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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 3:00 pm 
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My family's Parish of O'Callaghan's Mills had a priest named Patrick Quaid (of Limerick) who served for 40 years, going far beyond his official responsibilities. He was a prime mover and shaker in East Clare, in touch with both the working poor and estate owners. I have now enough on him that I can do an article to preserve memory of him and disseminate a documented account of his activism. No one else seems to know about this man. This would potentially interest both Clare residents and the Clare & Limerick portions of the Diaspora. What publications should I consider for placement of the article (likely no longer than two or three pages of text) ?

Also, for anyone reading this, I could use a bit of background on Rev. Laurence Considine, who owned land at Cappalaheen (Kilkishen) just when Rev. Quaid first resided in Clare, at Cappalaheen. Quaid went on to own more property in the parish, but I wonder if Fr. Considine was involved in Quaid's coming to Clare or at least supporting him in his first years.

As a side note, Fr. Quaid was appointed "administrator" for the parish in 1838 (not parish priest though he evidently was doing the duties), likely out of deference to Rev. Jeremiah Tuohy, longtime PP in failing health in his late 70s. No proof positive, but I am sure that Quaid was the one who started the parish record book which starts in Feb 1835, the year he arrived in the parish.

Thanks for any and all comments.

Sharon Carberry
USA


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2017 8:59 pm 
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Hi Sharon

I would suggest "The Other Clare", the annual journal of the Shannon Archaeological and Historical Society. They have a Facebook page but no website, but googling provides all the details. Articles are of a high quality, extensive sources are often given and presentation is excellent.

I'm not sure how widely read it is in Clare/Limerick, but is certainly by committed genealogists/local history interest groups/ archaeologically-minded people. I don't know if many in the diaspora can access it.

As a follow-on to the above I, and I'm sure many others, would be very interested to know if the Clare Library is planning on re-opening the genealogical/history part of the website to further articles, which are then widely available.

Perhaps the Administrator could comment?

Good luck with the article Sharon.

Lucille


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2017 8:07 pm 
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Thanks for the words of encouragement, Lucille. I certainly have my work cut out for me, to make the article interesting but fact-based. Your suggestion of The Other Clare is very appreciated, as the content would be available for a long time in that publication. I share your concern that we no longer have a way to reach the global audience via the Internet and an institution that can provide long-term website content. Things are so fluid now, aren't they ?

Best of the season to you,
Sharon C.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 18, 2017 9:16 pm 
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Location: Қазақстан
Lucille wrote:
I would suggest "The Other Clare", the annual journal of the Shannon Archaeological and Historical Society. They have a Facebook page but no website...

Secretary was listed in 2009 as Peter Wise, 33 Ballycasey Crescent, Shannon, V14VP04, Ireland. E-mail: peter.wise.ie@gmail.com (the '.ie' is important), phone 061-428409 (+353 61 428409 from abroad). Editor: Ristéard UaCróinín. Peter Beirne at the Local Studies Centre (+353 65 6846271) would know where to find the latter.

Best give one of these a call. Phoning usually works best (for me; see also viewtopic.php?f=1&t=21&hilit=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eircom.ie#p31).

Paddy


Last edited by Paddy Casey on Wed Dec 20, 2017 6:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2017 2:03 pm 
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You have gone the extra mile for me on this one, Paddy. Always appreciated. It's not a little thing to nudge a lurker like me into the open with a developed this.

May your New Year be as invigorating as mine,
Sharon C.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:22 pm 
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Hi Sharon

About Fr. Laurence Considine: From what you say it sounds like he lived in the first half of the 19th century and I wonder if you have checked Ignatius Murphy’s “The Diocese of Killaloe 1800 – 1850” (published by Dublin Four Courts Press 1992) for an entry on him. I don’t have a copy of that volume (the middle one of three on the history of the diocese), but I could check it when next in the library, if necessary. Or maybe there is a contributor to the forum who has a copy and can check it.
Ignatius Murphy has an article, “Tenant Rights in County Clare in the 1850s”, in The Other Clare, Vol. XII (1988), in which he gives an outline of the involvement of Fr. Sheehy and Fr. Quaid in the Irish Tenant League in the early 1850s and he gives a sentence or two to the work for tenant rights continued by Fr. Quaid after the death of Fr. Sheehy (1856) until ill health forced him to retire in 1875. Fr. Quaid certainly sounds like he deserves a bit more of an airing.
When Ignatius Murphy published that article in 1988, he was still working on his history of the diocese, so there are no references to it.

Sheila


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:00 pm 
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I appreciate your commenting, Sheila. Now perhaps I should check into Fr. Sheehy as a like-minded activist of the time. I can order any article from The Other Clare from the Allen County Public Library, the institution which devised PERSI and will photocopy any article or section of a book listed in it, for a small fee. I took a few photocopies of Other Clare articles when I was last in the library itself.

For Fr. Laurence Considine, I did locate a reference to the right man, I believe (see below), in my transcription of the O'Callaghan's Mills records and in a list of curates a decade later. The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., a mere 95 miles away from me, holds both the Ignatius Murphy volume set and also Thomas Coffey's The Parish of Inchicronan, so it seems that a quick trip up there is in order. Glad we are now past our most frigid week on record here in Virginia. Getting out of the house at 7 a.m. when is it's minus 3 Fahrenheit is just not what I do.

Also, for a unbiased description of Fr. Quaid, see the other attachment.

Thanks very much,
Sharon C.
Attachment:
Cappalahine 1835  Rev LConsidine.jpg
Cappalahine 1835 Rev LConsidine.jpg [ 13.8 KiB | Viewed 654 times ]
Attachment:
Considine, Crusheen cc 1844-48.jpg
Considine, Crusheen cc 1844-48.jpg [ 23.74 KiB | Viewed 654 times ]
Attachment:
Quaid described.jpg
Quaid described.jpg [ 27.23 KiB | Viewed 654 times ]


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:10 am 
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Hi Sharon

That’s a great library and I hope your visit there gets you most, if not all of what has been written on Fr. Quaid, Fr. Sheehy, and Fr. Considine. And glad to hear the icy blast is ending – we saw the pictures on television.
I am posting a painting by Aloysius O’Kelly, “Mass in a Connemara Cabin”: http://onlinecollection.nationalgallery ... 9462&idx=1.
It was first exhibited in 1883 – many years after the period you are engaged in – but I am posting it here because I think it illustrates very well how much the priest was both part of the people and apart from the people.
Amidst the detail – the picture of the Sacred Heart on the far wall, the half-loft overhead, the dresser with the best plates, the strainer hanging on the side of the dresser, the dash churn for making butter underneath – are the priest’s Chesterfield coat and silk top hat on the chair beside him*.
Best of luck with your research.

Sheila
*These details are noted by Claudia Kinmonth in “A Time and a Place – Two Centuries of Irish Social Life”, published by the National Gallery of Ireland, 2006.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 6:12 pm 
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I have just been reading a new book by Gerard Madden: ‘The Annals of the Poor – Scariff Workhouse Union Counties Clare and Galway 1839 – 1851’ (published by Gerard Madden, East Clare Heritage, 2017, and beautifully illustrated by Paul Berg). And I have come across a couple of passing references to Fr. Quaid and Fr. Sheehy, the most interesting being that they gave evidence to the Devon Commission (I don’t think their reports are included in the extracts that are available at No. 127 of “What’s New”: http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclar ... _clare.htm

But the really interesting thing is that the parish of Kilurnan/Clonlea kept a register of deaths during the Great Famine and in many instances the relationship with the head of household is given, and it seems that the priests responsible for the register were Fr. Quaid and his two curates, Fr. John Tuohy and Fr. Conlon. Madden gives a transcription of the deaths, pp 144 – 159, hitherto unpublished, and it adds greatly to an already most interesting account of the famine years in the Scarriff Union.

Sheila


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2018 2:11 pm 
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Hi everyone,
We are pleased to announce that we are now accepting submissions to www.clarelibrary.ie
The documentation will be reviewed on a quarterly basis for uploading to website.

Clare Admin.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:21 pm 
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I was obviously sleeping at the switch to not sooner see these two outstanding bits of news. I am delighted with both.

First, Sheila, not only is that death register not previously published, its existence has been entirely unknown to the genealogy community. It is not on the filmed parish register nor is there any mention of it there. Its existence has never been mentioned in any report I have read from the Clare Heritage Centre (Corofin), and the LDS Church and gen. book authors John Grenham/James Ryan/etc. have nothing on this. I have known that such registers sometimes exist depending on the local PP, so I have tried keeping my eyes open for anything that could cover the Parish of Clonlea & Killuran. Nothing has cropped up until your posting.

This incredible dearth of information illustrates the divide between traditional publishing and online sites. Even Claire Santry's Irish Genealogy News blog has made no mention of Ger Madden's latest book. I had heard that he was working on something to do with ore mines. So, for rare and obscure data for which there is no alternative source, a year passes after its publication and the people most interested in it have no clue that it exists.

This makes the Library's resumption of accepting donated data all the more significant. I am certainly more encouraged to do my article with knowledge that its contents can reach the community interested in such matters, in Clare and abroad. Also, I have additional material to add to my (U.S.) Civil War soldier database donated a few years ago.

Thank you many times over, Sheila and the moving force at the Library. Sheila, I will contact you privately regarding the death list to see if my ancestors are on it. This might crack the conundrum of who all those Donnellan lines were who were evicted in Dec 1849, a sorting that has defied my efforts and that of other Donnellan descendants, local and in the Diaspora.

Happily,
Sharon C.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 8:44 pm 
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HELLO SHARON,
WE WOULD BE DELIGHTED TO PUBLISH AN ARTICLE ON FR Patrick QUAID IN VOLUME 17 OF SLIABH AUGHTY WHICH IS NOW A BIANNUAL PUBLICATION ON THE HISTORY AND FOLKLORE OF EAST CLARE/SOUTH EAST GALWAY AND PUBLISHED BY EAST CLARE HERITAGE, A GROUP THAT HAS NOT GONE AWAY, DESPITE NO LONGER HAVING A HERITAGE CENTRE.
KILLURAN/CLONLEA WAS IN THE SCARIFF WORKHOUSE UNION AND SO THERE ARE MANY REFERENCES TO SAME IN MY LATEST BOOK PUBLISHED IN DECEMBER 2017.
ONE OF THE FEW PARISHES IN THE COUNTRY WHERE DEATH RECORDS DURING THE FAMINE WERE PRESERVED WAS KILLURAN/CLONLEA. THE DEATH REGISTER GIVES THE PLACE OF DEATH, THE CAUSE OF DEATH AND IN MANY INSTANCES THE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE HEAD OF THE HOUSEHOLD. IT IS THEREFORE OF VITAL GENEALOGICAL INTEREST AND WORTHY OF A SEPERATE STUDY.THERE ARE SEVERAL DONNELLAN DEATHS RECORDED.
I AM PARTICULARLY INTERESTED ALSO IN HIGHLIGHTING THE WORK OF FR SHEEHY PP OF TULLA AS HE WAS A NATIVE OF WHITEGATE, MY HOME TOWN HE WAS CLOSELY ASSOCIATED WITH FR QUAID. MABYE THE TWO COULD BE INCORPORATED IN THE ARTICLE

YOURS SINCERELY
GERARD MADDEN




smcarberry wrote:
I was obviously sleeping at the switch to not sooner see these two outstanding bits of news. I am delighted with both.

First, Sheila, not only is that death register not previously published, its existence has been entirely unknown to the genealogy community. It is not on the filmed parish register nor is there any mention of it there. Its existence has never been mentioned in any report I have read from the Clare Heritage Centre (Corofin), and the LDS Church and gen. book authors John Grenham/James Ryan/etc. have nothing on this. I have known that such registers sometimes exist depending on the local PP, so I have tried keeping my eyes open for anything that could cover the Parish of Clonlea & Killuran. Nothing has cropped up until your posting.

This incredible dearth of information illustrates the divide between traditional publishing and online sites. Even Claire Santry's Irish Genealogy News blog has made no mention of Ger Madden's latest book. I had heard that he was working on something to do with ore mines. So, for rare and obscure data for which there is no alternative source, a year passes after its publication and the people most interested in it have no clue that it exists.

This makes the Library's resumption of accepting donated data all the more significant. I am certainly more encouraged to do my article with knowledge that its contents can reach the community interested in such matters, in Clare and abroad. Also, I have additional material to add to my (U.S.) Civil War soldier database donated a few years ago.

Thank you many times over, Sheila and the moving force at the Library. Sheila, I will contact you privately regarding the death list to see if my ancestors are on it. This might crack the conundrum of who all those Donnellan lines were who were evicted in Dec 1849, a sorting that has defied my efforts and that of other Donnellan descendants, local and in the Diaspora.

Happily,
Sharon C.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:51 pm 
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First, may I say that I know now that my family's patriarch during the Famine Years did not die of starvation. That is so meaningful and known only through the death register kept by Fr. Quaid.

Mr. Madden, the question burning in my mind is how did you find the register ? In whose custody has it been ? We in the gen. community need to know this in order to unearth similar valuable data. I also urge informing Claire Santry regarding the existence of the book on the Scariff Workhouse, including the Parish of Clonlea & Killuran death register and whatever similar lists it may contain.

I view the Sliebh Aughty publication as a very good recommendation for my article. I fear that if I have to delay writing in order to research Fr. Sheehy, perhaps my article will never get done. I hope that my article simply serves as a base for more research.

I am sorry that the Church of Ireland found a new use for the building that East Clare Heritage had so successfully used for its headquarters. There is another restored building in an East Clare community which might be used similarly (although not continually or solely): the Kilkishen Cultural Centre in a former Church of Ireland building, fully restored and equipped with modern amenities.

I hope you can sense the excitement caused by mention of your new book. Thanks so much for becoming a Forum member so that we can have the latest news.

Sharon Carberry


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