Limerick and Clare soldiers in the Bombay Army

Genealogy, Archaeology, History, Heritage & Folklore

Moderators: Clare Support, Clare Past Mod

Post Reply
Paddy Casey
Posts: 743
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2007 3:53 pm
Location: Внешняя Громболия
Contact:

Limerick and Clare soldiers in the Bombay Army

Post by Paddy Casey » Tue Dec 01, 2015 10:48 am

This meaty list was abstracted from the Families in British India Society website in September/October 2015 by Brian Hodkinson, Limerick Museum and can be browsed/searched at
http://www.limerick.ie/sites/default/fi ... 739_1_.pdf

Paddy

mgallery
Posts: 182
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 6:27 pm

Re: Limerick and Clare soldiers in the Bombay Army

Post by mgallery » Fri Dec 04, 2015 9:58 am

There are other similar lists available. My gt gt gt uncle David Kenny of Treanmanagh shows up on the Alphabetical List of the Officers of the Indian Army at the Madras presidency from 1784 to 1838

David Kenny (- 1835) was a surgeon. I do not know where he qualified. He joined the army in 1828 as an assistant surgeon (Alphabetical List of the Officers of the Indian Army at the Madras presidency from 1784 to 1838). He is named in his father’s will in 1833 as stationed in a foreigh clime. He died in 1835 in India in Masulipatam.

Paddy Casey
Posts: 743
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2007 3:53 pm
Location: Внешняя Громболия
Contact:

Re: Limerick and Clare soldiers in the Bombay Army

Post by Paddy Casey » Fri Dec 04, 2015 10:35 am

Life was pretty short in those days and even shorter in the tropics. If the malaria or yellow fever or typhoid or cholera or alcohol didn't cut you down the local tribesmen would. Many years ago I spent some time in Persia and came across English cemeteries with gravestones, many of them very simple, going back to the 1700s. Many were simple memorials to very young English soldiers, some of them "on (their) way to India". Several had died of "yellow fever", a "diagnosis" which presumably covered anything ending in jaundice, most likely kala-azar in Persia. The cemeteries were tended by elderly English ladies who had somehow ended up as flotsam in Persia and taken root there. Those ladies will be long-gone, of course, and I don't know whether the cemeteries are still there. They would be (or would have been) full of genealogical information.

Post Reply