], Mrs. Richard Cassidy [Agnes] and Mrs. Vincent Lynch [Clara], and a son Matthew Murphy. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Monday morning at St. Mary's church. The burial will be in St. Mary's cemetery.

Mr. Murphy was a member of Rev. W.A. Harty Branch, A.O.H., Court Prosperity, F. of A., Russell & Erwin Mutual Benefit association, The Woodmen of the World and St. Mary's Holy Name society.

New Britain Herald, New Britain, CT, 30 August 1919
Connecticut death records do not include names of mother and father of the deceased. Russell & Erwin was a manufacturer of padlocks and door locks.

Bridget Tierney Cullinan was the mother of six sons and one daughter. Her daughter, Mrs. Bridget Murphy, was the mother of 13 children, but surviving by 1919 were six daughters and one son.

Mrs. John McInerney listed in the above obituary was Katy Murphy (age 14 in 1900). In the 1930 census, Katherine McInerney ("McCarney" per census taker) was 44 years old, a widow, living with three children, and a "boarder" (her uncle), Patrick Cullinan, age 60, on East Main street in New Britain:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XMPP-RV9

Of the six Cullinan sons, only two brothers survived the Roaring Twenties:
Michael Cullinan

Michael Cullinan, aged 49 years, died this morning at the home of his sister, Mrs. Bridget Murphy of 130 Hartfold avenue. He is survived by his sister and five brothers, John, of Chicago; Cornelius, Patrick, Lot and Charles, of this city. The funeral arrangements which are in charge of John J. Tarrant are incomplete.
New Britain Herald, 19 February 1924
John Cullinan died in Chicago on 20 June 1926 as you already noted. Cornelius Cullinan also died in 1926 according to the findagrave website: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/185 ... s-cullinan
Charles Cullinan.

Charles Cullinan, 44 years old, and a resident of this city for a quarter of a century or more, died at the Norwich State Hospital today following a long illness. His body was brought to this city. He leaves one sister, Mrs. Bridget Murphy, and two brothers, Patrick and Lot Cullinan, all of this city.

The funeral will be held at the funeral home of Joseph A. Haffey, 565 Main Street, and in St. Mary's Church at 10 a.m. Saturday. Burial will be in St. Mary's Cemetery.

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, 31 August 1928
Sheila, it was very interesting the clue you discovered from the naturalization papers of Charles Cullinan that he had entered the USA at the Port of Niagara in New York around 1886, and thus presumably had initially arrived in Canada. How unusual, why did they not arrive in New York or another American port? Previously, you had noted that the Cullinan family would have been destitute upon the death of their father, Lot Cullinan, a military pensioner. A destitute family from Ennis Union who arrived in Canada in the 1880's . . . does this not ring any bells?

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Tue Aug 24, 2021 9:58 am

Hi Jimbo

Yes indeed, I think the Cullinans were among those who were assisted by the Ennis Poor Law Union to go to Canada in the early 1880s. There’s the evidence in the application for Naturalization by Charles, plus I see that John Cullinan and his wife Anne [Bourke], in Chicago, were married in Ontario in 1885: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/207 ... n-cullinan. Many of those who were assisted to go to Canada entered the US. I’ve posted on the subject of Emigration to America assisted by Poor Law: http://www.ourlibrary.ca/phpbb2/viewtop ... 950#p13950, and my last posting is a short notice, which appeared in the Clare Freeman of Wed 11 Jul 1883:
Pauper Emigrants. New York. Monday. It is asserted that assisted pauper immigrants are coming to the United States by way of Canada.
Good work finding that “Michael” Murphy was Martin, and finding Martin and Bridget, junior, in the 1900 census. And good work finding the deaths of Michael, Cornelius and Charles. Those obituaries are so very helpful, and somehow make it all much more real.

Jimbo, I feel we have done enough on the Cullinans of Ennis and West Britain, Conn.. I do believe there’s a good chance that Bridget Cullinan, senior, is the sister of Patrick Tierney, who visited him in Spike Island prior to his release in 1879, and who was called Bridget Cullen in the newspaper reports. And I think we (especially you) have done a good job on the story of Bridget Cullinan’s life and death. But I feel I must emphasize here that it is quite possible that I am mistaken, and that she is not the sister of Patrick Tierney after all.

Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Six Co. Clare Fenians (I.R.B.) remembered by John Devoy

Post by Sduddy » Mon Mar 14, 2022 10:04 am

On the topic of “Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara of Glandree,” Jimbo has posted a piece on Michael Stackpool from Kiladysert, who escaped before he could be arrested and therefore not recorded as a Fenian in Ireland, as far as I know, but described in The San Francisco Call, of 18 Jan 1895, as having been prominent in the uprising in March, 1867. See page 35 of that topic: http://www.ourlibrary.ca/phpbb2/viewtop ... 295#p14295

Sheila

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