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PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 12:31 pm 
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Found in passing this morning:

"Ghosts of Kilrush

Author: Joe Riley

ISBN: 1928928137

Description:

Ghosts of Kilrush is the heart-felt memoir of a young English boy, abandoned by his father in small town in western Ireland, who was raised as a beloved son by an Irish family who treated him as their own. Joe Riley takes a look back at a dozen years after World War II as he affectionately recalls the world of Kilrush, County Clare, and it’s many colorful characters who influenced his childhood, including his Auntie May and Uncle Andrew DeLoughery, and their family, neighbors and friends. The stories about the many characters of the town will have the reader laughing out loud. The infamous Paddy Griffin, affectionately called “Pollock the liar” behind his back. John Joe and how he became a councilor. Paddy Hawes, the IRA barber who used the time cutting Riley’s hair to tell him the evils of being English. Contrasting these warm accounts is the story of his birth mother, whom Joe had not seen for six years, arriving for a visit and taking him ‘home’ to meet his other brothers and sisters. The horror he felt in their way of life compared to his and his happy return to Kilrush. This memoir is a tribute to Auntie May and Uncle Andrew, their family, and the community of Kilrush who all turned Joe Riley’s childhood from one of grim isolation into an experience of loving acceptance. This memoir was written as told to Alan C. Atkins, a friend of Joe Riley's in Manila, who is a professional writer and author. "

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 1:43 pm 
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Another book by a Kilrush descendant:

One Life at a Time: A New World Family Narrative, 1630-1960
Author: R. Thomas Collins
ISBN: 0966788303

"In the spring of 1863, my great-grandfather, James Collins, a 22-year-old blacksmith from the village of Kilrush in County Clare, Ireland, stood on the deck of an Atlantic sailing ship watching as the port of Liverpool disappeared over the horizon. Near him, contemplating the weeks-long ocean crossing, was his father, Sinon, age 50. The father and son were aboard an 181-foot sloop bound for New York, escaping a ruined economy and destined never to return to their home village on the banks of the Shannon River in western Ireland.
...
James and his father, Sinon, arrived in New York May 25, 1863. On the ship's passenger list compiled in the Port of New York, Sinon was listed as passenger number 514, James, as number 520. Both had made the voyage booked on the lower deck and both, despite their trade as blacksmiths, were listed as "labourers."

Part Three - Builders of the New Union 1840-1960
109. Henry Elliot Savage/Theodosia Caroline Knapp
110. Sinon Collins/Mary Langan
111. Patrick Howard/Susannah Lunney
112. Thomas Francis O'Connell/Catherine Sheedy
113. James Collins/Mary Kearney
114. James Reynolds Howard/Mary Ann MaGee
115. Willis Isaac Savage/Louisa Close Howard
116. James Michael Collins/Alice O'Connell
117. Robert Thomas Collins/Mary Close Savage

Further description at:
http://ravensyard.typepad.com/home/one_ ... index.html

posted by Sharon Carberry
just in passing


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 2:31 pm 
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Terry Glavin, Waiting for the Macaws, and other stories from the age of extinctions (Viking Canada, 318 p., 2006)

Review online at:
http://www.dooneyscafe.com/content/view/448/30/

"The commanding image of Glavin’s book is that of taking a “long walk.” The walk begins quite a ways from Glavin’s Mayne Island, but nonetheless close to “home” of another sort. It’s an actual, rather than metaphoric, walk through the local “rolling hills, bogs and woods” around his mother’s ancestral family farm in Coolreagh, Clare County, Ireland...

Glavin sets off on his walk in the countryside around Coolreagh. Immediately, he makes the first crucial move in how he’s going to position himself in fashioning this account. In Glavin’s view, the landscape is not just rolling hills, Irish bogs, woods, fields, and mountains in the near distance, it’s also a veritable storybook.

For example, Glavin finds himself “beside a field called the Castle Field, which takes its name from a craggy and vine-covered rock in the middle of it, the remnant of a stone fort built by local tribesmen loyal to Brian Boru, the great warrior-chief who defeated the Vikings at Clontarf in 1014. In the Castle Field you will notice the ground beginning to rise gently, and if you walk that way, up Blackguard’s Hill, you’ll find yourself heading through Ballyvaughan into the Slieve Bernagh mountains.”
But 'if you walk in the other direction, northward, you will eventually find yourself in the townland of Fossamore, and the ground begins to rise there, too, into the Slieve Aughty mountains. It’s wilder up that way. Above Fossamore is Powlagower, the Goat’s Hole, and Tabernagat, the Well of the Cats. There is the Struthanalunacht, the Stream of New Milk, which once ran white with milk but long ago it turned to water, they say, when a woman washed her feet in it. There are people who live at Cloonusker who say that at the end of the world, the final battle of the last war will be fought up there, above Gortaderra, in a place called the Valley of the Black Pig, and on that last day of battle the Stream of New Milk will turn to blood.' "

Tom Glavin's article entitled Biddy's Ruin
http://www.lostmag.com/issue4/biddy.php
an excerpt:
"But the day Christine and I went to see what had become of Biddy's ruin, nothing else in the countryside around had vanished. Everything was in its proper place. The dead were in the ground, and the living were above it. That morning we'd walked together in the northern quarter of Coolreaghbeg, and Christine remembered coming there with the whole family, with a pony and cart, to cut turf for the fireplace. It was in that quarter that an army of Anglo-Normans had been lured into a bog by the local Dalcassian tribesmen who had united under Conor O'Brien, in 1259. They were Gradys, McInerneys, and McNamaras, and O'Hynes from Gort, and they surrounded the foreigners, and the foreigners died thrashing under the weight of their own armor. At the end of the day, 700 of their corpses were sinking into the mire, becoming part of the land, becoming part of its stories."

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2007 12:43 pm 
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Clare Journeys in America:
ISBN: 0-9544694-3-7

"This biographical directory contains the concise life stories of twenty-nine outstanding people who have embodied the close connections between the United States and the county of Clare.

The book is a must for all those interested in their experience and serve as an indispensable guide to the gallery of extraordinary individuals who have kept the beacons burning between Clare and America.

These people include John Philip Holland, Johnny Patterson, Edna O'Brien and Mike McTigue."

ordering info on the publisher's site:
http://www.hi-table.com/clare.html

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2007 1:29 pm 
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Books (mostly those not previously posted to date on Clare message lists)
currently up for sale at:
http://www.iol.ie/~celticbk/olc.htm

Just reading the descriptions is educational. Use "clare" to search throughout the page and see other, more well-known books also on this list.

Perhaps someone could check on whether any of these are already in
the Clare library's collection, and, if not, bring these to the attention of
the person in charge of acquisitions.


198. With 'The Thirty-Second' in the Peninsular and other Campaigns. by Harry Ross-Lewin of Ross Hill, County Clare, edited by John Wardell. DUBLIN, Hodges, Figgis & Co. Ltd. 1904. 368 pages. excellent copy.

212. Feakle. Kieran Sheedy. COUNTY CLARE, Feakle GAA Hurling Club. 1990. 507 pages. dust wrapper. near fine. a detailed local and sporting history of an east Clare parish

266. North Munster Studies, Essays in honour of Monsignor Michael Moloney. Etienne Rynne editor. LIMERICK, The Thomond Archaeological Society. 1967. 535 pages. illustrated. A major collection of articles on the archaeology, history, numismatics and folklife of counties Limerick, Clare and Tipperary.

292. A Short Tour in the County Clare 1780. edited by Henry Henn. Cambridge, Trinity Hall. Ballinakella Press, 1986 reprint of the 1893 edition. 60 pages.

304. Kilmurry McMahon and Killofin Remembered. An accurate and detailed account of a Rural Parish in the barony of Clonderlaw, Co. Clare. Paul Markham. ENNIS, Clare Champion. circa 1991. 236 pages.

429. John Holland, 1841-1914. Inventor of the Modern Submarine. Richard Knowles Morris. United States Naval Institute, Maryland. 1966. 212 pages. illustrated. A detailed work on the quiet, unassuming Clareman, inventor, designer and builder of the first practical submarine, 'the father of the modern submarine'. Holland was born in Liscannor.

480. The Westropp Family 1250-2000. LONDON, 2000. 252 pages. The Westropps were one of the principal landlord families in counties Limerick, Clare and Cork.

518. Disturbed Ireland: Being the Letters written during the Winter of 1880-81. Bernard H. Becker. LONDON, Macmillan & Co. 1881 pages. 338 pages. In late 1881 Becker visited some of the most disturbed areas of the country. The result is a detailed account of activities in Counties Clare, Mayo, Kerry and Cork. Becker a correspondent of the Daily News newspaper was very sympathetic to the landlord's cause.

596. Danta Aindreis Mhic Cruitin. Liam O'Luaighnigh. ENNIS, Clare Champion Offices. circa 1935. xiii, 64 pages. The poems in this volume which were transcribed by O'Luaighnigh from manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy and the British Museum are 'the first attempt which has been made to present the poems of Andrew MacCurtin to the Irish Public'. [preface] MacCurtin, who was born in 1650 and died in 1738, was a member of a famous Clare Bardic family and composer of a number of well known poems.

599. A View of the Conduct and Writings of Mr Charles Lucas being an Answer to some Passages in the Eighteenth Address of C. Lucas reflecting on the late Sir Samuel Cooke. No. II. Samuel Davey. DUBLIN. 1749. 15 pages. A defence of Cooke which reveals much incidental information on the intrigue which was an integral part of the prevailing Dublin City political scene in mid-eighteenth century Ireland, much of which involved the Clare born radical Charles Lucas.

690. The Autobiography of General Sir O'Moore Creagh. General Sir O'Moore Creagh. LONDON, Hutchinson & Co. CIRCA 1923. 304 pages. Creagh, who was born in Cahirbane, County Clare had an illustrious military career with the British Army in various campaigns

692. Stacpoole: The Owners of a Name. John Stacpoole. NEW ZEALAND, Auckland. Private Circulation. 1991. 185 pages. A detailed limited edition history of a family who were among the leading landed dynasties in Counties Clare and Limerick for centuries.

752. Some Destroyed Sites at Shannon Airport, County Clare. Etienne Rynne. 1964. 32 pages. Proceeding of the Royal Irish Academy, DUBLIN.

1049. A History of Clare Abbey and Killone [Clare]. Joseph Power. circa 1988.

1254. A History of the Parish of Rath [Clare]. Michael MacMahon. 1979.

1482.The Poor Law Records of Counties Limerick, Clare and Tipperary. Listed and introduced by S. C. O'Mahony. LIMERICK. 1979. 32 pages.

1533. he Riddle of the Irish. J. Chartres Molony. Kennikat press. 1971 reprint of the 1927 edition. 248 pages. A Study of the Irish character by the Clare born author.

1721. The Crooked Ash, Scariff Club History [ Clare] . Tim McGillycuddy. [1983] 134 pages.

1930. The Tryal and Conviction of Patrick Hurly, Late of Moughna, in the County of Clare, Gent. in his Majesty's Court of King's Bench in Ireland, the 31st of May 1701, upon two Indictments, the one for Perjury, and the other for conspiring with Daniel Hicky, Daniel Carty, Donogh O Bryen, Andrews Junior and other Malefactors, Falsely and Fraudelently to cheat the Popish inhabitiants of Clare of the sum of 1202 l, 9 shill. sterling, to which is added An Appendix, being an Answer to a Libel Intituled Patrick Hurly's Vindication, with some remarkable Passages of His Life and Actions. DUBLIN, J. Whalley. 1701. 56 pages.

1944. Remarks on the Franciscans in Ennis, from the Earliest Period of the Order, to the Present Time, with Sermon by Rev. Sylvester Malone, M. R. I. A and P. P. Sixmilebridge. F. A. [Father Aug. Holohan] ENNIS, Clare Independent Office. 1877. 92 pages.

1955. The Prophet of the Ruined Abbey or a Glance of the Future of Ireland: a Narrative founded on the Ancient 'Prophecies of Culmkill' and on other predictions and popular traditions among the Irish by the author of 'The Cross and the Shamrock'. [Hugh Quigley]. DUBLIN, James Duffy. 1863. 247 pages. Hugh Quigley was born in County Clare.

1981. Politics and Irish Life 1913-1921. Provincial Experience of War and Revolution. David Fitzpatrick. DUBLIN, Gill and Macmillan. 1977. 394 pages. a superb study based primarily on activities in County Clare during these eventful years

2049. A Report of Trials under a Special Commission for County Clare held at Ennis in 1848. John Simpson Armstrong. DUBLIN, Hodges & Smith. 198 pages.

2055. Statistical Survey of the County of Clare with Observations on the Means of Improvement; Drawn Up for the Consideration and By Directors of the Dublin Society. Hely Dutton. DUBLIN, Graisberry & Campbell, Printers. 1808. 369 pages.

2060. Souvenir of the Centenary of the Convent of Mercy. St. Xavier's Ennis, County Clare. 1854-1954. 94 pages

2074. The Emerald Isle Album. Limerick and Clare. 54 Platinatone Views from Photographs by William Lawrence. DUBLIN, The Emerald Isle Album Co. circa 1900.

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Researching Carberry in 1850s/60s Montreal only


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 02, 2007 7:38 am 
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Sharon,

Thank you for this extensive selection of Clare literature.

A check of the Library Prism catalogue (go to http://www.clarelibrary.ie/index.htm and click on Catalogue) shows that several - or possibly most - of these books are indeed in the Library's possession so locally resident library members might like to take this opportunity to graze your list.

Paddy


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 Post subject: Celtic Bookshop
PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 8:55 pm 
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Sharon
Thanks for your recommendation. We are going to the bookshop tomorrow.
Doug Burnett
Satellite Beach FL
Presently in Limerick Ireland

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