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Roland Curtin, born in Dysert, Co. Clare, in 1764

Posted: Sat Jul 23, 2016 10:51 am
by Sduddy
An article on the MacCurtins, ‘The origins of Clann Chruitin: chronicler-poets of the learned Gaelic tradition’, by Luke McInerney, first published in the Other Clare vol. 38 (2014), pp 19-30, and later donated by him to clarelibrary.ie http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclar ... ruitin.pdf gives us an idea of the standing of that family in Clare in medieval times, and later.
Some names that recur in the MacCurtin clan are Roland, Constance, Andrew/Aindrias and Austin/Aibhistin/Augustine, and I am sure that Fr. Constance Curtin, named the article in the LondonderrySentinel of 27th Apr. 1833, was a descendant. http://www.ourlibrary.ca/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=204
Another descendant, I’m sure, was Roland Curtin, who (according to the entry on findagrave http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cg ... 475&df=all&) was born in Dysert, Co. Clare, in 1764, educated in Paris and arrived in Philadelphia in 1793.
He was a son of Aibhistin Curtin, who had married Mary O’Loghlen, a sister of Colman O’Loghlen (the father of Sir Michael O’Loghlen of Drumconora). Roland set up a successful iron works in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, and his son, Andrew, became Governor of Pennsylvania and was a staunch supporter of Abraham Lincoln. An entry on Andrew Curtin on Wikipedia gives plenty of information.
Some Curtin descendants were still living in the townland of Dysert, in the parish of Dysert, at the time of Griffith’s Valuation. Hugh Curtin was leasing Plot 1: a house and 80 acres from Francis H. Synge. The house was called Dysert Cottage and was very close to the castle. The later 25” map (c. 1900) shows some traces of the ruins of the house, a little to the east of the castle. There is no trace of it in the landscape now.

Sheila

Re: Roland Curtin, born in Dysert, Co. Clare, in 1764

Posted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 5:27 pm
by Sduddy
On Sunday last at his house at Dysert, at the very advanced age of 96 years, Mr. Augustine Curtin; until within a year of his death he was able to walk and ride about, and within the last two years has several times rode over 20 miles in one day – he retained his faculties to the last.
Ennis Chronicle - Wednesday, September 26th, 1827; Clare Journal - September 27th, 1827.

Sheila

Re: Roland Curtin, born in Dysert, Co. Clare, in 1764

Posted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 11:29 am
by Sduddy
Mr. Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania, is mentioned in a short outline of the history of Carmody’s Hotel, Church St., Ennis, (later Abbey St.), in A Broad History of a Narrow Street: Abbey Street – Ennis, by Brian Spring. Spring names a few well known people who stayed at Carmody’s and adds, “A Mr. Curtin, the Governor of Pennsylvania, also stayed in Carmody’s in 1867.” (p 98).

Sheila