Library Forum

A partnership of Clare County Library and Pictou-Antigonish Regional Library
It is currently Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:23 am

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2017 10:48 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 564
Here is my transcription of Miltownmalbay baptisms 1831 – 1855: https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 1/mode/1up.

Note 1: The middle name given for the father of the child, in the earlier part of this register, is a marker for which family he belonged to – not a middle name as we think of it nowadays. This way of distinguishing families is still used in west County Galway, where Irish is still spoken.

2: The priest used his own shorthand for the townlands (Residence), which I thought I would grasp as time went on, but never fully grasped. I hope the Miltownmalbay people, at least, will be able to make something of my efforts, or that somebody will improve on them.

3: There are no gaps in the baptisms until we come to January 1839. Maybe the Night of the Big Wind (Jan. 6, 1839) caused damage to the chapel and put the register out of reach. The following few months are in higgledy-piggledy order – it looks like pages fell out and were stuck in back to front. There are more examples of disorderly pages in the late 1840s.

4: This register shows more variety in the notes on offerings (payments), than any other register I’ve transcribed. Apart from the word “poor”, which signified that the priest did not expect an offering, I did not attempt to transcribe these notes, but they are interesting. The word “collop” turns up at the top of page 102, right-hand side – I think that’s the amount of land needed for the grazing of a cow. The word “Bailwick” turns up at the bottom of page 108, right-hand side – I don’t know what that could refer to, but it sounds quite medieval .
The word “clear” is the usual note, meaning nothing more is owed, but as time goes on and we enter the 1840s, we see that work was often accepted in lieu of cash and there are a couple of examples of a tally system being used to count off the number days owed, i.e. three upright strokes are crossed off. Also, the Irish word for work, Obair, in Gaelic script, appears. Were these variations used in order to be perfectly clear and to hold people to their word? Who can say. Sometimes payment is deferred until “after Michaelmas”, or until “after Miltown Fair, 2nd Feb.”

5: As usual I will have confused some names, for example, Carny and Canny, Keavy and Keary, Thynne and Flynn, Liston and Sexton, Morony and Molony, Goonan and Gorman, O’Connell and O’Connor, Coghlan and O’Loghlan, Burke and Rourke, Kinnelly and Kinulty, Moony and Morony. I hope researchers will take this into account.

Sheila


Attachments:
Miltownmalbay baptisms1831-1855 by father's surname.xlsx [473.59 KiB]
Downloaded 226 times
Miltownmalbay baptisms1831-1855 by mother's surname.xlsx [476.63 KiB]
Downloaded 93 times
Miltownmalbay baptisms1831-1855.xlsx [468.63 KiB]
Downloaded 96 times


Last edited by Sduddy on Fri Dec 29, 2017 10:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2017 10:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 564
Here is my transcription of Miltownmalbay baptisms 1855 – 1858: https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 1/mode/1up.

Some marriages were entered by mistake in page 27. I included these in my transcription of the marriages, 1857-1858.

Sheila


Attachments:
Miltownmalbay Baptisms 1855- 1858 by father's surname.xlsx [93.79 KiB]
Downloaded 102 times
Miltownmalbay Baptisms 1855- 1858 by mother's surname.xlsx [90.87 KiB]
Downloaded 81 times
Miltownmalbay Baptisms 1855- 1858.xlsx [94.51 KiB]
Downloaded 81 times
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2017 10:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 564
Here is my transcription of Miltownmalbay marriages 1856 – 1858: https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 1/mode/1up.

A couple of baptisms were entered by mistake in page 53, right hand side. I included these in my transcription of the baptisms: 1855 - 1858.

By very early 2018, I hope to have completed baptisms and marriages 1858 - 1880.

Sheila

Edited July 05, 2018, to amend marriages by bride's surname - I hadn't sorted the data correctly first time round.


Attachments:
Miltownmalbay Marriage 1856-1858 by bride.xlsx [51.42 KiB]
Downloaded 26 times
Miltownmalbay Marriage 1856-1858 by groom.xlsx [49.81 KiB]
Downloaded 105 times
Miltownmalbay Marriage 1856-1858.xlsx [55.78 KiB]
Downloaded 111 times


Last edited by Sduddy on Thu Jul 05, 2018 2:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2017 9:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:59 pm
Posts: 140
Sheila

Your work on these transcriptions is absolutely phenomenal, but I really have to take my hat off to you to have tackled Miltownmalbay. I have been up and down those records and they are difficult. Well done and thank you.

Probably the reason for the difference in quality, and also quantity, of the records after 1839 is that the parish was divided that year, with the southern half being hived off to make a new parish of Kilmurry Ibrickane, the northern half being named Kilfarboy. The PP of the old Miltownmalbay parish, Father Anthony McGuane, died that year, his brother, Father Patrick McGuane, took over in Kilfarboy and his nephew, or grand nephew, Father Edmund Patrick Barry, took on the new Kilmurry Ibrickane parish. I'm quoting "History of Kilmurry Ibrickane" by Father P Ryan PP (1969) in case anyone thinks I'm making up this nepotism!!!

Lucille


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2017 10:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 564
Thank you Lucille.
Congratulations to you on the publication of ‘Women of Clare’ (Clare Roots Society 2017). I bought it the last time I was in Ennis as a Christmas present to myself, and have put it away until then. It’s a precaution I take every year – I don’t leave it to chance that someone else will know what to give me. I’m looking forward to unwrapping it and reading it.

Sheila


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2017 12:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:59 pm
Posts: 140
Hope you enjoy it Sheila

Lucille


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 11:20 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 564
I now have doubts about the surname I transcribed as “Curreen”, and think it might be “Cunneen”. If somebody gets back to confirm that it should be Cunneen, I will make the necessary changes.

Sheila


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 11:24 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 564
Here is my transcription of Miltownmalbay baptisms 1858 – 1881: https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 1/mode/1up

There are a couple of instances here of the names Joan and Susan being used for the same person. I think the actual name was Siobhan. If you check “Siobhan” on Wikipedia and you will see that it comes from the same stem as Joan and Jeanne. In Scotland it was anglicized as Judith.

Here are my ideas on the subject: There is no letter “J” in the Irish alphabet and “J” words entering the language (from other languages)* were spoken with a “Sh” sound*, similar to a French “J”. The name James became Seamus (pronounced “Shaymus”), and John became Sean (pronounced “Shaun”). I believe that, when presented with a Seamus, or a Sean, the priest wrote James, or John, and that on being presented with a Siobhan he usually wrote Joan, or Joanna. But (and here it gets a bit more difficult) he sometimes thought that Susan fitted better. The official in the local registration office, likewise, sometimes wrote Joan/Jane, and sometimes Susan. I believe (and remember) that Susan was spoken with a Sh sound, and I believe that, in Irish-speaking districts at least, Judith was spoken with a soft “J”, and that Judy was interchangeable with Susy. Judith, according to Wikipedia, was another anglicisation of Siobhan.
The names Susan and Joanna did not always come by the “Siobhan” route, of course, and then they presented no problem to anybody.

A note on the pronunciation of Siobhan: The letter “h” in Siobhain signifies a softening of the “b” which precedes it – in Gaelic script it was just a dot over the “b”. In the South and East of Ireland “b” is softened to “v” and the name is pronounced “Shivaun”, with the stress on the second syllable. As you go towards the North West, “b” is softened to “w” and the name is pronounced “Shewan”, with the stress on the first syllable - this sounds very like Joan.

*In earlier Irish, the letter “J” entered the language as “I”, or “E”, and so “Jesus” is “Iosa”, and St. John the Baptist is “Naomh Eoin Baiste”. This Eoin can be Owen, Eoghan, Eugene, or John.

Sheila


Attachments:
Miltownmalbay baptisms 1858-1881 by father's surname.xlsx [335.37 KiB]
Downloaded 101 times
Miltownmalbay baptisms 1858-1881 by mother's surname.xlsx [335.99 KiB]
Downloaded 78 times
Miltownmalbay baptisms 1858-1881.xlsx [342.68 KiB]
Downloaded 73 times
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 11:35 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 564
Here is my transcription of Miltownmalbay marriages 1859 – 1881: https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 1/mode/1up

Thank you Jimbo for freeing up the space. Next time there's a problem I will do some more pruning of my own attachments.

Sheila


Attachments:
Miltownmalbay Marriages 1859-1880 by groom.xlsx [78.86 KiB]
Downloaded 128 times
Miltownmalbay Marriages 1859-1880 by bride.xlsx [79.05 KiB]
Downloaded 104 times
Miltownmalbay Marriages 1859-1880.xlsx [86.32 KiB]
Downloaded 80 times
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 10:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Mar 20, 2009 12:58 am
Posts: 277
Location: Qld Australia
Re Curreen/Cuneen
Not sure if this helps Sheila, but I did a quick search on the 1901 census:

Cuneen - 21 bearers of the name in Clare, 126 in all counties
Curreen - zero bearers of the name in Clare, 40 in all counties, including one family in Galway for which the household return shows an unmistakable spelling of Curreen


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 10:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 564
Thanks Murf for helping with Cunneen. I’ve changed all the Curreens to Cunneens and put them in red to show where I’ve made the changes. There are only 9.

Cunneen and Rabbit/Rabbitt/Rabbitte are the same name. The Irish word for rabbit is coinin. The interchangeability of Cunneen and Rabbitt is mentioned on this forum in a posting by Paddy Casey on the topic “Bourke/Cannenn family”: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=2911&hilit=Cunneen#p4622

The Doora-Kilraghtis baptisms, 1821 – 1862, show that on the occasion of the baptism of Patrick Fitzgerald on 14 March 1830 (pg 45 right-hand side) the careful priest gives his mother as Rabbit/Cunneen.

Sheila


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 10:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:43 pm
Posts: 12
Hello Sheila,

Well done on the transcription of these records. My great great Grandfather was Jeremiah (Darby) Leary. I had found his records before through the usual channels but your transcription of a baptism in 1842 (child name John) added two words "free, turnpike" in townland "Cluain". The latter could be Cloonboney? The usual land records show him in Breaffa and/or Leigard. It is likely he held small plots in both townlands. I am assuming the word free means he was not required to pay the priest because perhaps he managed the turnpike?? No payment by the priest may have been required. I have been unable to find out where the turnpike was but it may be relevant that his daughter, my great grandmother Mary Leary married Bernard Carroll, who lived in Ennis and was a coachman on the Mail Car. You or perhaps others may have views on this unusual insertion in the record.

Deirdre Carroll


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am
Posts: 564
Hi Deirdre

I agree that “free turnpike” was a payment in kind for the baptism. That particular priest thought of all kinds of methods of payment. I looked for a turnpike on the 1842 map http://maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,505593,679189,11,7 but found none, but I suppose Jeremiah/Darby Leary did operate a turnpike somewhere in the area and that’s how his daughter met her future husband. Nice story.

Sheila


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2018 6:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:43 pm
Posts: 12
Hi Sheila,

Thanks for reply. I couldn't find the turnpike either on various maps. At any rate, the discovery of the turnpike gave a new impetus to research on my family history. Anything I have discovered on my Leary, and much of my Carroll history, has been based on my own research as my grandfather Michael Carroll of Ennis died when his children were quite young and I had little to go on. This find was a real nugget!

Deirdre C,


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 25 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group