John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

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miriam scahill
Posts: 197
Joined: Thu May 07, 2009 7:18 pm

Re: John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

Post by miriam scahill » Fri Mar 16, 2018 9:26 pm

Hi Dawn - now you have cousins in Co. Clare !! - I met my friend - Paddy Waldron - in Ennis, Co. Clare, last night - and told him about your post - sorry for thinking that Col. John was a brother to Col. Crofton Moore. - Paddy has straightened it out !!. !!

dmaynus
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2017 12:07 am

Re: John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

Post by dmaynus » Sat Mar 17, 2018 1:17 am

Hi Miriam, no problem at all. I'm grateful you mentioned my post to Paddy and I've PM'ed my email address to him. I see that Cornell University Library - a few hours away from me by car - has a copy of McGuane's book on Kilrush. Looking forward to reading it ... Dawn

dmaynus
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2017 12:07 am

Re: John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

Post by dmaynus » Sun Mar 25, 2018 4:00 pm

I found this on the Clare County Library website, Kildysart cemetery headstone transcriptions, #368 O'BRIEN:

... Erected by Johanna Vandeleur alias Keane of Clonsnaughta in memory of her beloved husband John Vandeleur who died March 17th 1881 aged 58 years also her son Joseph who died 10th February 1881 aged 9 years ...

There's a reference to a Mary O'Brien at the beginning of the entry who may be a granddaughter of Johanna via Susan who married Pat Hehir.

dmaynus
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2017 12:07 am

Re: John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

Post by dmaynus » Mon May 07, 2018 12:00 am

I'm grateful for the replies concerning John Vandeleur's son Walter who emigrated to Queensland. Since Walter's baptism must have been recorded on one of the missing Kildysart pages, I might never have heard of him otherwise. I purchased and downloaded Walter's death certificate, which shows him to be the son of Susan Keane and John, and probably born late in 1857.

So that led me to look at the Vandeleur emigrants Matthias, James, and Martin, who arrived in Brisbane a few years after Walter. I found Matthias in the Queensland death index and downloaded his death certificate as well. He died in a Brisbane hospital in 1928, was not married, and no parental information was given. It just lists his occupation as miner and indicates that he was from Clare. Based on this information, I don't know if Matthias was Walter's brother or cousin.

I found no marriage record in Australia for James, but there is a James Vandeleur in the Western Australia death index - died in 1895 aged 26. It does not look like any information is available for his origin or his parents, so I'm not ordering a copy of the DC at this time. With a little more searching, I found that James was buried at Coolgardie. John's son James was baptized in Kildysart late in 1866, and I have found no civil records for him in Ireland, so this might be the same James, just a slight difference in age.

Don't have much on Martin yet, except that it does not appear that he died in Australia unless he changed his name. I may have to think about getting a subscription to old Australian newspapers.

Dawn

kbarlow
Posts: 151
Joined: Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:07 am

Re: John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

Post by kbarlow » Tue May 08, 2018 6:00 am

Hi Dawn, the National Library of Aus has a newspaper digitisation project, which is free to access @

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/

Kerry

dmaynus
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2017 12:07 am

Re: John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

Post by dmaynus » Sat May 12, 2018 10:50 pm

Thank you, Kerry!

I've found an article in the Coolgardie Miner reporting the death of James Vandeleur of typhoid fever. He and his brother - the article does not mention the brother by name - had been working at the Mt. Burgess mine. It's also stated that they were former residents of Herberton, North Queensland, which is where Walter worked. I'm now fairly certain that this is the James I've been looking for.

Dawn

dmaynus
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2017 12:07 am

Re: John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

Post by dmaynus » Fri Jun 19, 2020 6:55 pm

I think I have found what happened to another child of John Vandeleur and Johanna Keane. Their son John, born around April 1850 according to parish records, had moved to the United States and had lived in Pennsylvania and western New York. Some time ago I saw a newspaper article reporting the June 1902 death of a John Vandeleur while loading grain into a ship's hold at the Port of Buffalo, New York. Eventually I got around to ordering his death certificate, which I received today. His parents are listed as John Vandeleur and Julia Vandeleur both of Ireland. I guess Julia is yet another English variant of his mother's name. The age is off by 7 years, but as John was unmarried, the informant may have guessed at his age. Burial was in Cohoes, New York, nearly 300 miles east of Buffalo, and I know that at least one Vandeleur relative was still living in the Cohoes area in 1902. I haven't yet found which cemetery. The cause of death was suffocation by grain dust.

A newspaper article in October 1902 stated that letters of administration were filed by John's sister, Catharine Hayes, so my work on the siblings continues.

kbarlow
Posts: 151
Joined: Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:07 am

Re: John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

Post by kbarlow » Sun Jun 21, 2020 2:15 am

Hi Dmaynus,

I have distant relatives in Ireland who also have a Dutch surname and my searching has led me to believe there were possibly 2 groups of migrants from The Netherlands/Belgium who settled in Ireland in the mid-late 1700s. One group seem to be Catholics, escaping the turmoil created by Napoleon's brother, who was administering that part of the world; another group were Protestants encouraged a bit earlier by the English administration to take up land and colonise the Irish. From very early baptism & marriage records that survive for Dublin, I have found most of mine were Catholics, at least after 1820 - but possibly accounted for by marrying into the local population?? The earliest Vandeleur (various spellings - just put in "Vand*)) in those records is 1710, with the church being Church of Ireland (Protestant). My earliest Dutch relatives appear to have started in Dublin, then moved to other counties. It may be worth trawling these early Dublin records, if you haven't already done so. They enabled me to build a really good tree of those now in a county in Ireland, back to the earliest arrival, who appears in the marriage records early 1800.

Good luck, Kerry

PhilDon
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2020 10:53 pm

Re: John Vandeleur of Cloonsnaghta

Post by PhilDon » Mon Jun 22, 2020 5:45 am

Hello dmayanus,

I was hunting through some info' re: Kilrush this morning and came across the following ...
It may be that you are already aware of this .... but if not it may be of some use ....


"Kilrush has existed since the 16th Century but an older church ruin at the local churchyard suggests a much older history. It is thought the name
Cill Rois is derived from Church of the Wood, which would fit with the church ruins location. It was not until the 18th century that it underwent major
development.
This development coincided with the succession of John Ormsby Vandeleur as the wealthiest landlord in the district.
Of Dutch origin, the Vandeleur family was the most prominent landlord family in West Clare. They designed the layout of the town and many of the
present day street names derive from Vandeleur family names.
The Vandeleurs had settled in the area, as tenants to the Earl of Thomond on land at Ballynote, Kilrush, in about 1656. Giles, the first Vandeleur in the
area was the father of the Rev. John Vandeleur who was appointed prebend of Iniscathaigh in March 1687. He was buried at Kilrush in 1727. In 1749,
John Vandeleur, son of the Rev. John, purchased lands in West Clare to the value of £9,826.0.6, from the fortune that had been acquired as one of the
Commissioners for applotting quit rents in Ireland
John Ormsby Vandeleur built the large family home, 'Kilrush House' in 1808. He owned much of Kilrush. With wealth achieved from a financially
beneficial marriage and some political skulduggery, he decided to develop the town. A Scots businessman James Paterson, who had been a gunboat
lieutenant until 1802, assisted him in this project.
Paterson entered the oats trade in west Clare and in 1802 he was given a site on the square from Vandeleur and erected a six-storey building."

Like I said .... may be of some use

Cheers Phil D

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