Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

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smcarberry
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Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by smcarberry » Fri Dec 01, 2023 2:57 pm

On Nov. 29th, Sheila posted as much as she had on hand, in timeline fashion, to reflect on matters revolving around the Tulla institutional approach to later-years distress during what we view as the Great Famine. She noted a need for additional info:
Thur 5 Dec 1850: page 3: Tulla Union. Appointment of Margaret Collins as teacher

There is a gap of several years here.

Mon 10 Jul 1865: Tulla Union. Male and Female Convalescent Fever Wards
WIth my regrets for not having better attributions for material saved in my efiles, here are contents of screenshots taken many years ago, for my own use, not intended for posting anywhere, but showing matters as of April 1851 and Oct 1851:
Tulla Union. Copy letter [a copy of a letter] from the Board of Guardians to the Commissioners dated; Tulla, 25th April 1851.

I am directed by the chairman of the above union to inform you, that he has settled with Mr. Enright (agent to Captain O’Callaghan, whom he met on the land) as to a site for the new workhouse, instead of the one originally fixed on; Mr. Enright requires 6 s. per Irish acre more for the land now fixed on and at the same number of years’ purchase on the entire price as agreed upon for the other site. At the same time Mr. Enright stated that his consent must be subject to the approval of Mr. McGrath and he doubted not but that if they both agreed, immediate possession would be given, as the land is in the possession of Captain O’Callaghan. The chairman recommends an immediate communication be made to Mr. McGrath, through Messrs. Gealc [sic] & Dwyer.

The site alluded to (should you have a map of the premises) is bounded on the south by the road from Tulla to Garuragh Cross; on the east by the road from the Cross to Garurugh House [end of my screenshot]
Screenshot made 2014, showing what appears to be a typewritten copy, without an attribution as to the transcriber, the bracketed info being added today by me
Oct 1851
Union of Tulla.
To the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty’s Treasury.
The Memorial of the Guardians of the Poor Law Union of Tulla, in the County of Clare: -
Showeth,
That the number of paupers supported at the expense of the union at the present time is only thirty less
than at the same period of last year, and that in the interval of time the equivalent number of young women have been sent to Australia under the orders of the Poor Law Commissioners.

That this union at present is subject to very heavy extra charges by reason of numbers of these paupers being located in the workhouses of Scariff and Ennis Unions, which extra charges will cease when the workhouse new building for the Tulla Union is completed.

That, after deductions which comprise gentlemen’s desmesnes and a few large farms, the average rated value of each holding within this union does not exceed 7 l. [pound sign] 10 s.; that consequently these occupiers of are of a class disposed to carry their small capital and their labour to America; and that the pressure of heavy rates will tend very much to increase this disposition and consequently to augment the number of holdings which are at present altogether unproductive. [end of my screenshot]
Screenshot made 2011, labeled for my use as being in the Tulla PLU minutes book of Oct 1851, showing what appears to be the original 1851 typeface

Jimbo
Posts: 597
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:43 am

Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Jimbo » Fri Dec 01, 2023 9:52 pm

Hi Sharon,

Thanks for sharing your brief notes on the Tulla workhouse. Was surprised that the new location for the custom-built workhouse was not settled until as late as April 1851.

Hi Sheila,

Thanks for the various news clippings, especially the 1856 mention of a "new fever hospital" at the Tulla workhouse.

The minute books of Tulla poor law union did not survive and only one book from Scariff Union exists, so the newspaper articles are a critical source of information. However, given the terrible situation at the Scariff union workhouses, it was difficult for the small fever hospital located in Tulla to ever make the newspapers.
SCARIFF UNION
We give the following extract from a letter received from Scariff dated 9th January:—

"There are at this moment 1,655 paupers receiving in-door relief, and three thousand receiving out-door relief. The greatest anxiety prevails amongst the farmers to pay the 7 shilling 6 pence rate, whilst the landlords have done everything to retard its collection; the only landlords who have paid this rate are, James Molony, Esq., of Kiltanon, and Henry Spaight, Esq., agent to Mrs. Browne, of Newgrove. Rate amounts to £17,500, nearly £3,000 has been collected during the last fortnight, and not a single 6d paid by the landlords except by these two I have before mentioned. The apathy, and I may add, the obstruction given to the collection of the rates on every occasion by those gentlemen, while acting as ex-officio guardians, will I fear (of necessity) be the means of annihilating, and end in confiscation of, the entire property of this Union. The vice-guardians, with the co-operation and unceasing exertions of Capt. Hart, the Poor Law Inspector, have done everything that men could do to ameliorate the awful destitution prevailing in this Union, too much praise cannot be given to these gentlemen, whose exertions are unceasing."

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Monday, 10 January 1848
STATE OF THE WORKHOUSE—Much has been written and said about the workhouse here; but I believe the past week furnishes a case unparalleled. For the last four or five days the paupers had to be on turnips. No meal contractor is willing to supply food unless some security be given for the payment, and present guardians are not very anxious to put their own necks in the halter. All out door relief ceased during the past week. It would harrow the feelings of humanity to see hordes of miserable-looking objects coming into town from several miles round, expecting their usual quantum of meal, and returning home again wet and hungry, with a promise of getting it next day—and the next day brought with it no relief. . . .

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Monday, 10 December 1849
SCARIFF UNION.—A strange scene occurred at Scariff work-house on yesterday, after the sale ended, which we advertised in our last publication [issue not in archive]. When some of the articles purchased were placed on cars for removal, the paupers rushed out to prevent them being taken away, armed with all kinds of weapons. One young gentleman, brother-in-law of one of the plaintiffs, was struck with a stick on the head by one of the paupers, and had it not been for the timely arrival of Head Constable Taylor and a few men under his command, there is no telling what the consequences might be.

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Thursday, 3 January 1850
COURT OF QUEEN'S BENCH—Monday.
Thomas Usborne v. the Guardians of the Scariff Union.


Mr. Napier, Q.C., applied for the conditional order for a mandamus to compel the Guardians of the Scariff Union to strike a rate for the purpose of paying off a debt due to the plaintiff, a contractor. Counsel moved on the affidavit of Mr. Usborne, who stated that between May, 1848, and January, 1849, he entered into contracts with the defendants for supplying them with Indian corn for the use of the poor, and that on foot of those contracts, which were approved of by the Commissioners, he supplied corn to the value of £4,464 13s 9d. It appeared that £1,200 had been paid to him on account, leaving a balance of £3,265 13s 9d due by the Guardians, to whom he frequently applied for payment. After several ineffectual applications, he instituted proceedings against them in July, 1849, when there being no defence upon their part, judgment was obtained upon a plea of confession with a stay of execution. Mr. Usborne stated that since then he made repeated applications to get payment, but without effect; and that there was nothing to be seized but the furniture of the workhouse which would be useless for any other than workhouse purposes, and which, even if it were sold, would not realise £100.

. . . [a very long discussion on whether the guardians have the right to make a rate for the discharging of their debts; and if not, did they have the right to enter into a contract; the issue wasn't settled that day] . . .

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Thursday, 17 January 1850

The history "The Great Calamity: The Irish Famine 1845-1852" by Christine Kinealy (1995) provides a few paragraphs on the debt situation at Scariff Union:
The financial problems of the poorest unions deteriorated noticeably in the months following the 1849 harvest. When the elected guardians of the Scariff union resumed office in November 1849, the union was £11,996 6s 6d in debt and had no funds in hand. The guardians estimated that even if the full rate was collected, they still would not have sufficient funds to pay the everyday expenses of the union . . .

. . . At the beginning of February 1850, the meal contractor refused to provide any further supplies to the workhouse. The local sheriff also seized all of the provisions of the main workhouse in order to repay some of the debts of the guardians to the meal contractor. . . .
Of Scariff Union's total debts at November 1849, a little over one-fourth would be owing to Thomas Usborne. He had entered into contracts to supply the Scariff workhouses in May 1848 and January 1849, but not clear when he stopped supplying the workhouse (typical contracts were 3 or 6 months). There were likely many creditors of the Scariff Union, and from Usborne's comment about the lack of workhouse assets (only furniture worth £100), it was likely a more desperate creditor who obtained a court order allowing the possession on 2 January 1850 of the workhouse furniture. Usborne, with his high-priced lawyers, followed a more complex legal route to try to force the guardians to increase rates as to discharge their debts.

An Usborne descendant has an interesting family history website for his ancestors, including Thomas Usborne (1811-1883), a wealthy corn merchant with warehouses in Cork, Limerick and Tralee. It briefly mentions his role in exporting the Irish grain harvest during the Great Famine:
https://www.usbornefamilytree.com/thomas1811.htm

In this environment of near collapse of the workhouses of Scariff Union, the 25 or 50-bed Tulla Fever Hospital would rarely make the Irish newspapers. But enough so to piece together a brief history and timeline::

Garruragh Fever Hospital: Unknown Location with Canvas Tents:

Late 1848: start of operations? given only 93 admissions through 11 April 1849, seven of whom were from the week ending April 11th, the fever hospital likely started operations in late 1848 or early 1849.

1849, January: one of three fever hospitals budgeted for by Scariff Union.

1849, March: cholera outbreak patients taken to Tulla fever hospital, spread disease to fever patients.

1849, April 11th: 26 patients at Tulla Fever Hospital. History to date: 93 admissions, 46 deaths, 21 discharges. 49.5% death rate.

1849, November 8th: Dr. Molony of Tulla Fever Hospital provides explanation to Central Board of Health as to cause of the high number of deaths (cholera and poor construction of hospital).

Garruragh House Location (Plot 13 at GV):

1850, early: appears to have started operations at Garruragh House location at same time as Tulla Temporary Workhouse (women only)

Inception through August 1850: Tulla Fever Hospital had 504 patient admissions, with 126 deaths, 25% death rate, as reported to Central Board of Health.

1851 census: "Tulla Hospital", and "Tulla Workhouse", reported separately from Garruragh townland. "Tulla Hospital" (the fever hospital) had a population of 52 individuals, 15 males and 37 females. The 1861 census had zero reported at the "Tulla Hospital"; the 1851 totals continued to be reported separately as comparison. However, by the 1871 census, in the table summary by townland, both the "Tulla Hospital" count of 52 in 1851, plus the "Tulla Workhouse" count of 596 in 1851, were added to Garruragh townland comparative 1851 population (now 953, previously only 305 in 1851 and 1861). Thus, proof that the Tulla fever hospital, at least in March 1851, was located in Garruragh.

1852 through 1857: after the custom-built Tulla Workhouse was built in Garruragh (plot 14) in 1852, the Tulla Fever Hospital continued to operate separately at the Garruragh House location (plot 13), along with "auxiliary" operations for the new workhouse.

1855, September, Griffith Valuation: Plot 13; tenants were Poor Law Guardians of the Tulla Union, and reported as "Auxiliary Workhouse, offices, yard, and land". Plot 14, same tenant, was the "Workhouse, offices, & land".

1855, November: Garruragh House location sublet by Tulla Union for two years. Tulla Fever Hospital moves to Tulla Workhouse location (Plot 14). Auxiliary workhouse also closed.

1856, May: Tulla Union: Tenders for Rough Dashing the New Fever Hospital at the Workhouse.

Not much of a history for the Tulla Fever Hospital. The location and timing of its initial operations prior to Garruragh House are still unknown. For an excellent history of a fever hospital, the Tipperary Historical Journal in its 1997 issue has a 15-page study "The Great Famine and Fethard Temporary Fever Hospital" by Laurence M. Geary:

https://tipperarystudies.ie/wp-content/ ... spital.pdf

https://tipperarystudies.ie/historical-journal-index/

It gives a good introduction to the creation of the fever hospitals in Ireland, and at Fethard the controversies over the appointment of the medical doctor (whose salary was paid by the government), funding of the other hospital costs by the ratepayers, and direct opposition by the parish priest.

For source material the author relied upon the minute books of the Cashel poor law union, which, as mentioned above, unfortunately do not exist for Tulla and only one book survives for Scariff.

https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/archi ... unions.htm

Another source was the "Fethard fever hospital file" in the records at the National Archives, where hopefully a similar file might exist for the Tulla fever hospital.

Jimbo
Posts: 597
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:43 am

Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Jimbo » Sun Dec 03, 2023 7:45 am

I was interested to see, in the 1888-1913 map, that the Workhouse burial ground is in the townland of Drummaghmartin (adjacent to Garruragh). Griffith's Valuation shows only one tenant in Drummaghmartin: Anne Molony leasing from Dorothea Tottenham. Burial grounds are usually listed as exempt from rates, but not in this case.
Sheila, thank you for your above research from November 11th. I rediscovered this posting after stating that the location of the burial ground for both the Tulla fever hospital and Tulla workhouse was a mystery, when you had solved it days before!

Anne Molony at Drummaghmartin townland is leasing 150 acres with a herd's house from Dorothea Tottenham, which I am certain she has subleased out to a herdsman, a third party. Anne Canny Molony (1821 - 1861) was the widow of John Patrick Molony (1812-1851) of Cragg townland, wealthy landlords.

https://landedestates.ie/family/2045

Sheila, the primary Tulla Workhouse was not built until 1852. Don't you think there is no graveyard noted on Griffith Valuation of 1855, simply because it had not yet been built? I found a reference to the Drummaghmartin burial ground in the Clare Journal from 1870:
TULLA UNION.

The Board of Guardians will, on the 9th proximo, consider Tenders for Making a Clay Fence round the Drummaghmartin Burial Ground, in accordance with Specification to be seen at my Office.
Tenders must be sent through the Post Office.
(By Order),
T. MURPHY, Clerk of Union,
Poor Law Office,
Tulla, 27th July, 1870

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Monday, 8 August 1870
The Burial Ground (Ireland) Act of 1856 required that graveyards and cemeteries be fenced, and put this responsibility upon the Board of Guardians. A fence around the burial ground for the Tulla workhouse was likely a very low priority, and its timing in 1870 provides us no clue as to when the Drummaghmartin burial ground started operations, which was more likely in the late 1850's.

Building a wall around the graveyard at Quin Abbey appears to have been a higher priority. And from a few photos on-line the wall built around Quin Abbey graveyard was made of stone, and not a "clay fence" as built around the Drummaghmartin burial ground.
TULLA UNION.
The Board of Guardians will, on Tuesday, the 5th proximo, receive proposals for
BUILDING A WALL, &c.
Around the Grave-yard of Quin Abbey,
Under the provisions of the Burial Grounds Act, in accordance with a specification, which can be seen here.
By order,
T. MURPHY,
Clerk of Union.

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Monday, 28 August 1865
The clerk of Tulla Union was Timothy Murphy, who, I've discovered, enjoyed hunting on Sundays with sporting dogs.

Sheila, could you please provide a link to the 1888-1913 map which you referenced having found the workhouse graveyard noted on the map? I am fairly certain that I found it on google maps, their satellite view, but I would like to confirm with the 1888-1913 map.

Drummaghmartin townland is just northwest of Garruragh townland, and intersects the main road going north east from Tulla town to Cragroe at one single point. There a small road, a short distance later, takes you, I reckon, to the Drummaghmartin burial ground used by the Tulla Workhouse. See beige outline of Drummaghmartin on below google map. The "clay fence" built in 1870 appears to have held up surprisingly well, but now covered in green shrubbery. It continues to create a boundary around the perfectly rectangle shaped enclosure which does not appear on the map accompanying Griffith Valuation report (of unknown date). Surely, it must, I reckon, be the Drummaghmartin burial ground used by the Tulla Workhouse. I wonder how many people, or "paupers" as they were called, are buried there? Is there any memorial to those who died at the Tulla workhouse?


Edit 1 on 9 Dec 2023: Deleted map. It was not ever the burial ground for the Tulla Workhouse. See discussion on subsequent postings.
Last edited by Jimbo on Sat Dec 09, 2023 10:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

Sduddy
Posts: 1834
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Sduddy » Sun Dec 03, 2023 10:15 am

Hi Sharon and Jimbo

Thank you both for interesting material and helping to make famine times in the Tulla area a bit clearer.

Sharon, thank you for helping to fill the gap I’d left in my notes. The letter from the Board of Guardians to the [Poor Law] Commissioners was written after the site of the new workhouse had already been decided. This “Correspondence in Reference to the New Workhouse Constructing At Tulla”, https://archive.org/details/op1247491-1001/mode/2up, shows that the guardians had a change of mind as to the location of the new workhouse, or maybe the new guardians had their own ideas (and loyalties). They wanted the new workhouse to be located close to Garruragh House and they seem to have convinced themselves that this was a done deal, but the Commissioners were having none of it and replied twice that the location had already been decided.

The second letter, mentioning that the rate payers the Guardians depended on “are of a class disposed to bring to carry their small capital and labour to America”, echos the remark made by Elizabeth Smith, “Markets dull, people ruined; the better sort emigrating with money, leaving the Paupers of all classes at home to starve together”

Jimbo, thank you for two posts.
The Scarriff Workhouse was indeed a disaster. Gerard Madden’s book, The Annals of the Poor (East Clare Heritage, 2017), tells the whole story very well.
Jimbo, you gave a link to “The Great Famine and Fethard Temporary Fever Hospital”, by Laurence M. Geary, and I read it with interest. The role of the clergy was interesting. The rules governing the composition of Boards of Guardians prohibited clergy being included *. This was a very sore point with many of the clergy, especially those who considered themselves leaders of their flock, who should be referred to on all matters concerning their sheep. The correspondence I mentioned in my reply to Sharon is mostly very dry, but you will notice, on page 6, that Rev. Mr. Quinlivan and his two nephews were brought to a meeting of the board (May 1851), where they “were to renounce all claims to the land, and to the possession of the ground selected for the site of the new workhouse, as far as lay in the occupation of the two nephews”. This manoeuvering was in connection with a proposed change of location for the new workhouse, which happened to be part of a field near Garruragh House (the one you identified as Plot 12, I think), and owned by Captain O’Callaghan: https://archive.org/details/op1247491-1 ... 5/mode/2up
* see "The Board of Guardians" on askaboutireland.ie: https://www.askaboutireland.ie/learning ... guardians/

You are right in saying that the burial ground at Drummaghmartin could not have been shown in the map that accompanies Griffith’s Valuation on askaboutireland.ie. Here is the link to the Ordnance map showing the graveyard – click on the “window” icon: https://webapps.geohive.ie/mapviewer/index.html. There are 12 maps/satellite images to choose from. Select the last one, “MapGenie 25 inch”. “Tulla Union Workhouse Burial Ground” is at the end of the small road that you mention, but it is on the right hand side of it – not the left. Switch to “MapGenie Imagery 2013” for a satellite view and you will see that it is partly covered in forestry now. The map that shows “Garruragh Castle”, in the location usually marked “Garruragh House”, is the second last map “MapGenie 6 inch Last Edition Black”. That map also shows the Workhouse graveyard.

Sheila

Jimbo
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Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:43 am

Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Jimbo » Mon Dec 04, 2023 6:10 am

Hi Sheila,

Thanks very much for highlighting that the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan and his two nephews were brought to a board meeting of Tulla Union in May 1851. Have you any idea who this Rev. Quinlivan might be? Paddy Waldron in a posting back in 2012 was researching a Quinlivan from Rathlooby, with an earliest document dated `18 June 1793' and with a reference to "James Quinlivan, son of Lanc. Quinlivan of Rathloobain, Co Clare". A separate document was the 1825 Freeholders list for Tulla Barony for:
Laurence Quinlivan, Abode - Rath, freehold- Rath, Landlord - Mrs. Comyn, Lives on lease - Edmond, John and James Quinlivan

Is Rath the same place as Rathluby? If so, why is it listed under Tulla and not under Bunratty Upper?
Mrs. Comyn was the widow, Martha Harrison Comyn, of Garruragh House. "Rath", as we've recently discussed, was a locality in Garruragh townland in Tulla Parish as reported in the 1827 Tithe Applotments, and not Rathluby townland. A James Quinlivan and Thomas Quinlivan are reported in 1827 in Rath (Garruragh):
https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/cocla ... la_tab.htm

At Griffith Valuation for Garruragh townland, the Plot 15 tenant was "James Quinlivan (Larry)" and Plot 17 was held by "James Quinlivan (Tom)".
https://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith ... gh%3C/b%3E

In the Tulla baptism registers, James Quinlivan and Mary McNamara, with residences reported as both Rath and Garruragh, had eight children born between 1845 and 1862, with their first born son named Laurence in 1847. This Quinlivan family of Rath in Garruragh townland had children in all three Tulla baptism registers, which is unique but unlikely to be singularly unique. The fact that the two Quinlivan nephews in Garruragh had an uncle Rev. Quinlivan increases the likelihood that this family was somehow related to Laurence Quinlivan of Ballyroughan who Paddy mentions had at least three Catholic priests in their immediate family.

The "Quinlivan of Ballyroughan" thread (summarized these findings and posted link back here):

http://www.ourlibrary.ca/phpbb2/viewtop ... f=1&t=3873

Thanks also for providing the link to the GeoHive Map Viewer. It took awhile to get used to and I recommend viewing on a computer rather than a cell phone, but I finally was able to find the "Tulla Union Workhouse Burial Ground" on the 25 Inch Map. This put a quick squash to my theory on its location (will delete the google map attachment to save space later). The "clay fence" built in 1870, or at least advertised to be built in 1870, was likely the cheapest option available to meet the legal requirement, and not built to last.

After finding the workhouse burial ground on the "Map 25 Inch", in switching to the modern 2013 map, I believe the forestry section was all in Garruragh townland, in the mysterious Plot 26 on the map accompanying Griffith Valuation, that does not appear on the GV report. The landscape of the fields in 2013 had completely changed from the earlier maps of 1996 or even 2006. Just west of the forested Garruragh (plot 26 in GV map) appears to have been scrub land which had not seen a plow in decades with some type of perimeter fence or wall visible on the map. Then west of that was tilled land. Portions of both the scrub and tilled land would have made up the "Tulla Union Workhouse Burial Ground" area reported on the "1888-1913 map". By 2013, the "scrub" land and any perimeter wall had completely disappeared creating one large and fertile looking field.

I see here how you determined that the "Map 25 Inch" was for the period 1888-1913.

https://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?i ... d38d579def

Perhaps when later editions of the Clare Journal become available at the British Newspaper Archive there will be an explanation as to when the Tulla Union Workhouse burial ground was no longer in use and removed from the responsibility of Tulla Union (later back to Scariff Union). Or else when the "full handwritten revision books eventually become available on-line", as mentioned in the news article by John Grenham, it will become clear what happened to the Tulla Workhouse Burial Ground.

At a meeting of the Tulla Union Board of Guardians in June 1854, there is a mention of "the taking of a piece of land for the purpose of a burial ground". But this was one of several topics considered of "an unimportant character" and no discussion was provided in the newspaper account. The main discussion was the replacement of the Tulla workhouse master, self-proclaimed as an "ill-treated servant", who had been dismissed, as by his own admission, for "severity" "towards the boys". There was a very large number of applicants for the workhouse master position, and the below article provides a mini-directory of union workhouse masters and other employees:
TULLA.
BOARD OF GUARDIANS—TUESDAY
H. SPAIGHT, Esq., (in the Chair.)


Other Guardians:—Messrs. J. Blood, J. Singleton, T. Spaight, H. Gore, Maurice O'Connell, Captain O'Callaghan, J. Robb, William Watson, H. Bingham, John Molony, Dennis Slattery, Peter Tierney, Michael Murphy, William Butler, Nicholas Butler, D. O'Connell, John Bingham, T. Corbett, Pat Corbett, R.P. Walton, and Blood.
W.H. Lucas, P.L.I., was in attendance.

STATE OF THE HOUSE.—Remaining 634; Admitted 21—636; Discharged 97; Died 2—636, 656. [these number do not reconcile, there must be a typo] . . .

THE LETTERS from the Commissioners were of an unimportant character, on referring to the taking of a piece of land for the purpose of a burial ground. Another transmitting forms for the particulars of the emigration of a pauper. A third revoking the cholera order of the 13th of April, last.

THE APPOINTMENT OF A MASTER.—The Board proceeded to consider the numerous applications for the situations of master and matron.

Mr. Lucas, P.L.I., hoped they would appoint some person properly qualified, and experienced in workhouse management. He also alluded to the argument pro and con on appointing man and wife.

After a few remarks the applications were opened and the persons called into the room serialim. They were Mr. J.L. O'Conner, the present master of Listowel Workhouse; Mr. and Mrs. Boland, the porter and hospital nurse of Scariff; Mr. Daniel Costelloe, the schoolmaster of Croon Union, (rejected at once as too young); Mr. Edmond Reynolds, the schoolmaster of Nenagh Union, (rejected for like reason) Mr. Martin Hood, late master of Loughrea Workhouse for 4 years; Mr. D. Haynes, master of Boherbuoy Auxiliary Workhouse, Limerick; Mr. J. Garrahy and wife, from Ballinrobe Workhouse, (these did not appear, Mr. Lucas speaking to their efficiency); Mrs. E. O'Brien, matron of Boherbuoy Auxiliary, Limerick; Mrs. Martin, schoolmistress from Nenagh Union; Miss M.A. Glynn, late assistant matron and schoolmistress of Limerick Union Miss Shiel, embroidery teacher from Nenagh; Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy, the present master of Killadysert Union, and his wife:: Mr. J. Wall, Anagh; Mr. and Mrs. Foley, the present master of Corrofin and his wife; Mr. J. Bohen, from Newcastle Union; Mr. J. Skeahan, from Ennis; Mrs. Crowe, the present matron; Miss Ann Sproule, the nurse at Garruha [Garruragh]; Mr. J. Crowe, the present master; and Miss M. Shaw. Altogether there were 21 applicants for both offices.

Mr. Crowe, the late master's application ran as follows; we give it, as it is in some measure explanatory of the reasons which led to his dismissal:—
Workhouse, Tulla, 6th June, 1854.

GENTLEMEN— I offer myself to master of your workhouse; the regularity and cleanliness of the house, the improved condition of the land, the accuracy of my accounts, your own reports on the "visiting committee book," the general character of the establishment, &c, &c, all speak volumes in support of my management, the only fault found with me was my "severity" "towards the boys," and the circumstance of your having been compelled to remove the schoolmaster, with many other occurrences that transpired since, prove that I have not been entirely to blame.

I beg that you will discuss my merits and demerits fairly and impartially, (I will abide the decision,) and if you think you can do better for the Union I yield my claim; at the same time be assured that your interests were always uppermost in my thought, and I have been for nearly three years. Gentlemen,
Your faithful,
Yet ill-treated servant,
JOHN W. CROWE.

The Board of Guardians,
Tulla Union.
After some few remarks as to the propriety of electing a person who was experienced in workhouse management.: . . . The second poll resulted as follows:—for Skeahan, 14, for O'Conner, 6; one not voting.

THE MATRON—Mr. Singleton proposed Mrs. Crowe, the present matron in a few words, in which he spoke in high terms of her care and efficiency. Mr. M. O'Connell, concurred in what had fallen from Mr. Singleton and seconded the nomination. Mr. T. Spaight proposed and Mr. Slattery seconded Mrs. O'Brien.

Mr. Crowe stating that if his wife was re-elected he would not go near the house at all, and she only asked for 3 children to remain with her, she was at once re-elected. Some of the Guardian thinking that she ought to have all her children with her, there appeared on a poll being taken 14 voted for three; and 5 for all her children being left with her.

PORTER.—Mathew O'Dea, a pensioner, was elected porter. There were two other applicants.

Two Relieving Officers were appointed to take stock from the present, and deliver it up to the future master.

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Thursday, 8 June 1854
John Crowe in his letter to the Board of Guardians stated that he had worked for Tulla Union for "nearly three years", so had been hired after June 1851, when the custom-built Tulla Workhouse (Plot 14) had not yet started operations. John Crowe most likely started at the Tulla workhouse in early 1852 and had been there two and a half years when he got dismissed. John and Eliza Crowe had previously worked as master and matron of the Turnpike Auxiliary Workhouse in Ennis between September 1850 and their (likely) 1852 start at the Tulla Union Workhouse.
ENNIS UNION.

Tenders were received for the situations of master and matron to the Turnpike Auxiliary Workhouse, (formerly fever hospital), from John and Eliza Crowe, and William and Sydney Fitzgerald.

Mr. John Crowe and wife were elected by a majority of 9 to 3.

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Thursday, 12 September 1850
In the Drumcliff baptism register (1841-1879), John Crowe and Eliza Doherty were the parents of three daughters (Susan, Catherine, Eliza) baptized between 1847 and 1851, two with the reported residence of Turnpike. In the Tulla baptism register (1846-1861), John Crowe and Eliza Doherty had one daughter (Ellen) baptized in May 1854, with no residence reported — this was just one month before John Crowe was dismissed as master of the Tulla Union workhouse.

Sheila, in looking at the baptism sponsors for the Crowe children between 1847 and 1854, John Crowe's wife, Eliza Doherty, was very likely the sister of Catherine Doherty, married to William Rickards of Mill Street, Ennis. There is a Rickard sponsor at three of the four Crowe baptisms. Back in 2020 we discussed this family at length in your thread "Michael G. Considine and Daniel O'Connell". Susan Rickards and her sister, Eliza Rickards, both married Considines, one a victualler and the other a cattle dealer, who, as you may recall, I tried to convince you were brothers:

http://www.ourlibrary.ca/phpbb2/viewtop ... 1&start=75

Sduddy
Posts: 1834
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Sduddy » Mon Dec 04, 2023 11:11 am

Hi Jimbo,

Good work on the Quinlivans of Rath in Garrura. There are Quinlivans in the townland of Ballyroughan, Quin parish. That townland is adjacent* to the townland of Rathluby, but those Quinlivans, as you say, are probably relatives of the Quinlivans in Garrura. A Michael Quinlivan lived in Ballyroughan, who produced a son, Michael, who became a priest, and who is the subject of a posting by Sharon Carberry: “Fr. Michael Quilivan, Kilkee PP, E. Clare-born, 1894 obit”: http://www.ourlibrary.ca/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=273. That Rev. Michael Quinlivan was only 79 when he died in 1894, so I don’t think he was old enough to have two nephews leasing land in Garrura in 1851. With siblings so often born 20 years apart, it is possible, of course, but I think it is more likely that Rev Mr. Quinlivan who attended the Board meeting in 1851 was an older man, whose first name we don’t know. Does the history of the Diocese show a Quinlivan who might fit?
* Rathluby is a townland in the parish of Quin (number 46 in the map of townlands and adjacent to no. 10, the townland of Ballyroughan: https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/cocla ... nlands.htm

Here are some records for the Fr Michael Quinlivan of Ballyroughan:
Calendar of Wills, 1877: Letters of Administration of the personal estate of Michael Quinlivan late of Ballyroughan County Clare Gentleman deceased who died 9 May 1862 at same place were granted at the Principal Registry to Michael Quinlivan of Clondegad County Clare P.P. the Son of said deceased: http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchiv ... _00329.pdf

He is also mentioned in the Dunboyne Newscuttings:
Dunboyne Newscuttings: https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/libra ... s_1855.htm

26 Dec 1894, Kilkee: Death of Michael Quinlivan, aged 79, Roman Catholic Clergyman; informant: John Waters, present at death, Kilkee: https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 686613.pdf

Jimbo, I looked through a whole lot of civil records (Tulla Union) to see if any Quinlivan still used “Rath” as their address, but found none. I did find the record of the death of James Quinlivan in 1879, aged 73, address: Garrura. He was born about 1806. Is he a brother of Rev Mr. Quinlivan, or one of the nephews?: https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 869685.pdf (the informant, Matthew Keane, was the son-in-law of James).

Jimbo, I've replied to only one part of your post, but the other parts were interesting too, and I may get back to them later.

Sheila

Sduddy
Posts: 1834
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Sduddy » Tue Dec 05, 2023 10:28 am

Hi Jimbo,

Back again and continuing with the Quinlivans for a moment. This record, dated March 1822, of the marriage of a Quinlivan girl (no first name), from Garura, to Tim Linane, from Clouney, gives the witnesses as Lau. Quinlivan, Garrura, Thomas Quinlivan, Garrura, Bridget Kerwick, Tulla: https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 4/mode/1up.
I think that Laurence, Thomas and the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan belonged to one generation, and that the two Jameses listed in Griffiths are the next generation. Just speculation, of course.
On 6 Feb 1839, a Bridget Quinlivan (no address) married Carrol Daly of Rath; witnesses: James Daly, Thos Quinlivan (mistranscribed by me as Lisinhoon!): https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 2/mode/1up

Griffith’s Valuation: Jas. Quinlivan (Tom) leasing Lots 17 and 18 jointly with Carrol Daly.

Trove, The Argus (Melbourne) Wed 6 May 1874: Marriages: Daly – Quinlivan – on teh 4th inst., at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, by the Rev. Father O’Sullivan, Thomas Joseph Daly, youngest son of the late Mr. Carrol Daly, Tulla, to Honora, fourth daughter of Mr. James Laurence Quinlivan, Gaura, Tulla, Count Clare, Ireland: https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5869435

So is this Honora Quinlivan the daughter of the other James Quinlivan?
On 10 Feb 1880, Honora Quinlivan, teacher, daughter of James Quinlivan, married John Daly, Tulla, Farmer, son of Carol Daly, deceased; witnesses: Michael Quinlivan, Mary Cleary: https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 033361.pdf. According to the parish record of the marriage, Honora and John were first cousins: https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 6/mode/1up

And are these two marriages further evidence of two James Quinlivans?

29 Apr 1890: Marriage of Michael Quinlivan, Garrura, Farmer, son of James Quinlivan, Farmer, to Mary Shalloo, Knockatoo, daughter of Michael Shalloo, Farmer, in O’Callaghan’s Mills chapel; witnesses: Michael Quinlivan, Nora Hogan: https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 904690.pdf

4 Feb 1891: Marriage of Michael Quinlivan, Garruragh, Farmer, son of James Quinlivan, Farmer, to Kate Connellan, Garruragh, daughter of Michael Connellan, Farmer, in Tulla chapel; witnesses: Daniel Hussey, Ellen Reidy: https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 885142.pdf

There seems to have been quite a bit of competition for the position of School Master in the Workhouse. Thank you for those interesting newspaper reports. The children over age 3 in the workhouses were separated from their parents (who were also separated, of course). It’s sad to think they treated with such severity and had nobody to go to. Michael Davitt said that, when his parents were evicted from their house in Straide, they travelled to the workhouse in Swinford, but found they could not bear to be separated from the children and so emigrated – a short piece about Swinford Workhouse here: https://www.mayo-ireland.ie/en/towns-vi ... house.html.

Jimbo, of course I remember the Rickard sisters, Susan and Eliza. Since that time I found another sister, Ellen. Her death was reported in the Clare Journal on Mon 8 Jul. 1861: On Saturday last, in Mill-street, Ellen, daughter of Mr. Wm. Rickards, aged 14, sincerely and deservedly regretted by all who had the pleasure of her acquaintance. Your family tree shows that another child, born 1863, was then called Ellen, but you found no further records for her.

Sheila

Sduddy
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Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Sduddy » Wed Dec 06, 2023 10:14 am

Well, I can’t be sure that Matthew Keane was the son-in-law of the James Quinlivan who died in 1879. I see now that the other James Quinlivan died on 15 Jun 1883, aged 71, and the informant is Matthew Keane again: https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 821847.pdf. Matthew had married Anne Quinlivan, the daughter of one of the Jameses, in 1874: 17 Feb 1874: Marriage of Matthew Keane, Grocer, Tulla, son of John Keane, Labourer, to Anne Quinlivan, Garrura, daughter of James Quinlivan, Farmer, in Tulla chapel; witnesses: Michael Halpin, Honora Quinlivan: https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 117942.pdf

Of course, on looking at the Tulla parish baptisms, I found yet another mistranscription: Honora Quinlivan baptised on 27 Oct 1853 was the daughter of James Quinlivan and Mary Carroll – not John Quinlivan and Mary Carroll: https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 3/mode/1up

I am thinking that the Rev Mr. Quinlivan was not living in Co. Clare and had come from elsewhere. I think he would have been sponsor for at least one of the Quinlivan children if he was living in Co. Clare.

Sheila

P.S. Going back to the four McNamara families who disappeared from Garruragh: I sent to G.R.O. for the record of the death of Daniel McNamara in 1864. I knew that there were a lot of Daniel McNamaras in Tulla Union and that the chances of this Daniel being the man who was married to Mary Digaden were slim, but went ahead anyway. I got the death record today and it’s not for that Daniel. But rather than waste it, I am giving it here: 16 Dec. 1864, Newgrove: Death of Daniel McNamara, married, aged 67, Herdsman; informant: Patt McNamara, present at death, Newgrove. He might be the father of Pat McNamara who was a coachman.

Sduddy
Posts: 1834
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Sduddy » Thu Dec 07, 2023 10:08 am

Hi Jimbo

Today I will send for the death record for the Thomas McNamara who died in 1869, aged 58. If that age is correct, Thomas was born in 1811 and aged only 17 when Mary McNamara was baptised on 14 Dec 1828, but it’s quite possible that his age at death was underestimated. There are only three other deaths of Thomas McNamaras registered in Tulla Union 1864-1870. One is for an infant and the other two I had already sent for in 2019 – see below. Those two would have been too young anyway to be parent of Mary McNamara baptised 14 Dec. 1828. In 2019 this thread was still young and I’d sent for them in the hopes of eliminating a couple of the Thomas McNamaras from your list of likely candidates for the missing Thomas, the Civil War soldier. My hopes were dashed.

Reply by me on 27 May 2019 – page 20 of this thread:
By the way, I sent for the records of the deaths of two Thomas McNamaras, which were registered in Tulla in 1867. One Thomas was aged 45 and the other was aged 48 and so they were born about the time that some of the Thomas McNamaras in your chart on page 1 were born.
I received both records a couple of weeks ago. The Thomas aged 45 died of fever in Tulla Workhouse on 06.08.1867. He was a Labourer and was married, but his home address is not given – it could be anywhere in the Tulla Union, a very large area. The Thomas aged 48 died in Derryfadda on 11.05.1867 (so born about 1819). He was a farmer and a widower. The Informant is Michael McNamara, Derryfadda. It’s possible this Thomas is the father of Patrick McNamara in Derryfadda. Patrick died on 09.02.1916, aged 73. If this age is correct he was born about 1843. Looking at the Caher-Feakle baptisms, I can find no Patrick born to a Thomas about that time. There are no McNamaras leasing land in Derryfadda at the time of Griffith’s Valuation. It may be that Thomas moved to Derryfadda at a later date.
Sheila

Jimbo
Posts: 597
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:43 am

Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Jimbo » Thu Dec 07, 2023 10:32 am

Hi Sheila,

Thank you for obtaining the 1864 civil death record for Daniel McNamara who ended up being from Newgrove, father of a Patrick McNamara. And I wouldn't worry about any mistranscriptions of the Tulla records. I had previously caught that "John Quinlivan" was "James Quinlivan", it was fairly obvious, and expect other users would also. And for their own family tree, they would always want to go back to the original records to confirm the entries.

Regarding another one of your comments. When the Tulla Union Board of Guardians met in early June 1854, they were reviewing applicants for the position of the master and matron of the workhouse, and not the schoolmaster. Two applicants each for the workhouse master and matron roles had prior experience as schoolmaster and schoolmistress, perhaps this led to the confusion. The circumstances of why the schoolmaster was forced out of his position at the Tulla Workhouse are unknown. However, John Crowe as master of the workhouse held overall responsibility and appears to have been held accountable leading to his own dismissal. The Tulla Board of Guardians advertised separately for the schoolmaster role at the workhouse.
TULLA UNION.
Schoolmaster Wanted.
The Board of Guardians of the above Union will, on TUESDAY, the 13th of JUNE, instant, elect a properly qualified person as
Schoolmaster of the Workhouse
At a Salary of £20 per Annum with Rations and Apartments.
Persons trained in the Model School of the National Board of Education will have a preference.
Proposals, with testimonials as to character and competency, will be received by me up to 1 o'clock on the 13th of June, when the personal attendance of candidates is required.
P. SHANNON
Clerk of the Union
June 1st, 1854.

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Thursday, 1 June 1854
Sheila, with regards to the identity of the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan, he is definitely the Rev. Michael Quinlivan. I was hesitant to make a guess without fully researching. Not sure if you had another read of "Quinlivan of Ballyroughan" which I provided a link to, but the first sentence by Paddy states "the most frustrating family that I have ever tried to research in county Clare". And the last sentence by Margaret, prior to my recent posting, states "it is confusing and there are many members with similar names".

The "Rev. Mr. Quinlivan" frequently appears in the newspaper archives, and I quickly learned that he was a curate in Ennis. "Ennis Cathedral: The Building and Its People" by the Clare Roots Society gives a good history, and names all the parish priest / administrators over the years, but not the curates. But eventually the newspaper accounts revealed the name of the Ennis curate as Michael Quinlivan.

https://www.ennisparish.com/wp-content/ ... istory.pdf

The Rev. Michael Quinlivan's travels to England to raise funds for the "unfinished Chapel of Ennis" was also not included in the parish history. And his obituary (from the posting of Sharon), like most Irish obituaries, was truly boring and more a listing of who attended his funeral. So am sharing the story of the Rev. Michael Quinlivan in England in 1850 as I found it interesting. He meets up with yet another Quinlivan cousin who was a Catholic priest in Cambridge, fundraises further in Dublin, and gets back to Clare in 1851, in time to attend the Tulla Union board of guardian meeting with his so called "nephews".
A debt of £800 is due of the new and unfinished Chapel of Ennis, and Bishop Kennedy has sent the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan to England, to solicit a voluntary rate in aid.

Limerick Chronicle of 24 July 1850.
IRELAND.
NEW CATHOLIC CHURCH AT ENNIS.


The Rev. Mr. Quinlivan, the pious and zealous Parish Priest [in fact, only a curate] of Ennis, county Clare, Ireland, is now in London, at the Chapel House, Bermondsey. He intends visiting Manchester, Bristol, Liverpool, and all the important towns of England, for the laudable purpose of collecting funds for the completion of a splendid Catholic Church now erecting in that impoverished town. Already £8,000 have been expended, being subscribed by a faithful people, borne down with Poor Rates, nearly equal to the nett annual value of their holdings. It was the patriotic people of Clare who laid the foundation stone of Catholic Emancipation. Their independent conduct, and the great sacrifices which they made at the memorable Clare election, entitle them to the gratitude of all Catholics, particularly of the nobility and gentry of England, for whom they opened the gates of the Constitution. For this they have ever since been persecuted, and are at length almost completely exterminated by their tyrant landlords. Thousands of them, have been obliged to take shelter in the town of Ennis, where little now remains for them but the consolations of their Holy Religion and its saintly ministers. On their behalf the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan appeals to the Catholic gentry and nobility of England. He comes under the sanction of the Right Rev. Dr. Kennedy, Bishop of the diocese; the Right Rev. Dr. Waring, Bishop of the Eastern District, and many others of the most exalted clergy of both countries. We sincerely wish him success, and hope he will be able to return to his native country, with the same sentiments of gratitude which have ever distinguished the noble inhabitants of Ireland when the cries of their distress have awakened the generosity of England.

Weekly Register and Catholic Standard, London, 26 October 1850
CAMBRIDGE.
Our good pastor, the Rev. Thomas Quinlivan, is away from Pumbridge for a short time seeking a little repose from his labours, leaving his "post" to be filled by the Rev. Michael Quinlivan, his cousin, a very amiable and eloquent Priest, just such a one to work many conversions in this land of heresy. I cannot attempt to describe to you the good effects produced by this three Sermons on Sunday the 8th inst., . . .

Weekly Register and Catholic Standard, London, Saturday, 21 September 1850
THE NEW CHURCH OF ENNIS.—The Rev. Mr. Quinlivan, the respected curate of Ennis, is at present on a mission in this city [Dublin], to collect funds to complete the New Church, which is already being erected, and which is so much needed in this town, for the accommodation of the people of an extensive parish. The reverend gentleman comes with peculiar claims from that locality—from the citadel of Catholic Emancipation, and from amongst a people generally reduced to poverty by oppressions which are known to the whole kingdom, and from which the houses of divine worship may almost be said to stand alone exempt. A people in such circumstances are manifestly in need of charitable assistance for so laudable an undertaking.—Nation. [Dublin newspaper]

Limerick and Clare Examiner, Wednesday, 22 January 1851
The Rev. Mr. Quinlivan who attended the May 1851 meeting at the Tulla Union Board of Guardians, along with "his nephews" was definitely the Rev. Michael Quinlivan (≈1815 - 1894).

Who were his "nephews"? Sheila, there were definitely two men named James Quinlivan living in Garruragh. This is both reflected in Griffith Valuation, "James Quinlivan (Larry)" in Plot 15, and "James Quinlivan (Tom)" in Plot 17 and Plot 18. Also, in the Tulla baptism register, there are two different couples living in Garruragh / Rath having children baptized: James Quinlivan and Mary McNamara; and James Quinlivan and Mary Caroll. At the same reported residence of Garruragh / Rath are also John Quinlivan and Mary Boland. Their neighbor in Plot 16 was a John Boland, who in the Tulla baptism register was married to Mary Quinlivan.

With the map that accompanies Griffith Valuation, it appears that the Tulla Workhouse (Plot 14) had taken the southern portion of Plot 17, held by "James Quinlivan (Tom)" which was reduced to only 17 acres. North of Plot 17 was Plot 15, held by "James Quinlivan (Larry)", 32 acres. The location of their houses in the two plots are shouting distance from each other. I reckon both James of Plot 15 and James of Plot 17 attended the May 1851 meeting with the Board of Guardians. The newspaper reported the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan as their "uncle", but this might not necessarily be true. Although prosperous farmers the Quinlivans of Garruragh would have wanted to have the Rev. Michael Quinlivan, of high social status and known to be very eloquent, to represent them. The Rev. Michael Quinlivan (≈1815 - 1894) could have been their first or second cousin, possibly once removed, but I reckon was unlikely to have been their "uncle".

The Rev. Michael Quinlivan (≈1815 - 1894) was actually younger and outlasted his two "nephews", James Quinlivan (≈1812 - 1883) of Garruragh Plot 17 and James Quinlivan (≈1806 - 1879) of Garruragh Plot 15. Sheila, it was very challenging determining which James Quinlivan died in 1879 versus 1883. Plus, they were both married to a "Mary", one two times, so it was challenging to determine which Mary died when. Plus, the names of their children were mostly in common. The key evidence was your discovery of the 1874 marriage announcement in an Australian newspaper which identified Honoria Quinlivan as the fourth daughter of James McNamara.

In the below family tree research, the later whereabouts of most of the Quinlivans are noted as "unknown", but mostly "unresearched". I did research more fully the Matthew Keane, mentioned in your last posting as married to Annie Quinlivan, since as a Coercion Suspect who later moves to Brooklyn, he was interesting. Their descendants, using only the civil records index available on ancestry, have Annie's parents as James Quinlivan and Catherine Connell of Lisofin, Tulla, and without the passenger listing are unaware that Annie Keane also immigrated to Brooklyn.

Sheila, we've struggled to determine why the population of Garruragh declined from 305 in the 1851 census to only 127 in 1861, a 58% decline. And a similar decline in the number of physical houses; which mostly occurred between 1851 and 1855. Researching further the Quinlivans of Garruragh has led to a likely explanation. The Garruraghians, I reckon, left Clare en masse for Victoria, Australia to participate in the Victorian Gold Rush which began in 1851.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victorian_gold_rush


********* Family of Thomas Quinlivan of Garruragh Townland, Tulla *********

Thomas Quinlivan of Rath, Garruragh townland, on the Tithe Applotments dated 11 February 1827 held 33 acres in total (10 acres of 1st quality, 10 acres of 2nd quality, and 13 acres of 3rd quality). Total tithe amount of £1 9s 11d. Same property details as next tenant, a John Hogan.

http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarc ... _00622.pdf

A Thomas Quinlivan and Laurence Quinlivan, both of Garrura, were witnesses at the marriage of a Miss Quinlivan (unknown first name) of Garrura to Tim Linane of Clouney in March 1822 (Tulla marriage register, 1819-1846). Bridget Quinlivan and Thady Linnane, of Maghera, baptized a son, Patrick Linnane, on 7 January 1823; sponsors Michael Linnane and E. Quinlivan (Quin-Clooney baptisms, 1816-1855). Later whereabouts unknown.

A Thomas Quinlivan was a witness at the marriage of Mary Quinlivan (likely Rath) to John Boland of Rath in February 1839.

Thomas Quinlivan appears to have died prior to 1855 Griffith Valuation, when Plot 17 of Garruragh townland was held by "Jas. Quinlivan (Tom)". The acreage of Plot 17 was only 17 acres which had been reduced with the building of the Tulla Workhouse (Plot 14) in 1852. James Quinlivan (Tom) also held land at Plot 18 (36 acres). Carroll Daly, the brother-in-law of James Quinlivan, also had a small house on the property at Plot 17b and shared Plot 18.

1.0 James Quinlivan (≈1812 - 1883)

Assumed to be the son of Thomas Quinlivan due to the 1855 Griffith Valuation report which distinguished between two tenants named James Quinlivan. The Plot 17 tenant was "Jas Quinlivan (Tom)", as in James Quinlivan, son of Thomas Quinlivan..

James Quinlivan was married to Mary Carroll as shown in the Tulla baptism records, but their marriage has not been found in any parish marriage register. Their first known child was baptized in 1845 in Tulla Parish. However, the Tulla marriage records have missing several pages in the early 1840's, so not clear who was their first born child. Entirely possible that James Quinlivan named his first born son, Thomas, after his assumed father.

There were two James Quinlivans in Garruragh, one died in 1879 and the other in 1883. The other James died in 1883 since he was still living in 1880 when his daughter, Honor, was married. Both James Quinlivans had a daughter named Honor, but the Honor who married in 1874 in Australia was reported to be the "fourth daughter of James Quinlivan".

James Quinlivan, of Garuragh, married, 71 years old, died on 15 June 1883; informant Matthew Keane of Tulla. Matthew Keane of Tulla, was the informant on the death record for both James Quinlivans; he was the son-in-law of the other James Quinlivan married to Mary McNamara.

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 821847.pdf

Mary Quinlivan, of Garruragh, widow of a farmer, age 87 year, died on 26 April 1905; informant son-in-law John Daly, present at death at Tulla (Tulla registration):

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 568771.pdf

James Quinlivan (≈1806 - 1879) and Mary Carroll (≈1818 - 1905) were the parents of at least seven children baptized in Tulla Parish:

.................... 1.? May 1841 through July 1841, missing page of Tulla baptism register.

.................... 1.? Quinlivan children? A first born son named Thomas?

.................... 1.? January 1843 to mid April 1843, missing page of Tulla baptism register.

.................... 1.1 Bridget "Bid" Quinlivan (1845 - prior to 1847), residence not reported, was baptized in October 1845; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Carroll"; sponsor Carroll Daly (Tulla baptism register, 1819-1846).

.................... 1.2 Bridget Quinlivan (1847 - to Queensland - 1922), of Rath, was baptized on 23 August 1847; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Carroll"; sponsor Mary Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

Bridget Quinlivan married Patrick Brennan on 5 May 1874 in Queensland, Australia. Bridget Brennan died in Queenland on 18 January 1822; parents reported as James Quinlivan and Mary Carroll per Australia death index, cert #167).

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/194 ... et-brennan

................................... 1.2.1 James Joseph Brennan (born 1876)
................................... 1.2.2 Anne Maria Brennan (1877)
................................... 1.2.3 Albert Patrick Brennan (1879)
................................... 1.2.4 William Henry Brennan (1881)
................................... 1.2.5 Evelyn Margaret Brennan (1882)
................................... 1.2.6 Herbert Francis Brennan (1884)
................................... 1.2.7 Mabel Beatrice Brennan (1887)


.................... 1.3 Michael Quinlivan (1849 - after 1911), of Garrura, was baptized on 29 August 1849; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Carroll"; sponsor Julia Carrol (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

Michael Quinlivan, farmer, of Garruragh, son of James Quinlivan, married Kate Connellan, of Garruragh, daughter of Michael Connellan, on 4 February 1891 at Tulla chapel; witnesses Daniel Hussey and Ellen Reidy (Tulla civil registration).

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 885142.pdf

................................... 1.3.1 Mary Quinlivan (age 9 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 13; House 18> Mary Quinlivan, of Garruragh, age 39, a nurse, died on 25 April 1931; informant, brother James Quinlivan (Scariff registration).
................................... 1.3.2 James Quinlivan (age 8 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 13; House 18>
................................... 1.3.3 Michael Quinlivan (age 7 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 13; House 18>
................................... 1.3.4 Margaret Quinlivan (age 5 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 13; House 18> Later whereabouts after 1911 are unknown. See Connellan family tree on page 49; died prior to her aunt Annie Reidy in 1936 as not named in will?
................................... 1.3.5 Patrick Quinlivan (age 3 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 13; House 18> Patrick Quinlivan, of Garruragh, age 31 (transcribed as 51, correction submitted), ex civic guard, died on 29 September 1931; informant, brother James Quinlivan (Scariff registration).
................................... 1.3.6 Bridget Quinlivan (age 7 in 1911) <Garruragh, Tulla, x; House 18> Bridget Quinlivan, of Tulla, daughter of Michael Quinlivan (deceased), married John White, a civic guard, of Kilkishen, son of Patrick White (deceased), on 24 November 1930 at Tulla parish church (Scariff registration). Bridget White was named in the will of her aunt, Annie Reidy of Washington DC in 1936.

.................... 1.4 John Quinlivan (1851 - 1886), of Garruragh, was baptized on 12 November 1851; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Carroll"; sponsors John Halvey and Mary Anne Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

John Quinlivan, of Garuragh, bachelor, "age 29", custom's officer, died on 28 July 1886; informant M. Keane, present at death, Tulla (Tulla civil death record, reported as Galway in error).

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 785924.pdf

.................... 1.5 Honora Quinlivan (1853 - after 1911), of Rath, was baptized on 27 October 1853; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Carroll"; sponsor Bridget Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

John Daly, farmer, of Tulla, son of Carol Daly (deceased), married Honoria Quinlivan, teacher, of Garruragh, daughter of James Quinlivan, on 10 February 1880 at Tulla chapel; witnesses Michael Quinlivan and Mary Cleary (Tulla civil registration). Second degree on consanguinity (first cousins).

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 033361.pdf

John Daly and Honor Quinlivan were reported to be the parents of 12 children, eight surviving as of the 1911 census:
................................... 1.5.1 Carroll Daly (1880 - unknown) born on 26 December 1880.
................................... 1.5.2 Mary Daly (1882 - unknown) born on 30 March 1882.
................................... 1.5.3 John Daly (1883 - 1883) born on 27 June 1883.
................................... 1.5.4 Bridget Daly (age 16 in 1901) born on 10 August 1884. <Tulla, Tulla, House 51; House 38>
................................... 1.5.5 John Daly (age 11 in 1901) <Tulla, Tulla, House 51; House 38>
................................... 1.5.6 Nora Daly (age 10 in 1901) <Tulla, Tulla, House 51; x>
................................... 1.5.7 Margaret Daly (age 9 in 1901) <Tulla, Tulla, House 51; x>
................................... 1.5.8 Thomas Daly (age 6 in 1901) <Tulla, Tulla, House 51; x>
................................... 1.5.9 Joseph Daly (age 2 in 1901) <Tulla, Tulla, House 51; House 38>

.................... 1.6 Patrick Quinlivan (1856 - unknown), of Garura, was baptized on 7 February 1856; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Carroll"; sponsors John Daly and Mary McGrath (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

.................... 1.7 James Quinlivan (1862 - unknown), of Garura, was baptized on 28 January 1862; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Carroll"; sponsors Michael and Bridget Hussy (Tulla baptism register, 1862-1881).


2.0 Bridget Quinlivan (≈1804 - 1879)

Bridget Quinlivan, no residence reported, married Carrol Daly, of Rath, on 6 February 1839; witnesses James Daly and Thomas Quinlivan (Tulla marriage register, 1819-1846).

In the 1855 Griffith Valuation, for Garruragh townland, Carrol Daly was sharing Plot 17 and Plot 18 with, "James Quinlivan (Tom)".

Carrol Daly (≈1800 - prior to 1864 ? ) and Bridget Quinlivan (≈1804 - 1879) were the parents of only three boys between 1841 and 1848. A very small family for Ireland, but they married in their late thirties. Carrol Daly likely died prior the 1864 start of Irish civil death records. Bridget Daly, of Tulla, farmer's widow, age 75 years, died on 5 December 1879; informant son John Daly of Tulla.

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 865955.pdf

.................... 2.? May 1841 through July 1841, missing page of Tulla baptism register.

.................... 2.1 John Daly (≈1843 - 1927) was baptized in a period of the early 1840's when Tulla parish has missing baptism records. He was age 56 in 1901, age 66 in 1911, and died in Tulla in 1927 at the age of 83 years old; all fairly consistent with a birth in a period of missing baptism records.

John Daly married his first cousin, Honoria Quinlivan, in 1880. Parents of eight children, family was living in the town of Tulla in the 1901 and 1911 census. See 1.5 above.

.................... 2.? January 1843 to mid April 1843, missing page of Tulla baptism register.

.................... 2.2 James Daly (1846 - unknown), of Tulla, was baptized in February 1846; father Carrol Daly and mother Bid Quinlivan; sponsor John Halvy (Tulla baptism register, 1819-1846).

.................... 2.3 Thomas Daly (1848 - 1910 in Victoria, Australia), of Tulla, was baptized in June 1848; father Carrol Daly and mother "B Quinlivan"; sponsors Anne and Joseph Halvey (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).
Marriages: Daly – Quinlivan – on the 4th inst., at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, by the Rev. Father O’Sullivan, Thomas Joseph Daly, youngest son of the late Mr. Carrol Daly, Tulla, to Honora, fourth daughter of Mr. James Laurence Quinlivan, Gaura, Tulla, County Clare, Ireland.

The Argus (Melbourne), Wed 6 May 1874, per Trove newspaper database
3.0 Mary Quinlivan (≈1808 - 1882)

Mary Quinlivan, no residence reported, married John Boland, of Rath, in February 1839; witnesses Michael Boland and Thomas Quinlivan (Tulla marriage register, 1819-1846).

At 1855 Griffith Valuation, John Boland was leasing Plot 16 in Garruragh townland; house and land; 34 acres; valuation £13. Neighbors with Quinlivans in Plot 15 and Plot 17.

Mary Boland, of Garruragh, a farmer's widow, age 74 years, died on 30 November 1882; informant son Michael Boland of Garruragh (Tulla registration, reported as Galway in error). A John Boland, age 62, died in 1866 in Tulla (registration not yet available on-line).

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 828374.pdf

John Boland (≈1804 - 1866 ? ) and Mary Quinlivan (≈1808 - 1882) were the parents of six children:

.................... 3.1 Michael Boland (≈1841 - prior to 1901)

Michael Boland, of Garurah, farmer, son of John Boland, married Mary Cudmore, daughter of farmer Denis Cudmore, of Knockbrack, on 16 February 1871 at Bodyke Catholic chapel, by the parish priest John Gleeson; witnesses Pat Cudmore and John Daly (Scariff registration).

................................... 3.1.1 John Boland (1872 - unknown), of Garura, was baptized on 17 July 1872; father Michael Boland and mother Mary Cudmore; sponsors Patrick Cudmore and Anne Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1862-1881). <Garruragh, Tulla, House 11; x>
................................... 3.1.2 Anne Boland (1875 - unknown), of Garura, was baptized on 6 February 1875; father Michael Boland and mother Mary Cudmore; sponsors Patrick Quinlivan and Honora Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1862-1881).
................................... 3.1.3 Bridget Boland (1877 - unknown), of Garura, was baptized on 7 February 1877; father Michael Boland and mother Mary Cudmore; sponsors Pat Markham and Johanna Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1862-1881).
................................... 3.1.4 Michael Boland (1879 - unknown), of Garura, was baptized on 26 July 1879; father Michael Boland and mother Mary Cudmore; sponsors Pat Markham and Johanna Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1862-1881). <Garruragh, Tulla, House 11; House 19>
................................... 3.1.5 James Boland (age 20 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 11; House 19>
................................... 3.1.6 Mary Boland (age 15 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 11; x>

.................... 3.2 Bridget Boland (1843 - unknown), no residence reported, was baptized on 14 May 1843; father John Boland and mother Mary Quinlivan; sponsors Michael McInerny and Honor Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1819-1846).

.................... 3.3 Hanna Boland (1846 - unknown), no residence reported, was baptized on 29 November 1846; father John Boland and mother Mary Quinlivan; sponsor Bid McMahon (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

.................... 3.4 John Boland (1848 - unknown), of Rath, was baptized on 28 May 1848; parents reported as "John and Mary Quinlivan", who do not exist as a couple; should be "John Boland" and "Mary Quinlivan"; sponsor Mary Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

.................... 3.5 Margaret Boland (1849 - unknown), of Rath, was baptized on 7 December 1849; father John Boland and mother Mary Quinlivan; sponsor Margaret McNamara (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

.................... 3.6 Mary Boland (1853 - to Victoria - 1888), of Garruragh, was baptized in April 1853; father John Boland and mother Mary Quinlivan; sponsors Carroll Daly and Anne Lillis (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).
The friends of the last Miss MARY BOLAND (formerly of Garruagh, Tulla, Co. Clare, Ireland) are respectfully invited to follow her remains to the place of interment, Coburg Cemetery. The funeral will leave her late residence, O'Hea's road, Coburg, THIS DAY (Wednesday), 8th inst., at 3 o'clcock.
JOHN DALEY, Undertaker, Latrobe and Spring streets, Melbourne.

The Age, Melbourne, Wednesday, 8 February 1888 (per trove newspaper archive)
The Australian Death Index states age as 33 (born about 1855), and parents as John Boland and "Mary Quinnlian" (certificate #1009). Correct parents and a nice headstone (stating birth in Tulla) indicates she likely had family living in Corburg.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/926 ... ary-boland


4.0 John Quinlivan (≈1820 ? - to Victoria - 1882)

John Quinlivan's first born son was named Thomas; the only evidence that he might be the son of Thomas Quinlivan of Garruragh. An Australian death record might provide evidence of his parents.

John Quinlivan, of Ragh, married Mary Boland, of "Lacaru", in February 1841 in Tulla Parish; witnesses Michael Boland of "Lacaru", and a scribbled name from Feakle (Tulla marriage register, 1819-1846).

The location on the 1841 marriage record of "Ragh" might be the same as "Raghill" located in "Rathhill" in Tulla. This was the "abode" and "situation of freehold" of a John Quinlivan in the 1821 Freeholders listing; lease owner left blank; dated 18 January 1813. Is "Rathhill" the same as "Rath", the locality in Garrura?

https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/cocla ... ders_q.htm

John Quinlivan and Mary Boland were the parents of six children between 1843 and 1852. Mary Boland Quinlivan likely died in 1852 or 1853.

John Quinlivan (age 37), an agricultural laborer, and four children, Mary (age 12), Thomas (age 11), Margaret (age 8 ), and Michael (age 6), all born in Clare, arrived in Melbourne, Victoria, on 28 February 1854, on the Blenheim which had departed Plymouth; "gone to brother-in-law" written in the remarks.

"John Quinlan" died 1882 in Prahan, an inner suburb of Melbourne close to St. Kilda, at the reported age of 60, no parents reported on the index (or possibly the original document #6544). On 4 April 1882, "John Quinlivan" was interred at the Catholic section of St. Kilda Cemetery in Compartment B, Grave 389. The same exact grave location as Margaret Quinlivan, whose death certificate (#7334) reported her to be the daughter of John Quinlivan and Mary Boland.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/212 ... -quinlivan

.................... 4.1 Mary Quinlivan (1843 - to Victoria - 1927), no residence reported, was baptized in September 1843; father John Quinlivan and mother Mary Boland; sponsor E McNamara (Tulla baptism register, 1819-1846).

"Bridget Mary" Quinlivan was married in 1878 in Melbourne to Ambrose Bowles (≈1829 - 1889), a widower with many young children. Ambrose was born in Feakle to James Bowles and Mary Ann McMahon; this family was discussed briefly on page 14 of this thread. "Bridget Mary Bowles" died in St. Kilda, Victoria, in 1927, at the reported age of 88, parents reported as John Quinlivan and Mary Boland (cert # 7825). Informant was likely her sister, Margaret Quinlivan.

................................... 4.1.1 Honora Mary Bowles (born 1878)
................................... 4.1.2 John Bowles (1882 - 1882)

.................... 4.2 Thomas Quinlivan (1845 - to Victoria), no residence reported, was baptized on 14 April 1845; father John Quinlivan and mother Mary Boland; sponsors Biddy Quinlivan, Michael (?) (Tulla baptism register, 1819-1846).

.................... 4.3 Margaret Quinlivan (1847 - to Victoria - 1927), of Rath, was baptized on 2 June 1847; father John Quinlivan and mother Mary Boland; sponsor Hanna Hogan (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

Margaret Quinlivan died in Prahan, an inner suburb of Melbourne, in May 1927; parents reported as John Quinlivan and Mary Boland (cert # 7334).

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/212 ... -quinlivan

.................... 4.4 Michael Quinlivan (1849 - to Victoria - 1931), of Rath, was baptized on 5 May 1849; father John Quinlivan and mother Mary Boland; sponsors Ellen Daly, P. Howard (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

"Michael Quinlan" married Oxford born Annie Burdon in 1871 in Victoria (cert # 765).

"Michael Quinlan" died on 26 June 1931 in Brighton, Victoria, at the reported age of 81 years, father reported as "Thomas Quinlan" and mother as Mary Boland (cert #4020). The mistake in his father's name was due, in part, to his two sisters having died in 1927 and thus unable to tell their nephews/nieces their correct grandfather's name. A major roadblock for their descendants.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/215 ... el-quinlan

................................... 4.4.1 Florence Boland Quinlan (born 1872)
................................... 4.4.2 Frederick John Quinlan (1874)
................................... 4.4.3 Annie Elizabeth Quinlan (1877)
................................... 4.4.4 George James Quinlan (1879)
................................... 4.4.5 Albert Edward Quinlan (1881)
................................... 4.4.6 Thomas Henry Quinlan (1883)
................................... 4.4.7 Margaret Eileen Quinlan (1885)


.................... 4.5 Honora Quinlivan (1851 - unknown), of Garrura, was baptized on 4 March 1851; father John Quinlivan and mother Mary Boland; sponsors Batt Buckley and Ellen Daly (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862). Was not with father and four older siblings on passage to Australia.

.................... 4.6 James Quinlivan (1852 - unknown), of Garruragh, was baptized on 31 July 1852; father John Quinlivan and mother Mary Boland; sponsors John McInerhney, Mary McInerhney (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862). Was not with father and four oldest siblings on passage to Australia.


******** Family of Laurence Quinlivan of Garruragh Townland, Tulla **********

A Laurence Quinlivan and Thomas Quinlivan, both of Garrura, were witnesses at the marriage of Bridget Quinlivan of Garrura to Tim Linane of Clouney in March 1822 (Tulla marriage register, 1819-1846).

1825 Freeholders list for Tulla Barony (not on-line; only available at the Local Studies Centre in Ennis, and NLI in Dublin; information below from posting by Paddy Waldron):
Laurence Quinlivan, Abode - Rath, freehold- Rath, Landlord - Mrs. Comyn, Lives on lease - Edmond, John and James Quinlivan.

In the Tithe Applotments, dated 11 February 1827, a James Quinlivan was a tenant, reported the last of Rath tenants, of just 3 acres (3rd quality) with a valuation of only 2 shillings. A Thomas Quinlivan leased a property of 33 acres.
http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarc ... _00622.pdf

By the 1829 Freeholders Listing, available on-line at the Clare Library, Thomas Quinlivan and James Quinlivan, both with house and lands at Rath, Tulla Barony, sessions held on 13 June 1829, both freehold worth of £10.

https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/cocla ... urname.htm

In the 1827 Tithe Applotments, the land holding of Laurence Quinlivan was identical in size, quality of acres, and value, to the holding of John Hogan — who does not appear on the 1829 Freeholder listing (or the Tulla baptism records as a father). Had James Quinlivan, son of Laurence Quinlivan, taken over the lease for these lands?

At 1855 Griffith Valuation for Garruragh townland, Plot 15 was held by "James Quinlivan (Larry)"; this James appears to be the son of Laurence Quinlivan and the extra detail reported to distinguish him from "James Quinlivan (Tom)".

1.0 Edmond Quinlivan

An Edmond was reported as "Lives on Lease" for the Rath freehold of Laurence Quinlivan in an 1825 Freeholders List. I do not know whether or not this is evidence that Edmond was a son of Laurence Quinlivan.


2.0 John Quinlivan

A John was reported as "Lives on Lease" for the Rath freehold of Laurence Quinlivan in an 1825 Freeholders List. I do not know whether or not this is evidence that John was a son of Laurence Quinlivan.


3.0 James Laurence Quinlivan (≈1806 - 1879)

A James was reported as "Lives on Lease" for the Rath freehold of Laurence Quinlivan in an 1825 Freeholders List. I do not know if this is solid evidence that James was a son of Laurence Quinlivan. However, the 1855 Griffith Valuation report of a "Jas Quinlivan (Larry)" for Garruragh townland indicates that this would be the case.

James Quinlivan of Rath was married twice, first to Mary Canny and then to Mary McNamara. This is known as when the second born daughter of James Quinlivan and Mary McNamara, Honoria, born in 1845, was married in Australia in 1874, the marriage announcement reported her as the fourth born daughter of James Quinlivan; James having had three daughters previously with Mary Canny. Presumably, one of the three daughters died young making Honoria married in 1874 the fourth born daughter. Her Australia death record also confirms that she is the daughter of James McNamara and Mary McNamara.

There are two death records for a James Quinlivan of Garruragh who died in 1879 and another in 1883, Matthew Keane of Tulla is the informant for both. When Honor Quinlivan, the daughter of James McNamara and Mary Carroll, married in 1880, the father of the groom (Carol Daly) was reported as "deceased", but not the father of the bride, James McNamara (married to Mary Carroll, and also uncle of the groom). Therefore, the James Laurence Quinlivan, married to Mary Carroll, must have died in 1883, and the James Quinlivan, married to Mary McNamara, must have did in 1879

James Quinlivan, of Garuragh, married, age 73 years, farmer, died on 25 September 1879; informant Matthew Keane of Tulla (not reported, but his son-in-law and an ex-Coercion Suspect). Tulla registration, reported as Galway in error:

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 869685.pdf

The marriage of James Quinlivan and Mary Canny is unknown. They were the parents of three daughters baptized in the Tulla baptism register between 1833 and 1838. Mary Canny Quinlivan died sometime between 1838 and about 1842.

.................... 3.1 Margaret Quinlivan (1833 - unknown), of Garura, was baptized on 19 April 1833; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Canny"; sponsors Pat Canny and Margaret Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1819-1846).

Possibly, the Margaret Quinlivan, of Tulla, who married John Doogan, of Clooney, on 26 February 1848; witnesses Tom Doogan and James Quinlivan (Tulla marriage register, 1846-1861). Later whereabouts unknown.

.................... 3.2 Mary Quinlivan (1835 - unknown), of Rath, was baptized on 1 July 1835; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Canny"; sponsors Edmond McNamara and Bridget Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1819-1846).

.................... 3.3 Bridget "Bid" Quinlivan (1838 - unknown), of Rath, was baptized on 14 April 1838; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Couny (?)"; sponsors Mr(?). Butler and Laurence Butler (Tulla baptism register, 1819-1846).

James McNamara (≈1806 - 1879) and Mary McNamara (≈1820 - 1884) of Rath, Garrura, were the parents of nine children: eight reported in the Tulla baptism registers between 1845 and 1862, and one daughter (Helen) born about 1843, a period of missing baptism pages. Their marriage, anytime between 1838 and prior to the birth of Helen in 1843, is unknown.

Mary Quinlivan, of Garuragh, farmer's widow, died on 3 May 1884 at the reported ago 64; informant Matt Keane of Tulla (Tulla registration, reported as Galway in error). Not reported, but Matthew Keane of Tulla was her son-in-law.

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 812920.pdf

.................... 3.? May 1841 through July 1841, missing page of Tulla baptism register.

.................... 3.4 Helen Quinlivan (≈1843 - to Victoria - 1926) was baptized in a period of the early 1840's when Tulla parish has missing baptism pages. According to the Australia Death Index, when she died in 1926, her age of 77 years reflected a birth year of 1849. Her age was likely fibbed by about five years to make her younger than her husband, born in 1848. Her parents were reported as James Quinlivan and Mary McNamara on the 1926 death certificate (#7112).

Per the Australia Marriage Index, Helen Quinlivan married James Quinlivan in Victoria in 1879. When James Quinlivan died in Port Melbourne in 1942, at the age of 92 , his parents were reported as "Thomas Quinlivan" and "Catherine McInerney" (cert #943). James Quinlivan was baptized on 7 March 1848; father was Thomas Quinlivan; and mother was scribbled "McInerney" (transcribed as "M. Meany"), a consistent scribble as the sponsor Edmond McInerney. Thomas Quinlivan and Catherine McInerney were the parents of at least eight children in Liscullane, Tulla parish. Helen Quinlivan and James Quinlivan would have known each other since childhood.

https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls ... 7/mode/1up

................................... 3.4.1 Patrick Quinlivan (1880, born in Victoria)
................................... 3.4.2 James Thomas Quinlivan (1881)
................................... 3.4.3 John Patrick Quinlivan (1882)
................................... 3.4.4 Mary Catherine Quinlivan (1884)
................................... 3.4.5 Edward Lawrence Quinlivan (1886)

.................... 3.? January 1843 to mid April 1843, missing page of Tulla baptism register.

.................... 3.5 Honor Quinlivan (1845 - to Victoria - 1933), of Garura, was baptized in March 1845; father James Quinlivan and mother "Mary Mack"; sponsor Elle Mack (Tulla baptism register, 1819-1846).
Marriages: Daly – Quinlivan – on the 4th inst., at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, by the Rev. Father O’Sullivan, Thomas Joseph Daly, youngest son of the late Mr. Carrol Daly, Tulla, to Honora, fourth daughter of Mr. James Laurence Quinlivan, Gaura, Tulla, County Clare, Ireland

The Argus (Melbourne), Wed 6 May 1874, per Trove newspaper database
Per Australia death index, Norah Daley died in Victoria in 1933; parents reported as "James Quinlivan" and "McNamara" (cert. # 595).

.................... 3.6 Laurence Quinlivan (1847 - to Victoria - 1884), no residence reported, was baptized on 31 January 1847; father James Quinlivan and mother Mary McNamara; sponsors Tim Connell and Margaret Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).
At Ballyroghan, in this County, Mrs. James Quinlivan, of a son.

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Monday, 18 January 1847
A confusing newspaper article. The Quinlivans of Ballyroughan had no children born in January 1847; I also reviewed Quin parish records by date with no luck. The Clare Journal must be referring to the Laurence Quinlivan who will later be baptized in Tulla on the 31st of January. But they lived in Garruragh in Tulla parish. Was reporting "Ballyroghan" a simple mistake by the newspaper?

Laurence Quinlivan emigrated to Victoria. He married Margaret Ellen McInerney in Ballarat in 1878. Per the Australia Death Index, Lawrence Quinlivan, age 39, died in Melbourne in 1884; parents reported as James Quinlivan and Mary McNamara (cert # 5233).

................................... 3.6.1 James Lawrence Quinlivan (born 1881)

.................... 3.7 Patrick Quinlivan (1849 - unknown), no residence reported, was baptized on 29 March 1849; father James Quinlivan and mother Mary McNamara; sponsor Nory Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

.................... 3.8 Anne Quinlivan (1852 - 1900 in Brooklyn), of "Ragh", was baptized on 18 January 1852; father James Quinlivan and mother Mary McNamara; sponsors Stephen McDonough and Maryanne McDonough (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

Anne Quinlivan married Matthew Keane on 17 February 1874 (see Sheila's prior posting)
THE WEEK'S ARRESTS
On Thursday week three more arrests were made in Tulla under the Coercion Act. The suspects, who are all respectable inhabitants of the town, are —Richard Colbourne, hotel keeper; Matthew Keane, grocer; and Patrick Markham, hardware merchant.

Dublin Weekly Nation, Saturday, 19 November 1881
Matthew Kean was unconditionally released from Naas Jail on 2 May 1882 (The Irishman, Saturday, 6 May 1882).

Matthew Keane, of Tulla, contributed 10 shillings in 1882 to the fund to benefit the sisters of the executed Francis Hynes (Clare Freeman, and Ennis Gazette, 14 Oct. 1882).

In the Tulla dog register, Matt Keane, of Tulla, purchased a license (#191), on 28 March 1893, for a female black terrier. This is the last dog license Matthew Keane would ever purchase in Ireland.

Matt Keane (age 50) and his wife Anne Keane (age 40) and children: Kate (age 15, 1 month), John James (age 10, 6 months), Pat Jos (age 8, 6 months), and Matthew (age 6, 6 months), arrived in New York on the SS Lucania on 28 April 1894; their destination was New Jersey.

Annie Keane, married, born Ireland, age 45, of 32 "Willace Place", Brooklyn, died on 11 April 1900, burial at Holy Cross; father, "James Quinlan"; mother, "Mary Quinlan". Certificate #7243 (per NY Index to death certificates). Having obtained the certificate number, the actual death record is now available on-line at NYC department of records:

https://a860-historicalvitalrecords.nyc ... ew/3862609

Matthew Keane (≈1845 - 1933) and Anne Quinlivan (1852 - 1900) were the parents of six children, all of whom will move to New York:

................................... 3.8.1 Margaret Keane (1875 - to New York), of town of Tulla, was baptized on 4 January 1875; father Matthew Keane and mother Anne Quinlivan; sponsors James Quinlivan and Catherine Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1862-1881).

................................... 3.8.2 Mary Anne Keane (1876 - to New York), of town of Tulla, was baptized on 6 March 1876; father Matthew Keane and mother Anne Quinlivan; sponsors Michael Quinlivan and Mary Anne Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1862-1881).

................................... 3.8.3 Catherine Keane (1878 - to New York), of town of Tulla, was baptized on 22 March 1878; father "Matthew Kane" and mother Anne Quinlivan; sponsors John Kennedy and Mary Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1862-1881).

................................... 3.8.4 John Keane (1882 - to New York), was born on 2 February 1882 in the town of Tulla, father's occupation was shopkeeper (Tulla registration).

................................... 3.8.5 Patrick Joseph Keane (1883 - to New York), was born on 16 April 1883 in the town of Tulla, father's occupation was shopkeeper (Tulla registration).

................................... 3.8.6 Matthew Keane (1884 - to New York), was born on 22 December 1884 in the town of Tulla, father's occupation was shopkeeper (Tulla registration).
MATTHEW KEANE died yesterday in his home, 121 Bergen St. He was born in Tulla, County Clare, Ireland, and had been a resident of Brooklyn for many years. He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. James J. Connolly, Mrs. Mollie Crowley, and Mrs. Frank Quilty; three sons, John J. Patrick J., and Matthew S., and several grandchildren. The funeral will be held at 9:30 A.M. Monday from the residence, thence to the R.C. Church of St. Paul, where a requiem mass will be offered. Burial will be in Holy Cross Cemetery.
Times Union, Brooklyn, 2 December 1933
https://a860-historicalvitalrecords.nyc ... ew/6230922

.................... 3.9 James Quinlivan (1854 - to Victoria - 1879), of "Raah", was baptized on 31 March 1854; father James Quinlivan and mother Mary McNamara; sponsors Stephen McDonogh and Jane Nixon (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

Per the Australia Death Index, James Quinlivan died in 1879 at the age 24; parents reported as James Quinlivan and Mary McNamara (cert # 2239).
Funeral Notices.
The friends of the late Mr. JAMES QUINLIVAN are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, Boroondara Cemetery, Kew. The funeral will move from his brother's residence, Forester's Arms Hotel, Simpson's road, North Richmond, on SUNDAY, 9th inst., at three o'clock.
JOHN DALEY, Undertaker, Latrobe and Spring streets, Melbourne.

The Herald,
Melbourne, 8 March 1879
.................... 3.10 John Quinlivan (1856 - unknown), of Garrura, was baptized on 14 September 1856; father James Quinlivan and mother Mary McNamara; sponsors Carroll Daly and Mary Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

.................... 3.11 Michael Quinlivan (1858 - after 1911), of Garura, was baptized on 23 October 1858; father James Quinlivan and mother Mary McNamara; sponsors Stephen McDonogh and Margaret Quinlivan (Tulla baptism register, 1846-1862).

Michael Quinlivan, of Garrura, farmer, son of James Quinlivan, married Mary Shalloo, of Knockattoo, daughter of Michael Shalloo, on 29 April 1890 at the chapel at O'Callaghan Mills by the parish priest Denis Cleary; witnesses Michael Quinlivan (son of the other James) and Nora Hogan (Tulla registration).

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/ ... 904690.pdf

Michael Quinlivan (1858 - after 1911) and Mary Shalloo were the parents of nine children, eight surviving as per the 1911 census:

................................... 3.11.1 James Quinlivan (age 10 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 12; House 17>
................................... 3.11.2 Michael Quinlivan (age 9 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 12; House 17>
................................... 3.11.3 Mary Quinlivan (age 7 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 12; x>
................................... 3.11.4 Norah Quinlivan (age 6 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 12; House 17>
................................... 3.11.5 Margaret Quinlivan (age 4 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 12; House 17>
................................... 3.11.6 John Quinlivan (1896 - 1896)
................................... 3.11.7 Catherine Quinlivan (age 2 in 1901) <Garruragh, Tulla, House 12; House 17>
................................... 3.11.8 Patrick Quinlivan (age 9 in 1911) <Garruragh, Tulla, x; House 17>
................................... 3.11.9 John Quinlivan (age 7 in 1911) <Garruragh, Tulla, x; House 17>

.................... 3.12 Catherine Quinlivan (1862 - unknown), of Garrura, was baptized on 27 August 1862; father James Quinlivan and mother Mary McNamara; sponsors Michael Quinlivan and Mary Reidy (Tulla baptism register, 1862-1881).


Edit 1 on 9 Dec. 2023: Switched 1879 and 1883 death records between two James Quinlivans; traced several Quinlivans to Australia.
Last edited by Jimbo on Sat Dec 09, 2023 11:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

Sduddy
Posts: 1834
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:07 am

Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Sduddy » Fri Dec 08, 2023 9:39 am

Hi Jimbo

Sorry, I confused the post of Master of the Workhouse with School Master.

Yes, I did use the link you provided for the topic “Quinlivan of Ballyroughan” and I read it all, but did not think there was any contradiction between the Ballyroughan Quinlivans having a priest (or two) and the Garruragh Quinlivans having their own priest. But you have convinced me that Rev. Mr. Quinlivan is most likely Rev. Michael Quinlivan of Ballyroughan. I admit I was taking the word “nephews” too literally.

As you say, Jimbo, it was a challenge, but you have done a great job setting out the family trees of the Garruragh Quinlivans. If I was at it for a hundred years, I couldn’t do it! Good work finding Tim Linane and Bridget Quinlivan in Maghera, Clooney, and their son, Patrick. Good work realizing that James Quinlivan who married Mary Canny was the same James who married Mary McNamara. And good work figuring that Matthew Keane was the son-in-law of that James, and not the James who married Mary Carroll. So it is clear that Mary Quinlivan aged 85 in 1901 is Mary Carroll. Good work finding the emigration record for John Quinlivan and Mary Boland. Also finding the story of Matthew Keane and his emigration along with his family. There are several other “good works”.

A note on Rath/Ragh/Raah: Rath is one of the Irish words for “Fort”. The letter ‘h’ in “Rath” is just a symbol denoting the softening or silencing of the preceding consonant ‘t’, so Rath is often pronounced “Raa”. The parish of Rath, for instance, is pronounced “Raa”. I should add that Rath is also often pronounced “Wrath” - the people living in Rathgar in Dublin would never say they lived in Raagar.

Sheila

Edited to fix typo: "Digaden" amended to "Carroll"
Last edited by Sduddy on Mon Dec 11, 2023 12:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

smcarberry
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Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by smcarberry » Fri Dec 08, 2023 3:59 pm

Sorry that I could not be of more help at this stage of the Garruragh discussion, but I was off around the country to enjoy the last of the good weather, with only 2 days back at home between my jaunts. Now back longterm with my efiles, I see I have some Quinlivan obituaries for the U.S., if anyone needs that. However, what I can do now is definitively establish that in Co. Clare of 1851, the only Rev. Quinlivan of record was Michael whose obituary I posted so long ago separately. Battersby's Catholic Registry of 1851 at p. 367 provides every parish priest and curate in the Diocese of Killaloe, with only Michael Quinlivan listed, as a curate in Ennis. Here's the link:
https://www.google.com/books/edition/Ba ... frontcover

Slater's Commercial Directory for 1846 likewise shows that Michael Quinlivan was a curate in Ennis, residing at New Hall. Since the entire directory is not online (there's a paywall to get it all) the relevant listings appear in snippet views at pages 234 and 236:
https://books.google.com/books?id=2TZPA ... an&f=false

Jimbo
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Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Jimbo » Sat Dec 09, 2023 10:35 am

Hi Sharon,

Thank you for providing the 1851 Catholic priest registry and 1846 Slater's directory. Here are a few more clippings of Rev. Michael Quinlivan's various exploits and promotions through the 1850's.
At the Petty Sessions of Ennis, the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan, RCC, and two others, appeared to answer the charge of having broken into the house of Thady James, in that town, and assaulted the inmates. Mr. Hynes, as solicitor for the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan, did not deny the charge, but urged in extenuation that the prosecutor kept a house of ill-fame. The magistrates granted informations against all parties, also against James for keeping an improper house. (Kings County Chronicle, 13 April 1853).
THE REV. MR. QUINLIVAN, C.C.
A very respectable meeting of the Roman Catholics of this town [Ennis], was held . . . [with resolutions adopted] . . . expressive of the regret at the removal of Rev. Mr. Quinlivan, R.C.C., from among them . . . The Rev. Mr. Quinlivan is appointed Administrator of Newmarket-on-Fergus, vice the Rev. Mr. Furnice, who succeeds the late Rev. Mr. Walsh, as Parish Priest of Killinea, adjoining Kilrush (Clare Journal, 24 April 1854).
The Rev. M. Quinlivan, who has been promoted to the parish of Kilmackduan, took his leave to-day of his late parishioners in Newmarket, the Wells, Carragoran. Nothing could exceed the feelings of heart-felt grief . . . (Clare Journal, 13 Sept. 1858).
We are glad to announce that Mr. Laurence Quinlivan, son of Mr. Michael Quinlivan, of Ballyvaughan, and brother to the Rev. Michael Quinlivan, who left this county and emigrated to America about nine years ago, has returned a few days ago in good health and succeeded in realising and bringing home a considerable sum of money. (Clare Journal, 14 February 1859).
Hi Sheila, thank you for your kind comments. But taking a fresh look at my Quinlivan research this morning, I made a big mistake on the death records for the two James Quinlivan's. I had it my head that it was the Australian marriage record of Honoria Quinlivan that proved both (1) the James who was first married to Mary Canny and (2) who died in 1879 versus 1883. But I had the dates of the marriages incorrect in my head, not the family tree. In fact, Honor Quinlivan married Thomas Daly in 1874, so her marriage had no bearing on who died in 1879 versus 1883. The fact that she was the fourth daughter of James Quinlivan, meant that she was the daughter of James Quinlivan and Mary McNamara (now confirmed with her Australian death record).

It was the 1880 marriage of Honor Quinlivan to John Daly, where the father of the groom, Carol Daly was reported as "deceased", but not the father of the bride. This Honor was the daughter of James Quinlivan and Mary Carroll, and thus this James died in 1883. Easy to confuse when there are two James Quinlivans, who both have a daughter named Honor, who both marry a Mr. Daly.

Have now updated family trees of prior posting. This correction did not change much (who married who, their children), but does make more sense:
1) The elder James Quinlivan, born about 1806, is now the one to have been married to Mary Canny, and had a child in 1833. The other James Quinlivan, born about 1812, had a daughter with Mary Carroll in 1845.
2) Previously, the James Quinlivan, son of Laurence Quinlivan, if born in 1812 would have been too young to be the James Quinlivan of the Tithe Applotments, dated 11 February 1827. But now, since born in 1806, it would be possible (although my grandfather theory is another possibility).

The James Quinlivan of Plot 15 strongly identified with being the son of Laurence Quinlivan. As he was reported on Griffith Valuation as "Jas Quinlivan (Larry)". His first born son was Laurence in 1847. But also in the Tulla dog register of 1867, where James Quinlivan gave his residence as "Larry Garruragh":

Tulla Log License Register of 1867, James Quinlivan of Larry Garruragh.jpg
Tulla Log License Register of 1867, James Quinlivan of Larry Garruragh.jpg (77.39 KiB) Viewed 259801 times

Was curious that James Laurence Quinlivan (≈1806 -1879) of Garruragh (Plot 17) went to Tulla to get his dog license with a Thomas Quinlivan of Liscullane. Could they be cousins? In looking at the Tulla baptism registers, there are many many Quinlivans in Liscullane and decided it best not ask any further questions about possible relations. However, not 20 minutes later, in researching the children of James Laurence Quinlivan (≈1806-1879), who does a daughter of James marry in Australia? The son of Thomas Quinlivan of Liscullane, a young man named James Quinlivan! 12 years after the two Quinlivans went to Tulla together to get dog licenses, their children obtained a marriage license in Victoria. In the past, I would have then concluded that James Laurence Quinlivan of Garruragh could not be related to Thomas Quinlivan of Licullane, since their children married. But, conversely, perhaps the marriage of their children actually is evidence that the Garruragh and Liscullane Quinlivans were related?

John Quinlivan and four of his children emigrated to Victoria in 1854. Through Australian death records I was able to track down the death of a "John Quinlan" and based upon the burial plot prove that he was the father of Margaret Quinlivan and other children. Unfortunately on the index, his parents were not reported. Incredibly, his daughter Mary Quinlivan ended up marrying the widower Ambrose Bowles, born in Feakle, whose Bowles family we briefly discussed on page 14 of this thread back in 2018. Australian marriage and death records, at least those in Victoria, don't report birthplace. The family trees on ancestry have Mary Quinlivan's death record, and thus parents, but assume she was born in Australia. Another son, Michael Quinlivan, had "Thomas" as his father on his death record. It was much easier tracing this Quinlivan family forward.

In 1869, there were several donation drives for the Fenian prisoners in Australia, some of whom were soon to be released :
GOD BLESS THE PEOPLE.
At the request of numerous workers for the movement we shall keep open the list until further notice. It has, also, been pointed out to use that upon return home of our countrymen who are to be released in Australia, that the funds will require to be augmented to provide their pressing wants. Therefore, we trust, the good Irishmen who have laboured so long and so successfully in furtherance of this good cause will not cease their exertions, so that when our heroes come home to us we shall show that we are not unmindful of their sacrifices for us. Cards and lists for collecting can be had from the offices of the IRISHMAN and FLAG, and also from the agents for those journals throughout the country. [in Table format £, shilling, pence]
Per F P Hughes, 27 Great Brunswick-street [£0 2 6]
The Jarrow Concert Commitee, per M. Mulhatten [23 0 0]
Per Miss Bridget Quinlivan, Garuragh, Tulla, Co. Clare [6 4 6]
Per Mrs. Griffin, the American Bearded Lady now being exhibited at No. 158 Capel-street [3 0 0]
Per Patrick Murray, Lurgan [0 2 0]

Flag of Ireland, Dublin, 5 June 1869
What an illustrious listing! And why was Bridget Quinlivan of Garruragh on it? £6 in 1869 was a substantial amount of money. Had she collected it from others or was it her own donation? I am fairly certain that Miss Bridget Quinlivan was the daughter of James Quinlivan and Mary Carroll born in 1847, and not the daughter of James Quinlivan and Mary Canny born in 1838. Upon further research, Bridget Quinlivan, born in 1847 emigrated to Queensland where she married in 1874. Have updated the Quinlivan family trees with about five or six other Quinlivans who emigrated to Australia, mostly to Victoria. Surprisingly, except for the family of ex-Coercion Suspect, Matthew Keane, none have gone to America.

Sduddy
Posts: 1834
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Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Sduddy » Sat Dec 09, 2023 11:31 am

Hi Sharon and Jimbo

This thread is flying on so quickly! I wanted to reply to Sharon, but, by the time I'd composed my reply, there was more from you, Jimbo. I wanted to read your latest more carefully, and reply tomorrow, but I know that the question re the identity of Rev. Mr. Quinlivan will be "history" by then.

Sharon, I'm glad to hear you enjoyed some good weather. We are getting plenty of wind and rain.
Thank you very much for that link to Battersby’s Catholic Registry of 1851. It is a really valuable source of information on the priests who were practising at that time.
I agree that Rev Michael Quinlivan was the only Rev. Quinlivan practising in 1851 and I agree that he is most likely the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan who was brought to a meeting of the Tulla Board of Guardians that year. But there is some evidence that there was another Rev. Quinlivan alive at the time. Here are a couple of allusions to an elderly priest, Rev. Patrick Quinlivan. He is not the young Patrick who was from Ballyroughan and who drowned in 1869, aged 40:

(1) Right Rev Pat Quinlivan is mentioned as executor of the will of Thomas Kenny PP of Nenagh, dated 17 May 1850, in the Kenny Farmily of Treanmanagh history donated by Margaret Gallery: https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/cocla ... 0_1800.htm:
Will of Thomas Kenny PP of Nenagh dated 17th May 1850
Thomas Kenny PP of Nenagh leaves £285 to his father and sister and also the proceeds of his household effects which he directs to be sold. His house and premises at Summerhill, Nenagh he leaves in trust to the Rev D Kennedy RCB as a convent for the Sisters of Mercy. He leaves his watch and chain, outside car and harness to the Rev K O’Leary carriage and harness to the Right Rev. D Kennedy. Three policies for insurance on his life 500, 200, 300 he leaves to his father and sister.
Execs very Rev John Kenny right Rev Pat Quinlivan
Administration with will annexed granted to Matthew Kenny Esq of Ennis his father and sole next of kin.
(2) The death of a Rev Patrick Quinlivan, formerly P.P., of Inagh, was reported in the Clare Journal of Mon 27 Feb 1860 (Paddy Waldron alludes to this) : At Lahinch, on Wednesday, after a short illness, at an advanced age, the Rev. Patrick Quinlivan, formerly P.P., of Inagh. From the beginning of his sickness, which he dreaded would prove fatal, He was constantly attended by one of the Ennistymon Curates. Though comparatively a stranger, and apparently friendless – he experienced much kindness and attention from both the parochial clergy, and the people.

(3) A note made by Rev. Patrick Quinlivan, P.P. in 1852, entered in the Doonass and Truagh parish marrage register in 1852, was transcribed by cityfitz (Jeff)- see topic “Doonass and Truagh Baptisms and Marriages”: http://www.ourlibrary.ca/phpbb2/viewtop ... van#p13507:
I Reverend Patrick Quinlivan formerly Parish Priest of the Parish of Kiltannonlea of Doonass in the County of Clare, but now of the laity of Limerick, do hereby certify that on the Twenty-sixth day of November one thousand eight hundred and twenty-two The Honorable Thomas Browne, son of the late Earl of Kenmare was duly and Canonically married to Miss Catherine O’Callaghan, daughter of Edmond O'Callaghan Esquire, then deceased of Mount Catherine in the Parish of Kiltanonlea or Doonass in the County of Clare, of which I was then the Parish Priest and that said marriage ceremony was performed by the Right Reverend Dr O'Saughnessy, Roman Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of Killaloe for me and in my presence according to the Rites of the Roman Catholic Church to which they belonged which Ceremony was witnessed by Mrs Ellen Baggot, Robert Braxton and Mary Braxton his wife and others. Which I certify this 20th day of May 1952, Patrick Quinlivan, p.p. The above is the substance of the entry in the Register of the parish of Kiltanmonlea of Doonass made by me on the 26th day of November 1822 - which I certify this 20th day of May 1852, Patrick Quinlivan, p.p.
Jimbo, thank you for the extra work you have done on the Garruragh Quinlivans. I thought I had an eagle eye, but I'm afraid I would never have spotted the mistake you have now corrected. Previously you had mentioned that the Garruraghians had emigrated to Australia "en masse", and I thought that was too general a comment, but you have provided plenty of evidence for it. I will re-read your post now.

Sheila

Jimbo
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Re: Information is wanted of Thomas McNamara, of Glandree,

Post by Jimbo » Sun Dec 10, 2023 8:45 am

Yes, I did use the link you provided for the topic “Quinlivan of Ballyroughan” and I read it all, but did not think there was any contradiction between the Ballyroughan Quinlivans having a priest (or two) and the Garruragh Quinlivans having their own priest. But you have convinced me that Rev. Mr. Quinlivan is most likely Rev. Michael Quinlivan of Ballyroughan. I admit I was taking the word “nephews” too literally.
Hi Sheila,

Several days ago now you expressed your initial concern, and your latest posting stating the Rev. Michael Quinlivan "is most likely the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan" continues to express some doubt. Was it truly the Rev. Michael Quinlivan who attended the 1851 meeting at the Tulla Board of Gaurdians with his so called "two nephews"? Since you appear to think we might be going a bit too fast in arriving at our conclusion, and in an effort to put your mind at rest, I did a more thorough search of the British newspaper archives. You will be pleased with the results.
COUNTY OF CLARE.
COUNTY OF CLARE, DIVISION OF TULLA.

LIST of Applications to Register Freeholds at Killaloe Sessions, Tuesday, October 12, 1847.

[an alphabetical listing, only by first letter of surname]. . .
1—Patrick Burke, farmer, Aughboy, house and land at Aughboy, Tulla Barony, freehold, £10
2—James Browne, same, Coolastike, same at Coolastike, same, same, £10 Re-registry.

77—Rev. Patrick Quinlivan, R.C. Priest, Silvermines, County Tipperary, same [house and land] at Garruragh, same [Tulla Barony], same [freeholder], £20.
78—James Quinlivan, sen., farmer, Garruragh, same at same, same, same, £10.
79—James Quinlivan, jun., same, same, same at same, same, same, £10.
80—Thomas Quinlivan, same, same, same at same, same, same, £10.
81—John Quinlivan, sen., same, same, same at same, same, same, £10.
82—John Quinlivan, jun. same, same, same at same, same, same, £10.
83—James Quigly, same, Affogh, same at Affogh, same, same, £10.

. . .
102—John Williams, shoemaker, Scariff, same at Scariff, same, same, £10.

WILLIAM KEANE, Clerk of the Peace
Clerk Peace's Office
Sept 22nd, 1847

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser, Monday, 27 September 1847
Sheila, based upon the above evidence, you were absolutely correct to be doubtful. It was the Rev. Patrick Quinlivan who attended the meeting and he would have attended with his two nephews (with no quotation marks).

Note the above article was searched using the term "Quinlivan". My prior searches using "Garruragh" were unsuccessful in finding this article due its transcription completely passing over the word "Garruragh" which followed the entry for #78 James Quinlivan.

Sheila, I would appreciate your opinion as far as who is who on the 1847 freeholder applicant listing.

My own theory, which I could easily be wrong, is based upon the assumption that on the Freeholder listing, the terms "sen" and "jun" do not mean "father and son", but "older and younger". The below is the third iteration of my theory; all three were quite different:

#80 Thomas Quinlivan in 1847, is consistent with the Griffith Valuation, Plot 17 "James Quinlivan (Tom)", so #80 Thomas had died prior to Griffith Valuation, and prior to the 1851 meeting which his two sons would attend with their uncle:

1) His son, James Quinlivan (≈1812 - 1883) of Plot 17, who by 1847 was married with one child, would be #79 "James Quinlivan, jun." Born in 1812, he was the younger of the two James McNamara's of Garruragh.

2) #82 "John Quinlivan, jun", would be the John Quinlivan (≈1820? - to Victoria - 1882) who went to Victoria, Australia in February 1854. In 1847, this John Quinlivan was married with three children. He named his first born son, Thomas. This John Quinlivan's emigration to Australia may have been due in part to the Quinlivans' loss of their lands at Garruragh to build the Tulla Workhouse.

#79 James and #82 John, both sons of #80 Thomas, were the two nephews of #77, the Rev. Patrick Quinlivan, the three attended the 1851 meeting together. It is critical to remember that the Tulla Workhouse (Plot 14) was, in viewing the map that accompanies Griffith Valuation, taken from the lands of Plot 17, leased by "James Quinlivan (Tom)".

Separately, . . .

From the 1825 Freeholders list for Tulla Barony, quoted previously:
Laurence Quinlivan, Abode - Rath, freehold- Rath, Landlord - Mrs. Comyn, Lives on lease - Edmond, John and James Quinlivan.

Laurence Quinlivan was possibly a brother of the Rev. Patrick Quinlivan, I'm not sure. Clearly a relative which would explain why they all applied to register their freeholds at Killaloe on 12 October 1847.

This Laurence Quinlivan had died prior to 1847, but two of his sons (John and James) were still living in 1847 and were £10 freeholders.

1) The Griffith Valuation, Plot 15, "James Quinlivan (Larry)", who by 1847 was the father of five or six children, would be #78 "James Quinlivan, sen". Born in 1806, this James Quinlivan (≈1806 - 1879) would be the "senior" of the two James McNamara's of Garruragh.

2) #81 "John Quinlivan, sen.", the son of Laurence Quinlivan, and older than the other John Quinlivan, #82, son of Thomas Quinlivan, who went to Australia in 1854.

If my above theory is correct, I would only need to add a comment about #81 "John Quinlivan, Sen" in the Laurence Quinlivan family tree, under "2.0 John Quinlivan". He appears to have had no descendants.

Note for the above theory that it was absolutely critical to learn which of the two James Quinlivans had died in 1879 versus 1883, and thus based upon their ages at death, who was "senior" versus "junior".

Sheila, it appears that your initial theory was correct all along:
I think that Laurence, Thomas and the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan belonged to one generation, and that the two Jameses listed in Griffiths are the next generation. Just speculation, of course.
The Rev. Patrick Quilivan appears to have been a wealthy man. Obtaining his Will would hopefully prove who his descendants were. Sheila, I have some doubt that the Rev. Patrick Quinlivan who died in 1860 in Lahinch had truly been the parish priest of "Inagh". I reckon he had been the parish priest of "Nenagh" in County Tipperary? A simple typo by the Clare Journal on his origins? The newspaper comment that Father Quinlivan was "apparently friendless" was sad. He certainly would have had many relatives in Garruragh and Victoria upon his death in 1860.

For a former parish priest, it is surprising that I could find no other articles about his death in the Irish press.

And, unfortunately, I could not find Patrick Quinlivan on the Calendars of Wills and Administrations, 1858-1922, at the Irish National Archives:

http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchiv ... /index.jsp

Typically, when there is one Catholic priest in the family, the next generation also has a Catholic priest. I wonder if this is the case for the relatives of the Rev. Patrick Quinlivan.

Sheila, thank you for casting doubt on the identity of the Rev. Mr. Quinlivan. A job well done! Please take your time in considering this new and exciting evidence regarding the Rev. Patrick Quinlivan. There is no rush for you to respond "I told you so".

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