Carrig/ O'Connor

Genealogy, Archaeology, History, Heritage & Folklore

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Sduddy
Posts: 956
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Carrig/ O'Connor

Post by Sduddy » Wed Jan 08, 2020 11:33 am

Hi Colleen

Here is a preview of Oceans of Consolation: Personal Accounts of Irish Migration to Australia, by David Fitzpatrick: https://books.google.ie/books/about/Oce ... &q&f=false

Only some pages are available to read, but what’s available show a couple of mentions of a Michael Carrigg. Michael Carrick and his wife (Susan Normile) sailed on board the Monsoon, sometime in the early 1850s (I can’t find the date). I wonder if this Michael Carrigg is a brother of Timothy Carrigg. If you are interested, go to chapter 2, which is entitled “‘Whistling a Jig to a Milestone’: Michael Normile, 1854-65”. The chapter is mainly about the letters written by Michael Normile from the Hunter Valley, New South Wales, Australia, to his family in Caheraderry in the parish of Killaspuglonane. The parish of Killaspuglonane, by the way, is just south of the parish of Killilagh and west of the parish of Kilshanny: http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclar ... lenane.htm
Michael Normile’s letters mention neighbours who also emigrated to Australia and among these is Michael Carrigg, who settled in Queensland. At the bottom of page 54, David Fitzpatrick writes, “He [Michael Normile] remained in close touch with his married sister Susan in Moreton Bay (Brisbane), who had arrived there with her husband Michael Carrigg and their three children only a fortnight after the Araminta reached Sydney”. Fitzpatrick explains that, at first, the Carriggs kept a large hotel in Brisbane and later a boarding-house in Tambo.
There is another mention of Michael Carrigg on page 83: Michael Normile writes in August 1860 that he had received a letter from his sisters in America the previous January which he then sent to his sister Susan Carrigg (nee Normile) in Morten Bay. He says, “Michl Carrigg & family are doing well. I got a letter of late from them. I generally hear from them once a month”.
The letters show that neighbours and relatives availed of a system of sponsorship to enable them to emigrate. Table 2 (pages 58-9) summarises the chain of migration of the neighbours that Michael Normile had been aquainted with when he lived in Caheraderry. He was delighted to see these people coming.

Unfortunately the Lisdoonvarna parish records, which begin at 1854, do not show any records for Michael Carrigg and Susan as they had left for Australia before that date.

Sheila

murf
Posts: 345
Joined: Fri Mar 20, 2009 12:58 am
Location: Qld Australia

Re: Carrig/ O'Connor

Post by murf » Wed Jan 08, 2020 10:00 pm

I have been only loosely following this thread so this may be superfluous, but the shipping record shows that a labourer Michael Carrick(33), his wife Susan(29) and three daughters Mary(11), Catherine(3) and Bridget(2) all arrived in Moreton Bay on 13 Aug 1854 on board the Monsoon, which had left Liverpool on 13 May 1854.

Sduddy
Posts: 956
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Carrig/ O'Connor

Post by Sduddy » Thu Jan 09, 2020 3:41 pm

Hi Murf
Thanks for that help with the date of sailing.
Sheila

Sduddy
Posts: 956
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Carrig/ O'Connor

Post by Sduddy » Wed Feb 12, 2020 10:35 am

Hi Colleen

Here is a small scrap of history that may be of interest to you. I came upon it when I was reading “A note on the Uí Chiaróg clerical lineage of Rathblathmaic”, by Luke McInerney: http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclar ... thmaic.htm
(first published in The Other Clare, Vol. 36 (2012).

The main body of the article is about the O’Keroge family, but there is a mention of the Carrigg family of Kilfenora that your Timothy Carrigg must surely be descended from. You will need to scroll down to the second last paragraph (page 56) where McInerney says,
Ainsworth, in the index to his work Inchiquin Manuscripts, erroneously places the name O’Keroge under the appellation Carrig.48 This, of course, is incorrect for Carrig is a truncated and anglicised version of Mac Con Chairrge, a lineage whose patrimony was further west at Kilfenora.49 And who, according to the poem on the Dál gCais by Maoilín Óg Mac Bruaideadha, scion of the learned seanchaidhe lineage Clann Bhruaideadha, were a distinct sept and without clerical origins.50

49 R. Simington, Books of Survey and Distribution, Being Abstracts of Various Surveys and Instruments of Title, 1636-1703, [Co. of Clare], Kilfenora parish.

50 See Mac Bruaideadha’s poem titled Cuirfead comaoin ar Cloinn Táil wherein it states of the Mac Con Chairrge: a-nois cuirim o clan tail/ Mec Con C[h]airrge is Í Beoláin/cia an uairsi dob aipce im reir/ d’úaisle na haicme haimce íad séin [now I claim from Clan Táil/the Mac Con Carrigs and the O’Bolans /who are now matured in my service/they are noble class]. Damian McManus & Eoghan Ó Raghallaigh (ed) A Bardic Miscellany, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2010, p.176.
Sheila

Blondie
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:43 pm

Re: Carrig/ O'Connor

Post by Blondie » Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:48 pm

Wow, this is all great stuff! I so appreciate it. On another note. I recently found 2 people about a 4th cousin DNA match to me that has a Maggie Conner in their trees. She married a man in Kentucky,US about 1867. Unfortunately it doesn't give her age,but listed as her witness is Isaac Conners. If you remember my 3rd greatgrandmother lists that name as her father, so its definitely a family name,but I surely can't find him!

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